Activities For Dogs In Wyoming On Rainy Days

1k Views
0 Comments
0 Votes

Introduction

Believe it or not, when it comes to precipitation, Wyoming is about as dry as it gets. In both summer and winter, The Equality State is almost equally devoid of precipitation, ranking no lower than seventh on the list of driest in the country, maxing out at about 2.5 inches between May and June (and ranking just third overall on a yearly basis). But that doesn't mean residents and visitors don't experience rainy days, it just means they don't happen as often or stay as long as they do in other parts of the country. But when they appear, you'll still need things to do, which is why we're here, to give you some clever ways to overcome the elements and enjoy your days regardless, so you'll never lose your date with the Cowboy State.

Wet Wags

Popular
0 Votes
Rainy Day
Moderate
Normal
45 - 180 min
Items needed
Dog Bags
Leash
Doggy Life Vest
Towels
Activity description
It's hard to argue that Wyoming isn't a state of natural wonders. It holds part of Yellowstone, the Grand Tetons and Hot Springs amongst others, making it a true destination for outdoor adventure seekers. But depending on the weather, some might be more apt to just wait for a better day or time. However, if you plan to do any activities that already involve getting wet, such as kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding or anything else of the like, there are few reasons NOT to do it on a rainy day (barring any lightning). You'll avoid more crowds, you'll already likely be getting wet, so the rain isn't likely to make you that much wetter, and on top of all that, most rainy days in Wyoming happen during the warmest months of the year, meaning you can avoid hot weather and still not freeze. It may not be cheap depending on the activity and rental costs, but it's relatively easy and a ton of fun.
Step
1
Consider your canine
Before we can claim this to be a universal activity, you should closely consider what kind of dog you have. If they're not one for getting wet or being adventurous, this one might not be for you. For dogs who will try new things, learn quickly and don't mind a bit of water, it's perfect. If you've decided your dog is a good candidate, think about their past experiences and what might suit them best between the activities we listed. Some dogs prefer the enclosed sides of a kayak while others like the visibility of paddle boards (plus the ability to jump in, swim and get in or out easily). If they have no prior experience but you think they might be okay, you can either risk it the day of, try out a friend's (if they have any) or request a trial run to see if they'll do alright.
Step
2
Secure your craft
Once you've deemed your dog a good fit, find somewhere to make reservations. Our best suggestion is Cody Wyoming Adventures, as they are known to be super dog-friendly and accommodating. Plus, they offer private and customized tours, so if you want to do or see more with the experience of a guide, you've got more than enough options available. When you make the reservations, whether online, by phone or in person, it's best to provide details on your dog as well, such as their breed, size, energy level and personality, as this will help them provide more insight as to how to make your trip more fun or successful (or any other gear you might want to procure beforehand).
Step
3
Embark
Once you've made your reservations, you can pack your supplies and depart for your trip when appropriate. We suggest checking the weather on a regular basis in case it turns for the better or worse, which could alter your plans. And don't forget to pack towels! Just because you'll both be getting wet doesn't make having a wet dog in the car any more fun. Make sure if your dog is inexperienced to take your first trip slow and steady for their comfort and have them wear a life vest just in case. You might get to do less the first time out, but the slower and more enjoyable you can make it for them the first time or two through, the more you'll get to do on subsequent trips, in rain or shine!
Love this activity?

