Activities For Dameranians

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Introduction

Dameranians are a cross-breed of Dachshunds and Pomeranians. Despite their small size, Dameranians are active little dogs who require around 30 minutes of exercise per day. They are prone to separation anxiety and shouldn’t be left alone for a long stretch of time.

When using their parent breeds as an example, Dameranians are friendly, loving dogs. The Pomeranian genes can cause your pup to be a barker and suffer from small-dog syndrome, where they often forget their size and show aggression or dominance around larger dogs.

The history of the Dachshund dates back to the 15th century when they were bred to hunt badgers. Their long bodies and short legs allowed them to enter the dens. They later became more of a companion than a working dog, thanks to English royalty taking a liking to the breed.

Pomeranians have been popular since the time of Michelangelo, Mozart and Queen Victoria, all of whom owned the little spitfires.

Indoor Obstacle Course

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Cheap
Easy
30 min
Items needed
Tunnels
Hurdles
Stairs
Activity description

Dameranians are fiery little pups with more energy than you’d think for having short legs. Working off that extra energy in an indoor obstacle course will be fun for your dog and provide them with the attention they crave from you. Dogs need mental stimulation as well as physical activity. Obstacle courses make your dogs use their intelligence to fulfill the commands you’ve given them.

An amateur indoor obstacle course can start with easy obstacles and work up from there. If you have a fenced-in yard, you can set up the activity outside. Setting the course up indoors prevents the weather from interrupting your pup’s exercise time. You can use household items for different obstacles. Use treats to encourage your pup through the course.

Step
1
Set up a tunnel obstacle
You can use a kid-sized tunnel for small dogs like Dameranians. The tunnels can be set up straight at first and then into a curve once your pup gets the hang of the course. If you’re crafty, you can build your own tunnel by sewing patches or fabric together or using old laundry hampers. Once your dog is familiar with the course, change up the order of the obstacles. This will help your dog learn the hand or verbal command for each obstacle instead of following a learned pattern.
Step
2
Make a hurdle obstacle
If you watch dog agility competitions, you’ve seen dogs of all sizes leap over hurdles or through tire jumps. Tire jumps in your living room is a bit unrealistic, but you can use leftover PVC pipes to make small hurdles. However, any type of hurdle that you use should be collapsible in case Fido has a hard time jumping over it. Once your dog has learned the hurdle, you can incorporate a hoop.
Step
3
Use the stairs
If your home has stairs, you can use them to have your pup run up and down them. It’s a great way to exercise your dog on rainy days. At first, you will most likely have to run up and down the stairs with your dog chasing behind you, but you can also use a toy, such as a ball for them to fetch. Pretty soon, they'll master the stairs better than you have!
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Socialize

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Sunny Day
Free
Easy
30 mins
Items needed
"Pet Me" Vest
Harness
Dog Biscuits
Activity description

When you own a dog, it’s your responsibility to teach your pup manners when they are around both humans and other dogs. To do that, your dog needs to be socialized from a young age so they learn appropriate behavior. Even though it’s “cute” when small dogs jump up on human’s thighs, if it’s not acceptable for large dogs, it shouldn’t be tolerated for small dogs.

The Pomeranian side of your Dameranian could make your pup aggressive and dominant towards larger dogs. If properly socialized, your dog should be fine around any other dog.

Pomeranians can also be snippy with young kids because kids don’t always know how to be gentle with small dogs. Your Dameranian can be trained to accept young kids and their unintentional carelessness.

Socializing involves supervised contact between your pup and other dogs and people. This can be done for free or with training classes. Most dogs hate rain, so if the socialization occurs outdoors, make sure the weather is nice. Thirty minutes is a good time limit per socialization activity so that Fido doesn’t get overwhelmed.

