Activities For Ciobanesc Romanesc Carpatins

1k Views
0 Comments
0 Votes

Introduction

If you’re looking for one of the most loyal canine companions out there, you could do a lot worse than a Ciobanesc Romanesc Carpatin! Also known as the Carpathian Shepherd Dog, these buddies were bred to mind livestock in the mountains of Eurasia, and they take their job very seriously -- you can’t get more dedicated than a doggo that’s been known to fight bears to protect their flock! Not only that, but there’s no denying that their lupine features are gorgeous -- take a look at that fluff!

Ciobanesc Romanesc Carpatins do pose some challenges. Though they’re highly intelligent, they possess a strong stubborn streak, are terrible barkers, and need a lot of mental and physical exercise. Don’t worry -- we’ve put together a list of activities guaranteed to keep your pupper healthy and entertained!

Go Camping

Popular
0 Votes
Sunny Day
Moderate
Easy
2 - 3 days
Items needed
Leash
Tent
Tweezers
Collapsible water bowls
Activity description

Many people love the romantic idea of heading off into the wilderness alone, but are put off by the safety concerns. Not to worry -- your loyal Ciobanesc Romanesc Carpatin will be sure to keep you safe from harm!

Or if you’re just looking for a family vacation with those you love most, camping is often a furrifically Fido-friendly option.

Not only that, but a change of scenery is great for your doggo. Exposing them to new sights, sounds and smells is a good way to keep their brain engaged, and it’s even better if you can combine it with exercise (like a nice long hike)!

Step
1
Do your research
While more campgrounds (particularly US Army Corps or Forest Service sites) are fur-friendly than not, there are still some hold-outs out there, and many charge a separate pet fee. Make sure that your staying spot of choice welcomes wagging tails before you book! Another thing to consider is the activities in the area. While many National Park campgrounds allow dogs, a lot of them have pet restrictions on their trails, or don’t allow hound-dog hikers at all.
Step
2
Pack your gear
You’ll need to make sure your pupper is well provided for during your trip! At the very least you’ll need two collapsible bowls, one for food and one for water, and plenty of wet food or kibble. Remember to store the latter in airtight containers if you’re camping in bear country! You’ll also need to bring a leash. A pair of tweezers is highly recommended if there are ticks in the area. Booties are a good idea if you’ll be heading out on rocky trails and worry about your pooch’s paws.
Step
3
Have fun!
After you’ve pitched your tent, you two can hit the trails, cast a line in a river or lake, or simply sit back and chill out with your furry friend as you take in the world around you. Sometimes a pup and their person just have to get back to nature.
Love this activity?

Teach Them to Retrieve

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Cheap
Hard
30 min
Items needed
Treats
Toys
Activity description

Teaching your doggo to retrieve is a pawesome way to give their brain something to chew on! You’ll be showing them how to identify an item, grab it and bring it to you, whether that be a favorite toy before playtime or your slippers before you get out of bed. Your buddy’s brain will relish the mental challenge, and you get your own doggy butler!

Like all training exercises, this can take a while for your pup to grasp. The time estimate we’ve mentioned refers to the time per training session -- though these dogs are certainly bright, it could take them days or weeks to get this trick down pat!

Step
1
Play the name game
First, you’ll have to show your pooch how to identify various objects. It’s best to start with a single item first, specifically something that they can get excited about -- a favorite ball or chew toy, for example. Hold the toy in front of your dog’s nose and call it by its name. Reward them with a treat every time they touch it with their nose or take it into their mouth. Next, you’ll need to move the item further away from you. Place the item halfway across the room and call the name of the item. Give them a treat every time they pick it up! Over the next few sessions, you can add more items to the mix.
Step
2
Teach them to bring it back
If your buddy has a firm grasp of fetch, they should already know how to come when called, pick up an item, and drop it at your feet, and these are the commands you should use to get them to bring the object back to you. Reward them when they get it right, but only then! After a while, you can start spacing out your rewards before abandoning them entirely.
Love this activity?

Watchdog Classes

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Moderate
Hard
1 hr
Items needed
Activity description

Ciobanesc Romanesc Carpatins weren’t just bred for herding livestock -- they were also expected to alert farmers to dangerous predators. Of course, when your pup is young, danger is anything that’s strange to them. The booming bark of a Ciobanesc Romanesc Carpatin can be heard for miles -- and you want to avoid having severely irritated neighbors.

Watch-dog or guard-dog training harnesses your pup’s natural instincts to teach them "mindful barking" -- i.e., to bark only when legitimate danger is near. It can also train aggression out of antsy or mistrustful pooches.

Step
1
Investigate classes in your area
Some trainers offer private lessons, but open classes provide a great op-paw-tunity to socialize your pupper with other dogs. You’ll also want to make sure your trainer is properly accredited -- at the moment, anyone can call themselves a dog trainer, whether they’re qualified or not. Look for qualifications from institutions like the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior or the American Animal Hospital Association.
Step
2
Be prepared to practice
The sad fact is that an hour or a couple of hours a week isn’t going to be enough to cement a learned behavior in your dog’s mind. You’ll have to take the time to go through the commands at home. Your pup will pick up their training more quickly, and get used to you being the one who gives the orders.
Love this activity?

More Fun Ideas...

Flyball

Flyball is another canine sport that herding dogs often excel in. Your pup will need to traverse an obstacle course before retrieving a ball from a spring-loaded box. Again, this can be difficult to do at home without purchasing equipment -- it’s best to look for classes.

Treibball

Treibball, or doggy soccer, is a paw-fect activity for herding dogs of all stripes. Rather than herding livestock, your pupper will be learning how to push a large exercise ball into a goal. The rules of Treibball are rather complicated -- while you can certainly do some training in your own backyard, it’s a good idea to look for teams in your area if you and your furry friend would like to get serious about the sport.

Conclusion

Owning a Ciobanesc Romanesc Carpatin can be a very rewarding experience -- these doggos are absolutely devoted. While keeping them entertained can be difficult, it's by no means impossible. The activities above should give you a good idea of what to do to keep your furry friend as healthy and happy as can be. Give them a try!