Drizzle Hike

Popular
0 Votes
Rainy Day
Cheap
Easy
45 - 180 min
Items needed
Leash
Dog Bags
Raincoats (dog and human)
Umbrella
Waterproof shoes/boots
Activity description
Yes, rain can ruin a hike. But, like in the example above, it can also prove to be a considerable benefit if you're appropriately prepared. While dogs may not be allowed on unpaved paths in the National Parks, they are allowed in the National Forests, which are arguably just as gorgeous and fun to hike. With the right rain, the right gear and the right trail, you can have just as much fun hiking in the rain. You can avoid crowds, excessive heat, dust and dryness, and best of all, rain saturates an already colorful landscape that will shine that much more brightly if and when the rain finally fades (and sometimes even when it doesn't). Plus, all you need is a little extra gear beyond your normal hiking supplies, making it a cheap to moderate investment that will save you from being deterred by rainy days in the future.
Step
1
Pick your path
Picking the right place to go is a matter of both preference and safety. If it's only a drizzle, you shouldn't have trouble on most trails. With a heavy downpour, you may want to avoid narrow paths and steep drops, whether walking under or over them, as dangerous washouts can occur. Otherwise, much of it comes down to taste and proximity. Our best three suggestions are Devil's Staircase for its range of difficulty, grade and inherent beauty (it's as much rock as it is dirt), Table Mountain for its color and ease (the last chunk is a bit steeper so you'll have to gauge conditions) and Sleeping Indian for just about all of the above. Make sure to watch the weather closely to keep track of its movement and intensity, as you may want to plan around its length and severity.
Step
2
Gather your gear
If you already do a fair amount of hiking, you may have a good amount of gear on hand, though you may need to add some good waterproof elements to stay comfortable and dry. Consider a rain jacket for yourself and your dog, an umbrella if you plan to stay extra dry, a shammy to dry off easily and some shoes or boots with good grips or tread. If you use a smartphone to track your hikes or navigate, there are inexpensive waterproof bags that work perfectly for this kind of thing. If you need any of this extra gear, think about going to a chain outdoors store like Cabela's or Bass Pro Shops or pet shops as well, as many are dog-friendly and will provide that much more to do out of the rain.
Step
3
Spike the hike
Once you've picked your spot and grabbed your gear, it's time to hit the road. Continue checking the weather and planning your trip accordingly to maximize safety and comfort. Once you arrive, don the remainder of your gear and hit the trails! There are plenty of great ways to take advantage of the rain, including getting some great photos many others may not be brave enough to take. There is waterproof gear for just about every vocation, so don't hesitate to bring your interests to the outdoors even when it pours!
Love this activity?

Road Trip

Popular
0 Votes
Rainy Day
Moderate
Easy
1 - 6 hrs
Items needed
Dog Bags
Leash
Umbrella
Towels
Activity description
If you have a dog that's patient and does well during car rides, there are few better things to do than take a road trip, given the conditions are driving-safe. Wyoming is the perfect state for it as well, as in between curious roadside attractions, the natural beauty is unrelenting and won't fail to impress in nearly all corners. It will not only give you hours of things to do together, including the driving itself and exploring places you stop, but keep things relatively cheap and easy. Unless you choose to find a place to grab some food, it's only as expensive as gas and offers a lot more to see than just sticking to one park or area.
Step
1
Attraction by subtraction
Before anything else, you should first consider what you'd like to see, where you'd like to go and whether those places will be dog-friendly. Start by eliminating any that aren't or at least figuring out what the restrictions are per location. Just because you can't walk on certain ground doesn't mean you can't experience the fun or excitement anyway. Make a thorough list of all the places you'd like to stop. As far as unique things to see, we suggest places like Devil's Tower, Smith's Mansion, the Fossil Bone Cabin and Little America, as they can be enjoyed from afar and up close if allowed. Once you've made a hefty list, throw them into a mapping app or site online and see where most of them fall. Decide how long or far you want to drive, then start eliminating any that are too far out of the way. You should be able to whittle your list down to a favorable driving time.
Step
2
Plot points
Once you've figured out where you want to go, you should figure out your timing and where to stop in between. If you're driving through your normal lunch hours, see if you can find a dog-friendly covered patio on the way where the two of you can grab a bite. If nothing else, find a stop with dog-appropriate food that you can eat in the car (or bring dog food with if need be). There are plenty of places to stop and shop as well as rest stops, parks and dog parks that will allow you both to get out and stretch your legs. Identify these places on a map and either plan on stopping or gauge your and your dog's comfort during the drive, then make those decisions on the fly.
Step
3
Hit the road
Once you've got everything planned out, double check the weather to see if your plans will or can be altered for the better or worse, then change course appropriately. You can also do the same during your stops along the way, which means you can cater your activities to the type of rain overhead. If nothing else, remember to bring a camera and an umbrella so you can capture your adventures and revisit them on another rainy day that you don't feel like getting out. More than anything else, have fun! As long as it's not a massive storm, the rain shouldn't stop you from getting out of the house or enjoying yourselves.
Love this activity?

More Fun Ideas...

Shop-pup

When all else fails, find a dog-friendly store to go shopping at. You can grab some new rain gear or just spend some time trying to find some new treats, toys, food, beds or anything else your dog might want or need.

Adventure Prep

If the weather is just too bad to get outside, do your best to take advantage of the down time. Consider planning your next trip so you don't waste any time on nicer days or work on training your and your dog's body to endure more strenuous hikes with workouts.

Conclusion

Wyoming may not see a ton of rainy days, but when they do finally appear, it can be hard not to feel discouraged if you have outdoor plans looming. But realistically, it's no reason to fret. Wyoming has plenty of activities and natural beauty to enjoy even if you don't want to get soaked. All it takes is a little extra planning and a few extra pieces of gear and you and your dog will be on your way to having a great (even if rainy) day.