Crested Cavalier

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9-15 lbs
United States, United Kingdom
Chinese Crested
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
Crested King Charles

The Crested Cavalier is an adorable mix between a Chinese Crested and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. These active and outgoing companion dogs love to play and snuggle with their owners. As such, they require both consistent daily exercise and a lot of human affection. Crested Cavaliers have an average life span of 11 to 15 years, weight of 9 to 15 pounds, and height of 11 to 13 inches. They have a slender, graceful build and long, silky coat that comes in many color variations and require regular brushing. This breed is not yet stable so it can vary widely in appearance and temperament. 

Date of Origin
Chinese Crested, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Crested Cavalier Health

Average Size
Male Crested Cavalier size stats
Height: 11-13 inches Weight: 9-15 lbs
Female Crested Cavalier size stats
Height: 11-13 inches Weight: 9-15 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Lens Luxation
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
Minor Concerns
  • Entropion
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Mitral Valve Disease
Occasional Tests
  • Ophthalmic Exam
  • Chest X-rays
  • Orthopedic Exam
  • Electrocardiograph (ECG - measures rate and rhythm)
  • Holter monitoring (24-hour ECG)
  • Echocardiography (ultrasound)
  • Blood Pressure Evaluation

Crested Cavalier Breed History

The Crested Cavalier comes from two very different parents breeds - the Chinese Crested and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel - that originated worlds apart. The Chinese Crested has somewhat mysterious origins; most cynologists believe that the breed descended from either Mexican hairless dogs (today known as Xoloitzcuintli) or African hairless dogs (today known as the Abyssinian Sand Terrier) and were picked up by shipping merchants in South America or Africa as seafaring pets. By the 13th century, the Chinese Crested appeared in port cities across the world. It was particularly favored in China for its ability to hunt small vermin, earning the prefix to its name. Nevertheless, the Chinese Crested was propagated throughout Europe and North America thereafter. In the 1950s, American celebrity and Chinese Crested advocate, Gypsy Rose Lee, led an effort to popularize the breed in the United States. Though the American Kennel Club registered the breed in 1991, it has never achieved the widespread popularity that many toy breeds enjoy in the country today. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, on the other hand, is a popular breed in Europe and the United States. It is a product of Spaniel and Asian toy hybrids that were bred over the course of several centuries starting in the 1500s. By the 17th century, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels were one of the most favored breeds in England and earned their modern name from their biggest fan of the time, King Charles II. There were no strict breeding guidelines in place for Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and the purebred variety weakened during the 18th and 19th centuries. In the 1920s, however, American financier Roswell Eldridge, traveled to England to buy two Spaniels. Eldridge offered generous prizes to breeders for the best “old type” male and female dogs, similar to the ones depicted alongside King Charles II in artwork and literary accounts. In doing so, Eldridge restored breed stability and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was officially recognized by the AKC in 1996. Given the parent breeds’ long history, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Chinese Crested may have been bred in Europe and United States for over a century. Nonetheless, their hybrid, the Crested Cavalier is not recognized by the AKC.

Crested Cavalier Breed Appearance

The Crested Cavalier has a slender and well-balanced build. It has a graceful gait permissible by its long legs and hare-like feet. This breed has a relatively flat forehead with high set ears, almond eyes, and dark, pointed noses. Crested Cavaliers are considered a toy breed with an average weight of 9 to 15 pounds and height of 11 to 13 inches tall. Its coat is medium length, wavy, and silky with feathering on the ears, chest, legs and tail. Dogs that take after the Chinese Crested may have very short or hairless areas around the torso and belly area. The coat can be multicolor combinations of apricot, black, white, tan, blue, chocolate, cream, palomino, slate, with white or tan spots or markings.

Eye Color Possibilities
brown Crested Cavalier eyes
Nose Color Possibilities
black Crested Cavalier nose
Coat Color Possibilities
black Crested Cavalier coat
white Crested Cavalier coat
blue Crested Cavalier coat
cream Crested Cavalier coat
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Crested Cavalier wavy coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Crested Cavalier Breed Maintenance

Crested Cavaliers are not completely hypoallergenic, but produce less allergens due to their hair-like coat from their Chinese Crested side. They are minimal shedders, but may need to be brushed regularly if they have a longer coat. When grooming, owners should clip around the ears, face, and feet to avoid infection or hindrance to the dog’s mobility. Some owners opt for professional grooming if their pet’s coat is particularly long. Crested Cavaliers should also be bathed monthly, and – like all dog breeds – have their teeth brushed daily and nails clipped once to twice a month. Though uncommon, owners should take every precaution to protect hairless areas of their dog as the skin can be sensitive.

Brushes for Crested Cavalier
Pin Brush
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Crested Cavalier requires daily brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Crested Cavalier Temperament

The Crested Cavalier is an active, graceful, and friendly family pet. Though it is fearless like its Spaniel parent, it is also gentle and affectionate towards adults, children, and other animals alike. Human companionship for this breed is a must; it thrives in a household where it is around people most of the time who are willing to engage in play and snuggling at a moment’s notice! It is also a sensitive animal that does better in structured and stable environments. Crested Cavaliers are relatively easy to train and their small size makes them convenient for urban or apartment living. However, note that this breed still needs a considerable amount of exercise for its small size. Crested Cavaliers do not have strong tendencies to hunt or wander, so you can count on your Crested Cavalier to stay by your side at all times. In fact, these dogs may be happiest when they simply relaxing indoors with their owners.

Crested Cavalier Activity Requirements

The Crested Cavalier is an active breed that requires daily exercise and lots of attention to stay happy and healthy. Crested Cavaliers love daily walks and trips to the dog park, as well as ad hoc play sessions with their owners. Despite their energetic personalities, Crested Cavaliers are equally happy vegging out on the couch with their owners. As such, it is important to incorporate an equal balance of play and rest in your Crested Cavalier’s schedule. Note that this breed is well suited for all types of climates; however, owners should ensure that their pet is not exposed to significant amounts of sun if it has hairless areas on its body.

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
8 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
45 minutes

Crested Cavalier Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$0.8 - $1
Monthly Cost
$20 - $30

Crested Cavalier Owner Experiences

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