Activities For Shiba Corgis

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Introduction

Shiba Inus and Corgis are two of the internet's absolute favorite dogs, if the sheer number of memes and videos featuring either of these dog breeds are anything to go by. So, we figured that a large number of you would be stoked to hear that someone crossed both of these popular dogs together to give us the Shiba Corgi!  Shiba Corgis are medium sized dogs that have a lot of personality and style; these dogs like to participate in all sorts of activities with their human companions, so if you're a person who likes a lot of variety in your life then you and the Shiba Corgi will be on the same page.

Inclined Fetch

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Any Day
Cheap
Easy
15 - 20 min
Items needed
Frisbee
Ball
Activity description
Inclined fetch refers to the deceptively simple act of playing fetch with your Shiba Corgi but on an inclined surface, such as a hillside or a sand dune. This activity is not only a lot of fun to play, but it's also a great way to help strengthen your dog's legs; running and jumping around on an incline will make your dog's leg muscles work twice as hard as normal as their bodies adapt to the uneven terrain. We think it's a good idea to engage in this activity in short bursts early on, but you can play for much longer periods as your dog's legs get stronger. The only expense is the frisbee or ball; fetch is a cheap game worth its weight in gold as far as exercise goes.
Step
1
Stretch first
This first step is always a given for any physically intense activities and inclined fetch is no exception. Stretching is a necessary first step in activities like this because it will prevent your dog's legs from cramping up mid game. To stretch your dog's legs, simply take your pup's limbs and gently manipulate them away from their center of mass.
Step
2
Go long (eventually)
One of the major goals of this activity is to help your dog become just as acclimated to playing fetch on a hill as they would be to playing it in the park or at home. You can do this by gradually increasing the distance you toss their frisbee over time, rather immediately going long early on. Gradually adjusting the distance you toss your dog's frisbee allows their body to adapt much more effectively than trying to force sudden change.
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Agility Training

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Any Day
Expensive
Normal
45 min
Items needed
Tunnel
Weave poles
Hurdles
Hoops
Food and Water
Activity description
Agility training is a great way to help your Shiba Corgi become a much more coordinated and well rounded pet by introducing them to a series of obstacles that they'll need to overcome. And we don't mean that in a metaphorical sense either; your dog will genuinely learn to jump over hoops and hurdles, blitz through weave poles, and balance themselves on awkward terrain by the time you help them complete their agility training exercises. You can set up an agility training course on your own; the expense will depend on the type of equipment you buy (or build) but we recommend getting in touch with an experienced agility trainer if you're not really the hands-on type. Doing so will raise the costs but the extra cash output is worth it.
Step
1
Do some research
Whether you want to train your dog in agility on your own or if you're looking to get a professional to help you, you're going to need to do some research first. Look up how you'd go about setting up an agility training course by hand, as well as how much the process will cost, if you're interested in the DIY route. Conversely, use whatever resources you can to find reputable dog trainers near you.
Step
2
Fully commit
Most agility training exercises are intuitive enough to where your dog can figure out how to complete them with enough trial and error. The best way to ensure that your dog will have enough time to figure out a particular activity is fully commit to their training; set aside some time at least 3 or 4 days out of the week for agility training and continue to commit to this schedule until your pup completely finishes their training.
Step
3
Keep the energy going
Even after you finish agility training with your dog for the day, you'll want to keep the energy going by going over a few things with your dog post session. The next time you need your dog to come to you from another room, place a few obstacles in their way to see if they'll use what they've learned while training to reach you. Homemade, simple obstacles will still enable them to practice weaving (use sticks or PVC poles), and a kiddie collapsible tunnel can mimic the real thing.
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Flyball

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Any Day
Moderate
Hard
30 - 45 min
Items needed
Hurdles
Tennis Ball
Flyball Box
Water
Activity description
Flyball is a relatively new activity that was created to help wiry dogs like Shiba Corgis channel their energy in a constructive way. The activity was created only a few decades ago in Southern California by dog trainers who were looking to help their dogs get used to finding and retrieving certain objects for them. This activity has a quite a storied history, as it was first demonstrated on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson all the way back in 1980's. The activity has since become a popular way for dog trainers to help canines refine their agility as well as their ability to focus on completing goals with razor sharp focus.
Step
1
How to play flyball
The main thing you need to play flyball is a device known as a flyball box; it's a press and release mechanism that holds balls in place until enough pressure is applied to a pedal located at the base of the machine. Other boxes are built so that the dog simply has to jump at it and the ball is released. The idea is that a dog will run over 4 hurdles, jump at the mechanism by pouncing on the pedal or front of the box, and then catch the ball as the machine ejects it. Your dog will then cross the hurdles again and bring the ball to you to complete a full round.
Step
2
Making things interesting
Flyball is made much more challenging if you place these hurdles in between your dog's starting point and the flyball box raising the height once your pup has the game rules down pat. Your Shiba Corgi will potentially have to complete a mini agility training course, forward and backward, while also attempting to hold on to the flyball while they're running at full tilt. Flyball can also be played with teams of dogs, with each canine running the course after the other completes it like a relay race.
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More Fun Ideas...

Hula Hoop

This activity is more of a reward than a workout, as your Shiba Corgi will effectively treat a hula hoop like a giant dog toy. The next time you feel that your dog deserves a reward for being such a good boy or girl, consider getting them a hula hoop so that they can spend plenty of time playing with this unconventional toy.

Active Fetch

This alternative version of fetch is great for pet parents who are looking to stay just as active as their pets are. In this version of the classic game, you'll be doing push ups, sit ups, and other types of low impact activities while you wait for your dog to bring back an item you've just tossed.

Conclusion

The activities listed above are just a few of things you and your Shiba Corgi can do together. Every dog is different, even in terms of members of the same breed, meaning that you'll eventually figure out that your dog is into all sorts of activities that we didn't cover on this list. Once you find out which activities your dog really likes to sink their teeth into, look for ways to get creative and put new spins on those activities so that your pup doesn't fall into one particular routine for too long. Shiba Corgis like being surprised, so continue to think of safe ways to add some variety to their lives.