Activities For Irish Red And White Setters

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Introduction

Irish Red and White Setters may be less well known than their all red cousins, but these dogs are just as loveable and loyal. This dog was born to run, so activities for Irish Red and White Setters must include lots of exercise to keep them happy. They were originally bred to hunt and do well-finding birds and other small game in wooded and marshy areas. Hiking trails and running along open land should be part of their weekly routine. These dogs are excellent family pets and love being part of the family. They are often rambunctious as puppies so they should be supervised with younger children.

Distance Trail Running

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Sunny Day
Free
Normal
1 - 2 hrs
Items needed
Leash
Treats
Doggy waste bags
Activity description
If you're looking for a training partner that can stay with you for hours of long-distance running, your Irish Red and White Setter is the dog for the task. Distance running is one of the best activities for Irish Red and White Setters because they were built for constant movement. They will happily jog alongside you over miles of trails. In fact, they might even double your distance as they follow scents off trail and check back in with you. Your training partner will be happy to keep you motivated to the end of the run and wind down on the couch by your side to recover.
Step
1
Basic training
Before you head off into the woods with your dog, make sure they have a good handle of basic training. Irish Red and White Setters can run for miles and have a high scent drive. Make sure they have a good recall so they don't head off into the woods after a scent and get lost. They should also be able to sit and stay. When you meet horses or bikers on the trail, you should be able to keep your dog under control and off the trail until they safely pass you by.
Step
2
Start small
Make sure the first trail runs you bring your furry partner on are little easier and shorter to begin with. Some dogs will run longer than they can handle. You want to slowly build up steepness and distance so your dog gets stronger without hurting themselves, just like you would condition yourself before heading out on a challenging trail. If you can find a trail that has access to water for your dog, they will be very happy. On hot days your dog can keep themselves cool by jumping in a creek or lake and drinking whenever they are thirsty.
Step
3
Set a goal
Now that you have a dependable training partner who won't snooze the alarm, set a goal for the summer. Pick a challenging trail run or distance and make a plan to complete it by the end of the summer. With your Irish Red and White Setter by your side, you'll be able to push harder than you thought possible. On mornings when you don't want to get up, their excited puppy breath will get you out of bed and on to the trail. When you complete that long distance or challenging run, you'll be able to celebrate together.
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Flyball

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Any Day
Moderate
Normal
1 hr
Items needed
Treats
Ball
Hurdles
Ball launcher
Activity description
Flyball is a fast-paced team relay for dogs that combines agility with obedience and speed. Each dog on the team must jump over three hurdles to reach a flyball box. Then, they step on the box to release a tennis ball. They catch the ball in their mouth and race back through the hurdles. Once they clear the hurdles, the next dog takes their turn. Flyball is one of the best activities for Irish Red and White Setters because it combines their fast speed with mental challenge and teamwork. Joining a flyball team will be a fun activity for you and your dog, and it will help strengthen your bond and trust.
Step
1
Find a team
The first step is to find a local flyball club or form a team. Teams can be made up of all different breeds. You can even have smaller dogs on your team. The hurdles are set at the height of the smallest dog. During team meetings, you'll learn more of the rules of the game, and your dog will have plenty of time to socialize and play with other pups.
Step
2
Teach the basics
While flyball looks complicated during the competition, each piece can be broken down into an easily teachable component. First, your dog will need to learn to pick up and drop a ball. Next, you will teach them to catch a ball when you toss it to them. The next step is to introduce the box. Flyball boxes have a step that the dog presses to release the ball. It won't take long to teach your dog to press the step and catch the ball. Once they have the ball work down you can introduce them to hurdles. The hurdles might be the easiest part for the speedy Irish Red and White Setter. When you have all the pieces in place, put them together, and you are ready.
Step
3
Enter a flyball competition
After each part of your team has mastered the basics, it's time to put your new skills to the test. Flyball competitions are just as much about having fun as they are about speed and winning. Enter your team in the novice class for your first competition. Try your best, but remember to have plenty of fun during the competition. You can't predict how your dog will react, but the first competition will give you plenty to work on with your dog in the future.
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Tracking

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Sunny Day
Moderate
Normal
1 hr
Items needed
Treats
Flagging
Big reward
Activity description
Activities for Irish Red and White Settlers that utilize their natural instincts will challenge them physically and mentally. These dogs are often used as hunting dogs because they have a great sense of smell and drive to find prey. You can tap into these traits by teaching your dog to track and follow scent trails. These dogs are not as apt to wander far from their owners while following a scent like many hounds, and they really excel at tracking in wooded and wet areas. Tracking can be a fun activity for the whole family, and once your dog knows how to follow a trail, you can let the kids go wild setting their own scent trails and cheering on your dog as they try to follow it.
Step
1
Teach "find it"
The first step in honing your dog's natural tracking instincts is to teach them "find it." This command will help you get them back on track when they wander off the trail. Start by cutting up a few hot dogs into small pieces. Feed them a few pieces of hot dog, then drop a piece in the grass a little ways from them. Say "find it" and encourage them to search for the hot dog. Keep challenging them by placing the hot dog piece a little farther away or hiding it without the dog seeing where you put it.
Step
2
Tracking basics
To start, use cut up pieces of hot dogs, these are high reward treats that have a strong scent. Crush a piece under your shoe and start walking to create a path. Every few steps, drop a hot dog piece to let them know they are on the right track. At the end of the short track, leave a toy with a hot dog on top of it as the reward. Encourage the dog to follow the trail to the toy. If they get off track, use "find it" to encourage them to find the hot dog.
Step
3
Increase the difficulty
Once your dog is following several short, straight tracks, you can increase the difficulty. Make the tracks a little longer each time and add in curves. You can use flagging to mark the trail so you don't lose track yourself. You can drop additional toys along the way, but only put the hot dog reward on the end toy. As your dog hones their skills, you'll be amazed at what they can find.
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More Fun Ideas...

Fetch

Your dog needs at least 60 minutes of exercise each day. Playing fetch with a "chuck it" is a great way to get your dog running and playing as much as they need.

Family Movie Night

Irish Red and White Setters were made for family movie night cuddling with the kids. These dogs love to be with family and will be happy to cuddle up under blankets during your favorite dog-themed movie.

Conclusion

Activities for Irish Red and White Setters should include plenty of exercise and a little bit of mental challenge too. These dogs were built to run and love nothing more than long lopes through the woods on a hike, a hunt, or a trail run with their owners, except maybe hanging out with their families. If you are lucky enough to own one of these dogs you know that they are sweet and loyal, but require lots of time for running. Whether you plan to hunt, track, or run with your dog you'll always have a happy companion by your side.