Activities For Tyrolean Hounds

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Introduction

Hardy, independent, and faithful, the Tyrolean Hound - also known as the Tyrolean Bracke - is a scent hound that hails from Austria. This breed of dog actually has close ties with ancient Celtic royalty; back in the 1800's a Celtic ruler by the name of Emperor Maximilian I sought a special kind of dog that could aid him during hunts. The Tyrolean Hound was bred to fulfill the monarch's prayers, helping him hunt rabbits and other animals even through severe snow storms! It wouldn't be until 1908 that the Tyrolean Hound was recognized as their own breed and longer still - in 2006 - before the United Kennel Club recognized the dog in their ranks.

Tall Grass Tumble

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Free
Easy
15 - 30 min
Items needed
Dog Leash
waste bags
Water
Activity description
This activity is 100% free, essentially requires no effort on your part, and can be implemented at the end of other activities like hikes or walks. Though "Tall Grass Tumble" may sound like a fairly intricate activity, the phrase really just refers to the act of taking your dog to a tall grass field before you let them go wild! There are tons of videos all around the internet which feature dogs - or even groups of dogs - hopping in and out of tall grass fields for minutes on end. Tyrolean Hounds will definitely appreciate this opportunity to jump and bound to their heart's content, while you'll appreciate the peace of mind it will net you once your dog is too tired to bark late at night.
Step
1
An add-on activity
As we mentioned before, you can take your dog tall grass tumbling at the end of other specific activities as a means of helping them really shake out the wiggles before heading home. This activity can be especially helpful if you add it to the end of a particularly short hike or walk - the kind where you may have tired yourself out long before your Tyrolean Hound even breaks a sweat (dogs can't sweat the same way we do but you know what we mean)!
Step
2
Vigilance
Simply put, keep an eye on your dog while they play in the grass. It might be tempting to get on your phone or let your eyes wander while your Tyrolean Hound bounds through the grass - it's even okay to do so from time to time - but just make sure not to lose track of your dog. As it's really the only task you have to do during this activity, it's key not to get too distracted while your dog is at play.
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3
Quick check
Once home, give your Tyrolean Hound a quick once-over to check for ticks or bugs that may have made their way into the fur. Additionally, inspect your hound's long ears to make sure they are free of dirt and debris after the fun grass tumbling session. Make it a habit and your pet will sit quietly every time you come in from play.
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Scent Hound Food Hunt

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Any Day
Cheap
Normal
30 - 45 min
Items needed
Aromatic Dog Food
Cardboard Boxes
Activity description
A food hunt is a lot like hide and seek, only your Tyrolean Hound will be looking for their next meal as opposed to a person or a toy. This indoor activity is meant to help curb your Ty's natural urge to hunt after prey without actually having to inflict harm on another living creature. There are actually many versions of this find the food game, but this particular version is catered to scent hounds. Using cardboard boxes with small ventilation holes in them, place food inside keeping the location of it from your hound to encourage them to find the food via their innately powerful sense of smell. This food hunt is a fun way to feed your dog on a rainy day as it will pass time while providing an inexpensive form of mental stimulation.
Step
1
Getting ready
If you don't already have a few cardboard boxes and aromatic dog food on hand, you'll first need to head to the store and get those items. You'll then need to get both items ready for play; for the cardboard boxes, just poke a few holes in them so that the smell of the dog food can waft through. For the dog food, use your pup's favorite meal or make a mixture of new food and familiar food to pique their curiosity. As well, you can put a different kind of food into a few boxes.
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2
Set the stage
An ideal play area is one that's filled with numerous punctured boxes scattered about and separated from one another by a few feet. You are going to place the food inside each box before closing them back up. It helps to separate the boxes so that your Tyrolean Hound can distinguish each food item from one another. By the time you finish setting the stage, you'll likely be able to smell the food wafting out of the boxes yourself.
Step
3
Guidance
All you really have to do during the game is guide your dog around and wait for them to pick up on the scent of the food. Once they do, they'll start wandering closer and closer to one of the boxes with food inside of it. Once your Tyrolean Hound is practically hovering over the box, that'll be your cue to step in, open the box up, and let your pup dig in!
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Agility Training

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Sunny Day
Expensive
Hard
30 - 60 min
Items needed
Tunnel
Balance Beams
Hurdles
Hoops
Water and snacks
Activity description
Agility training is the sort of activity that will really push a dog to their physical limits and beyond. Dogs are encouraged to engage in a number of physically strenuous activities such as jumping through hoops, navigating through tunnels, and balancing their bodies as they traverse various surfaces. Agility training to dogs is like their equivalent of a gymnast training for the Olympic Games. As tough as this activity can be, we can't think of a better way to hone your Tyrolean Hound's innate physical abilities. A dog that regularly engages in training activities is also one that's much less likely to be anxious or restless at home. Consider your budget and make a DIY course that can be enjoyed in just about any weather!
Step
1
Hoops and hurdles
Hoops and hurdles test a dog's reaction time and jumping ability. Starting off, an inexperienced dog will likely miss the mark a few times and fall flat on their face in the worst case scenarios. It's alright though, as dogs like Tyrolean Hounds are very rough and tumble. Failure also provides dogs with all the information they'll need to make adjustments and succeed after subsequent tries. The most you need to do is encourage your dog to jump through hoops and over hurdles, win or lose.
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2
Down the rabbit hole
Tunnels evoke that sensation for dogs, subtly guiding them forward through maze-like structures. The longer the tunnel, the more a dog will have to run and the more likely they may become confused. That much is fine as well, however, as your dog will eventually get the hang of this activity after repeated tries. Once they've got the concept of running through the tunnel down pat, the focus will shift to testing them and seeing how quickly they can do it. Start with a short tunnel and stand at the end with a treat. Gradually you can increase the length and complexity of the tunnel maze.
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3
Balancing act
Dogs can learn to refine their sense of balance and coordination by repeatedly working with pieces of equipment that are essentially long boards of narrow wood. They look a lot like pieces of scaffolding and serve a similar purpose - acting as an elevated surface that a dog will need to carefully navigate across. These dog walking boards are only a few feet off of the ground though, so falling off won't injure your Tyrolean Hound.
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More Fun Ideas...

Blanket Tunnels

Using a few blankets and chairs that are lying around your home, you can create makeshift blanket tunnels for your Tyrolean Hound to traverse through. These are the same sort of structures that young children make during their pre-k years. Dogs will enjoy them just as much as a human child would and may even develop a particular fondness for this game.

Item Retrieval

Like most scent hounds, Tyrolean Hounds love retrieving things and bringing them back to their pack. We've all heard stories about dogs bringing back captured birds or vermin as pets. Well, they do that out of love and misunderstanding between species. Teach your dog to retrieve things like newspapers, car keys, and slippers to reduce the chances of them bringing back an unwanted "gift."

Conclusion

Tyrolean Hounds are hunting dogs through and through. If you're interested in adopting one of these dogs but you don't personally practice hunting, then you'll still need to find ways to give your companion adequate amounts of exercise throughout the day. This isn't the sort of pet that can be left alone in one's backyard to sit around and do nothing all day - they'll become very irritable and may take up nuisance barking if they aren't properly nourished physically and mentally. We think that's a good way to look at things; eating an adequate amount of food and getting an adequate amount of exercise is necessary to keep this breed nourished and healthy. Refer to this guide whenever you feel like mixing things up beyond a casual walk around the block but even if you don't, please strive to give this breed the daily exercise they need.