Activities For Austrian Pinschers

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Introduction

Austrian Pinschers have a lot in common with their German Pinscher cousins - both breeds are medium sized and have sporty, athletic physiques, both dogs were originally bred to operate as work animals rather than show dogs, and both Austrian Pinschers and German Pinschers have been around for more than 50 years. Austrian Pinschers also have a slew of features that set them apart from German Pinschers though - Austrian Pinschers tend to be heavier than German Pinschers and they were specifically bred to work on farmlands, just to name a few of their key features. Austrian Pinschers can make great pets for just about anyone as long as they are willing to put in the work and effort to properly raise one of these dogs.

Guard Dog Training

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Any Day
Expensive
Hard
1 hr
Items needed
Leash
Guard Dog Training Gear
Activity description
Just because German Pinschers are renowned guard dogs doesn't mean Austrian Pinschers can't learn to fill that role as well; Austrian Pinschers are just as attentive, assertive, and protective as German Pinschers - in other words, both breeds of dog won't hesitate to act if they sense that their families are in danger. Their zeal is actually something that has to be refined and tuned over the course of numerous guard dog training sessions. Professional guard dog training is typically offered in levels, with the level one training programs costing about $9,000 to $12,500 for a 4 to 6 month course. These courses can be completed during any sort of weather, as they typically are held indoors. Research this activity well so that you understand the end result of this type of training and whether you need your family pet to have such an intensive education.
Step
1
Identifying threats
One of the first things a training will teach a dog to do is learn how to properly identify a potential threat to their family's well being. A trainer will typically wear a bite sleeve before acting as an unknown assailant. In time, a dog will learn to pay special attention to shifty individuals, standing at a attention with their ears perked up and their heads pointed at the potential threat.
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2
Responding to threats
This activity is called guard dog training, not attack dog training. While an Austrian Pinscher will physically engage with a potential threat, they should only do so if someone's life is, without a doubt, in danger. Typically, the proper way that a guard dog should respond to a potential threat is to bark at them - your Austrian Pinscher should be able to bark at a person or another animal that they perceive as a threat until said threat has exited the premises.
Step
3
Restraint
The trickiest thing about teaching a canine how to be a guard dog is getting them not to bark at everything or everyone that approaches them. To that end, your dog's trainer will continue to drill your Austrian Pinscher throughout the training course until they've learned to distinguish friend from potential foe.
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Four-legged Farmhand

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Sunny Day
Cheap
Hard
45 - 60 min
Items needed
Training Clicker
Dog Treats
Activity description
At the very beginning of this guide, we mentioned that Austrian Shepherds were initially bred to help farmers out with their everyday tasks. Since Austrian Pinschers are genetically predisposed to excel at farm work, it will be easier to teach one of these dogs how to essentially be a canine farmhand; one can teach an Austrian Pinscher to retrieve and put away certain tools, herd livestock animals, and alert others of potential danger. You won't need to buy too many pieces of fancy equipment for this activity; in fact, you can actually manage without buying anything other than some dog treats, but we recommend picking up a training clicker to ease things along. We also recommend training your dog during the day, where everything will be nice and visible.
Step
1
Tools of the trade
You'll need to teach your dog how to distinguish certain tools from one another before they can head out and retrieve them on request. This step isn't too complicated - get one of your tools before getting your pet's attention, say the name of the tool while gesturing to it, then ask your dog to pick up the tool after you lay it down. If your Austrian Pinscher plucks it off the ground, they've successfully learned how to identify that particular tool. Some pet parents use the clicker to signal that the task has been achieved.
Step
2
Tool retrieval
This step is really more about teaching your Austrian Pinscher to memorize the location where you keep your tools stored. Once you're able to teach your dog the basic geography of your place of dwelling - be it a farmhouse or a suburban home - they'll be able to memorize where you keep your equipment. From there, your dog should instinctively head to that area when you ask them to retrieve a certain tool.
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Visit Austria

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Any Day
Expensive
Easy
8 hrs
Items needed
Leash
Bedding
Food and Water
Activity description
There are quite a few dog friendly locales in Austria, the homeland of this guide's namesake, as well as a plethora of fun activities that would make a trip to the Eastern Realm well worth the time and effort. Dogs are welcome inside most restaurants in Austria, so long as pet parents keep their animals leashed and looked after. The cost of a trip to Austria varies depending on the time of year you plan to visit, as well as the duration of your stay, but you're best off saving up at least $1,000 to cover your travelling expenses. Austria is beautiful year round, so feel free to visit during whichever season you can.
Step
1
Gasthof Neue Post
This hotel is nestled right beside Obergurgl - a snowy mountain where visitors can go skiing and snowboarding to their hearts' content. The hotel will allow visitors to bring up to two dogs with them for a fee of 8 Euros per night. The place is typically best visited during the snowier seasons of the year, as the Gasthof Neue Post was designed to act as something of a winter hospice.
Step
2
Airwalk Kolnbreinsperre
If neither you or your dog have a fear of heights then visiting this popular tourist attraction may be right up your alley. As its name implies, the Airwalk is a high altitude manmade bridge of sorts that overlooks the Kolnbrein Dam. You and your pet are best off visiting this attraction during sunnier seasons of the year, where you'll have a clear view of the surrounding area.
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More Fun Ideas...

Lure Coursing

Austrian Pinschers can really put the paw to the metal if they're properly incentivized. Lure coursing is all about coaxing dogs to run as fast as they can by stringing up a lure and moving it across vast stretches of land. The speed, coordination, and agility of a dog who participates in a lure coursing session will be put to the test - ultimately resulting in a faster, more sure-footed pet.

Hellbrunn Palace

If you've got any plans to visit Austria, or if you're already in the area, then you should consider visiting the Hellbrunn Palace in the city of Salzburg. Dogs are permitted to play in the palace's large park areas as well as cool off near the trick fountain near the front of the venue.

Conclusion

In our opinion, Austrian Pinschers have got just about everything a person could need in a dog - these pups are very friendly, incredibly intelligent, fiercely loyal, and open to trying out new things. Austrian Pinschers make great companions for folks who live in rural or suburban areas - anywhere that's got a lot of wide open space for one of these guys to run around in. Smaller places like apartment complexes without patio areas aren't exactly ideal for an Austrian Pinscher but one can manage if they take their dog outdoors on a regular basis. To that end, be prepared to spend a lot of time at the park, as Austrian Pinschers have loads of energy.