Step
1
Introduce your pup to other dogs
The best way to introduce your dog to other dogs is with professionally-led training classes. You don’t want to take your unsocialized dog to the dog park immediately. Other dogs (and your dog) can be unpredictable when let off-leash and if a scuffle breaks out, it can be hard to stop it if you’re far away. Once your dog has mastered training class, then you can start using the dog parks and puppy playdates.
Step
2
Find a dog-friendly business
When it’s time to introduce your dog to other people, dog-friendly places of business are the perfect place to go. This should be done after your dog has completed a training class and has a grasp of commands such as “down” and “sit.” Many hardware stores allow dogs. It really depends on where you live. If you live in a big city, some restaurants have outdoor seating that is dog-friendly, but that means your dog needs manners not to jump on tables or steal food. You can use the "pet me" vest to let others know your dog is approachable.
Step
3
Meet the neighbors
When you get a new dog, it’s a nice thing to introduce your neighbors to your dog. This sets up a potential dog sitter in the future, but also gives your dog a chance to work on their socialization skills. If you live in an apartment, it also endears your neighbors to the new dog that is most likely causing a racket. You can meet your neighbors by taking walks in your neighborhood or taking your pup to the local (dog-friendly) park.
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Go For a Stroll

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Sunny Day
Free
Easy
30 min
Items needed
Harness
Leash
Treats
Activity description

Dameranians are easy dogs. They are active, but also prefer to be with their human family as much as possible. Taking your dog for a stroll lets you bond with your pup while they get the required exercise. You can make the walk fun for your dog by letting their nose lead the way.

If you live in a warmer climate, it’s better to walk your dog early in the morning or late at night to avoid heat stroke. Walking is cheap or free, once you’ve purchased the necessary leash and harness.

You can change up the scenery for your dog by taking walks through the neighborhood one day and then going on a short hike the next. Dogs are creatures of habit, but they can also get bored, just as humans can.

Step
1
Choose the right harness
Small dogs should be walked with a harness. The harness goes around their doggie torso instead of their fragile neck. Many small dog breeds, such as Dachshunds and Pomeranians, are prone to damage to their trachea from the stress of wearing collars. Harnesses should be snug, but not uncomfortable or loose.
Step
2
Grab the leash
Once your pup is in their harness, grab the leash and set out for the walk. Retractable leashes aren’t recommended by experts because they can break or injure the dog and human. Your pup might be small, but they also have a high prey drive and can take off unexpectedly when they see a smaller animal.
Step
3
Map your route
Mapping the route of your walk lets you avoid neighborhood dogs that might be unfriendly toward Fido. You can also remember your dog’s favorite spots to do their business, as some dogs are a bit strange about going in unfamiliar places. Others go on any tree or bush they walk by. Don’t forget the doggie bags!
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More Fun Ideas...

Digging Pit

Dogs love to dig in general, but the Dachshund parent of the Dameranian was originally bred to dig into dens and other confined areas to hunt wild animals. You can create a designated digging area in your yard to keep your dog from digging up your flowers and lawn. Outline the digging area with bricks or wood and fill the area with loose dirt. Encourage your pup to dig in the designated area by burying bones or toys.

Game of chase

Dameranians have a history of chasing badgers and foxes into dens, meaning they love a good game of chase. To play, wrap a string around your pup’s favorite toy and drag the toy behind you as your dog chases the toy. Remember, don't ever let your dog chase you! This game can be done indoors or outdoors, so weather is not a factor. Rope toys are really useful for this activity. You can also alternate between chasing and tugging.

Conclusion

Dameranians inherit a combination of traits from Dachshunds and Pomeranians. Most likely, you will have a playful little pup who loves attention and exercise. Despite their little legs, Dameranians love to go for walks and excel at indoor obstacles courses that you wouldn’t expect, such as hurdles and tunnels.

Poms and Dachshunds are known to be very social dogs who love everyone -- and the feeling is mutual! Having a well-behaved dog is an essential part of owning a Dameranian. Socializing them at a young age allows them to be trusted around children and other dogs without the pup getting snippy.

The Dachshund part of your Dameranian got their start as a digger, so Fido would love any type of digging destination. Search for new and exciting ways to keep your Dameranian entertained, and your pup will pawsitively love you for it!