Activities For Kishu Kens

1k Views
0 Comments
0 Votes

Introduction

The Kishu Ken breed, also referred to as the Kishu Inu, is one of only a few breeds to be developed in Japan. These dogs developed as hunting dogs in the Kishu region at some point prior to written records, and they were recognized as a national monument in 1934 when the breed was first officially standardized. They are intelligent and resourceful, with a great deal of energy and stamina and they require both physical and mental exercise on a daily basis.

Canine Freestyle Dance

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Moderate
Normal
15 - 45 min
Items needed
Music
Props (optional)
Activity description

The creative and artistic activity of canine freestyle dance incorporates a dog as a central performer in a musical dance routine, entertaining the audience with tricks and specialized heelwork. These routines, carefully choreographed by the dog’s handler, can be either humorous or dramatic in scope and can range from simple to complex. While the entertaining activity first gained notice in the 1980s, it wasn’t until 1991 that the first official Canine Freestyle Dance organization was formed in British Columbia. Kishu Ken breed dogs are very agile and surefooted with an extreme sense of loyalty to their owners. While they are sometimes strong-willed, firm and consistent training methods are typically effective, and they thrive when given a job to do. 

Step
1
Veterinary visit
While this activity does not need to be as physically demanding as some other dog sport based activities, there can be a fair amount of intense activity, including standing on their hind legs, jumping, and leaping. Pet parents who are considering this activity for their dogs should ensure that they have been cleared by the veterinarian for this activity. If your dog is still in their adolescence between eighteen months and two years old, your veterinarian should check to ensure that their growth plates in their bones have matured to prevent permanent damage to their bones and joints.
Step
2
Choreograph
There are two separate categories that Canine Freestyle can be broken down into; freestyle heeling to music is performed with the dog remaining in a close heel position to the human performer at all times whereas musical freestyle can include several different types of tricks and commands that may include jumping over objects, rolling over, and even standing on their hind legs along with heelwork like you would see with freestyle heeling to music. Once you have determined which form of freestyle you and your Kishu Ken will be performing, you can choose a piece of music and begin the process of choreography, always keeping your dog’s capabilities in mind. If your dog appears to be distressed or in pain, adjust the choreography to fit their needs.
Step
3
Perform
After you and your canine partner have practiced and mastered the choreographed routine, you can choose to perform it for a larger audience. Many performers find it useful to demonstrate the routine for friends and family at least once or twice for feedback before advancing to larger audiences. Larger competitions hosted by the major kennel clubs have large audiences and may even be televised, and while some individuals are comfortable jumping right into these larger competitions, others prefer to start with smaller venues, such as local competitions hosted by dog sport clubs and other enthusiasts. It may be a good idea to attend a competition as a spectator in order to better understand the experience before performing.
Love this activity?

Hide and Seek

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Free
Easy
5 - 30 min
Items needed
Leash
Activity description

Hide and seek is a favorite childhood game for many people and can easily be modified to play with your dog. Dogs with strong bonds to their chosen human will often find this game to be very satisfying, as it provides mental stimulation and helps to strengthen critical thinking skills as well as reinforcing the bond between you and your canine companion. This game is also a good way to encourage bonding between not only your Kishu’s favorite chosen person but also with other family members like children who play the game with you. The other nice thing about this activity is that it is a good way to entertain you and your pooch, without costing you anything but time.

Step
1
To treat or not to treat
High-value treats are also high in calories, fat, and salt and should be given sparingly. Pet parents who reach for a favorite treat to reward their dog for finding them will often discover that their dog will lose interest if the treats cease. If not conditioned to expect treats for this activity, many dogs will happily continue playing the game just for the approval and praise that they get when they find their target.
Step
2
Hiding
When first teaching your dog how to play this game, you will want to keep it pretty simple. Start with just one person hiding, generally in a fairly easy hiding place somewhere in your house or yard, possibly even a spot that is partially visible. As your dog gets the idea, you can start hiding in more difficult spots or including additional family members or friends. It is generally best to increase the complexity at a slow pace in order to avoid frustrating your dog to the point that they just give up on the game.
Step
3
Increasing the challenge
Once your Kishu Ken has mastered the basics of this game, you can increase the challenge in several ways. Along with simply finding more difficult places to hide, you can increase the number of people hiding, or with the help of a friend to hold the leash, you can even take it to a less familiar place like a park or near a hiking trail.
Love this activity?

Rally Obedience

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Moderate
Normal
15 - 60 min
Items needed
Leash
Activity description

Rally Obedience, sometimes simply referred to as Rally-O, is a dog sport that combines elements of both agility and obedience training. It is a team sport involving your dog and a handler, usually the owner, in which the dog navigates a course that includes ten to twenty signs that indicate certain moves or behaviors for the canine to exhibit including sending them over jumps, changing pace, and making turns and spins. The focus of this activity is the bond between the animal and the person, making it an excellent activity for a loyal and intelligent dog like the Kishu Ken. The steps in rally-o can be learned through books and videos but many pet parents prefer to learn from a professional trainer. The cost for professional training can range from fifty dollars to over three hundred dollars, depending on where the lessons are held, whether it involves private lessons or a group class, and how long the course runs. 

Step
1
Find a group or class
While some pet parents prefer to learn the steps for training their rally obedience dogs through the many books and videos that outline the process, many find it faster and more effective to work with a professional trainer or with a training group. Classes are available at most dog sport training facilities, and many private trainers are also able to help direct you, and more casual meet up groups and associations are available in most areas as well. Both the American Kennel Club and World Cynosport Rally Limited, a major organization for Rally Obedience that was founded in 2012, has a searchable list of rally obedience groups and training centers.
Step
2
Train
To receive a qualifying score in rally obedience trials and competitions, your dog will need to master several commands. Commands such as heel, sit, and stay, are commonly known, whereas other commands may be less likely to be seen outside of obedience and agility circles, commands like pivot left or right, changing speed, turn about, figure eights, and even spirals. Once you and your dog are communicating effectively regarding the commands used in the novice category, the two of you will be ready to compete.
Step
3
Visit and compete
Before you and your dog first attempt to compete in a rally obedience trial, you may wish to visit a Rally-O competition as a spectator, either by yourself or with your well-behaved dog. This can give you a clearer idea of what to expect when you are in the ring and if you are able to bring your canine teammate, will help them to acclimate to the sounds and sights at a competition. Most Rally Obedience teams start out in the Novice category then progress through to the Advanced and Excellent categories, competitions which cost between twenty and thirty dollars to enter.
Love this activity?

More Fun Ideas...

Lure Coursing

Lure coursing is a dog sport designed to give sighthounds like the Greyhound and the Saluki a chance to satisfy their urge to hunt by allowing them to chase a plastic lure that is pulled ahead of them in a zig-zag pattern by a series of pullies. While this sport was designed for sighthounds, the Kishu Ken was developed hunt, and in order to catch rabbit and deer, they had to be both fast and agile, making them well suited to this activity.

Advanced Obedience

Training for the Kishu Ken should start early and continue throughout their lives in order to prevent stubborn behaviors from taking hold. They are very intelligent and devoted to their owners, making them excellent candidates for competitive obedience.

Conclusion

The Kishu Ken breed of dog is a tenacious hunter in the field and an exceptionally loyal companion at home. They are both smart and athletic, and although they can sometimes be strong-willed, with gentle but consistent training methods they can thrive and excel at a number of different types of activities.