Activities For Schiller Hounds

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Introduction

There's actually an interesting tidbit of history behind the Schiller Hound's name; originating from Sweden, the first members of this breed were reared up by a farmer named Per Schiller. For the first litter of puppies, Mr. Schiller mixed Standard Swiss Hounds with English Harrier dogs. Greatly pleased by the resulting breed, Mr. Schiller then brought a few pups with him to the first ever Swedish Dog show which took place in 1886. It wouldn't be until 1907 - a few years after Mr. Schiller passed away - that the breed that he helped bring into being would be formally recognized by the Swedish Kennel Club.

Trailblazing

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Sunny Day
Moderate
Hard
1 - 2 hrs
Items needed
Dog Leash
Flags and Poles
Backpack
water and snacks
First Aid Kit
Activity description
Schiller Hounds are known to possess a number of impressive abilities; they have an amazing senseĀ of smell, are very sociable, and are incredibly independent. This activity aims to capitalize on the Schiller Hound's independent nature via giving them a task that they more or less have to do on their own. For this trailblazing activity, you and your dog are going to travel a certain distance, all the while using items like flags or poles to mark your progress. Your Schiller Hound's job will be to carry whichever items you choose to use over the course of the trip - something they will enjoy doing. As this is an outdoor activity, it's best to wait for a sunny day to try it out.
Step
1
Before hitting the trail
Consider where and when you plan on trying this activity. Places like prairies and open ranges are great places to go, so long as they're open to the public and aren't privately owned. If you're looking for a place with more even terrain, there are probably a few hiking trails within the limits of your city - or that are at least nearby. If you do go down that route, you may want to use placement marking items that can naturally be found in the area - like twigs or distinctly shaped rocks.
Step
2
The trail we blaze
Your Schiller Hound's job is to carry the placement marking items along the trail. To that end, you may need to get a dog backpack for them to stash particular kinds of markers inside. Should you do so, then you'll actually need to spend some time getting your pup acclimated to moving around with the bag on their back. We recommend completing a few trails while travelling lightly early on to do this. On any hike, whether long or short, trailblazing or sightseeing, hydrate often and watch for signs of fatigue in your Schiller Hound.
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Selective Scents

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Any Day
Cheap
Normal
45 min
Items needed
Friends and Family's Personal Affects
Personalized Scents
Activity description
The goal of this activity is to teach your dog to associate specific scents with the corresponding members of your inner circle. It might sound a bit complicated but this activity is essentially a memorization game at heart. The scents that you use in this came can be things like a friend's favorite cologne or perfume or you can also implement food items into the mix as well. As the goal is to help your Schiller Hound associate these scents with a specific person, you'll also be repeating names quite a bit. You won't need to spend too much of your own money if you can get your friends and family members involved in the game as well.
Step
1
How to play
The ultimate goal of this activity is to get your dog familiarized with your close friends and family members by letting them smell distinct items that happen to be closely associated with specific people in your inner circle. Say you have a best friend or relative who always wears a particular hat. You'll want to get a hold of that hat and let your dog smell it a few times. The next time the friend or relative who initially possesses the hat comes by, your dog may be able to identify who the friend is by scent alone. This game is useful for teaching pets how to distinguish friends from strangers.
Step
2
Cooperative play
It kind of goes without saying but you should definitely get permission to use an item first. Hopefully, by asking them, the friend or relative in question will not only oblige you but will ask if they can personally get in on the fun. The more, merrier! The next time you are planning a family get together, this game is a neat way to shake things up while also building rapport between your dog and the other members of your family.
Step
3
One at a time
That's really the key to getting this activity to work effectively - don't overload your dog with too many different items at once. Stick to introducing them to one specific item for one specific family member for an extended period of time. To test the efficacy of this game, invite your chums over and see how your dog reacts when they first arrive. If your dog is calm and collected, or even happy and eager, then that means the activity is working. If not, it may be necessary to try a different personal item.
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Dog Sudoku

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Any Day
Cheap
Normal
30 min
Items needed
Dog Sudoku Toy
Dog Treats
Activity description
Along with their impressive sense of smell and independent attitude, Schiller Hounds are incredibly intelligent dogs. The device we're going to be talking aboutĀ - the "My Intelligent Dog's Sudoku Board" - is the perfect sort of tool for honing doggy minds while also rewarding them for their efforts. This board comes in a variety of sizes and is made out of a wooden material that doesn't use any chemicals or components that could be harmful to dogs. The Dog's Sudoku Board isn't meant to be the hardest canine treat toy out there, but it's also far from being the easiest. If you're interested in getting your hands on one, you shouldn't have to pay more than $45 to order one of these toys online.
Step
1
Patterns and openings
While the Dog's Sudoku Board isn't exactly like a traditional board for humans, it will prompt your pet to look for patterns and openings to solve it. Your dog will have to methodically slide each piece of the puzzle around in order to gain access to the treats hidden underneath each of them. That won't be too hard in and of itself, but the real challenge will arise when pieces end up getting stuck to one another. Will your dog recognize what's going on? How will they adapt? This activity is all about problem solving.
Step
2
Mixing things up
On instinct, a dog will only interact with the board until they feel that they've got all the treats they can for it. They'll naturally move each piece around, one by one, until there aren't any treats left to take. You can mix things up by purposely leaving some compartments empty while filling others up with treats to discourage a presumptive attitude in your dog and to reinforce the idea of always checking every nook and cranny.
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More Fun Ideas...

Scented Cup Game

As the name implies, this game will prompt your Schiller Hound to quite literally follow their nose in order to succeed. Get a few cups and then place an item with a strong (and preferably pleasant) aroma underneath one of the cups. Shuffle the cups a few times before asking your dog to pick one.

Cheerios Chase

This activity can serve as a fun and tasty way to reward your dog while also promoting physical fitness. It's also played by scores of toddlers and preschool-aged children who are still trying to get the hang of the whole "eating with utensils thing." After feeding a few Cheerios to your dog, roll a few of them along your floor or carpet - one at a time - to encourage your Schiller Hound to give chase!

Conclusion

The Schiller Hound is an intuitive and friendly dog that will thrive when physically and mentally stimulated every day. Whether out on the trail, playing a scent game inside or in the yard, or working on a challenging puzzle, this dog will prove to be an amiable companion and a dog eager to learn new things.