What is Bacteria in the Blood?

Animal bites are often infected by Pasteurella multocida, a bacteria that, if not treated and killed, spreads throughout your chinchilla’s body. Other dangerous bacteria that can kill your chin include Klebsiella, E. coli and Streptococcus, as well as others. As they overwhelm the liver’s ability to filter them out of your pet’s bloodstream, its cells can no longer use oxygen, which will lead to death.

When bacterial toxins affect the blood of your chinchilla, the condition is called “septicemia,” and is very dangerous. If your chinchilla suffers from gastroenteritis or sustains a physical injury, it may become easier for bacteria to enter its bloodstream, usually after the condition has gone untreated.

If septicemia is allowed to progress to the organs, the chance your pet could die sharply increases. It’s not easy to spot an injury on your chinchilla because of its dense fur, but it’s vital that you regularly look for any signs of trauma.

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Symptoms of Bacteria in the Blood in Chinchillas

Depending on your chinchilla’s illness, its symptoms may vary:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Depression
  • Weight loss
  • Fur becomes rough

While it may seem odd that gastroenteritis can cause septicemia, when the origins of the stomach illness are bacterial, your chin is at much higher risk of having the bacteria enter its bloodstream, especially if the initial illness hasn’t been treated or treatment was late. Many times, septicemia in a chin does result from a case of gastroenteritis.

When your chin develops septicemia, its symptoms progress fast, sometimes causing your pet to die before you even know it’s sick. Make note of its behaviors and changes in its eating and bowel habits. If you notice a change and get your pet to the vet right away, it has a better chance of survival.

Causes of Bacteria in the Blood in Chinchillas

Septicemia can develop from or be influenced by one of several conditions:

  • Gastroenteritis
  • Skin injury
  • Unsanitary and dirty cage
  • Respiratory diseases
  • Poor ventilation around and in cage
  • High humidity in environment
  • Overgrown teeth
  • Pneumonia

Diagnosis of Bacteria in the Blood in Chinchillas

Take your chinchilla to your vet so it can be diagnosed correctly. The vet will give your chin a full physical and run blood tests, which help him to determine the exact bacteria making your pet sick.

Your vet will also observe your other chin’s symptoms, such as lethargy and lack of appetite. All of these lead him to a diagnosis of bacteria in the blood, but can also help identify underlying conditions.

If your chin has gastroenteritis, explain this to your vet. He’ll treat these symptoms and narrow down which bacteria is causing your pet’s stomach issues, as well as septicemia, if this has already developed. 

Treatment of Bacteria in the Blood in Chinchillas

Take your chinchilla to your vet so it can be diagnosed correctly. The vet will give your chin a full physical and run blood tests, which help him to determine the exact bacteria making your pet sick.

Your vet will also observe your other chin’s symptoms, such as lethargy and lack of appetite. All of these lead him to a diagnosis of bacteria in the blood, but can also help identify underlying conditions.

If your chin has gastroenteritis, explain this to your vet. He’ll treat these symptoms and narrow down which bacteria is causing your pet’s stomach issues, as well as septicemia, if this has already developed. 

Recovery of Bacteria in the Blood in Chinchillas

Once your vet has made a diagnosis, he’ll begin to treat your chin. An appropriate antibiotic helps your pet to recover and return to full health. Your vet will decide whether to administer oral or injected antibiotics.

If your chinchilla has a physical injury, your vet will treat that and apply antibiotic ointment to kill any bacteria causing an infection.

If your pet has begun to go into shock, your vet will treat this along with other symptoms. Fluid replacement can help your chinchilla come out of shock and begin recovering. 

While your pet is being treated, it will receive soft, easily digestible foods, such as pureed butternut or baby porridge. Whole wheat contains vitamin B12, which helps support the central nervous system of your chin. Each of these treatments focus on different areas of your pet’s body and organs, helping it to return to good health.

Cost of Bacteria in the Blood in Chinchillas

While septicemia can be serious, if your chinchilla receives veterinary treatment immediately, it can fully recover. Your aim should be to be observant of your chin’s health and behaviors, thus helping you to detect abnormal signs of illness as early as possible.

Once your vet has treated your chin’s septicemia (bacteria in the blood), it will be healthy enough to return home. Before bringing your pet home, clean its cage out completely, sanitizing all areas of this living space. Replace old food with clean food and provide fresh, clean water. 

Chinchillas like to take “dust baths.” If your pet’s infection is the result of physical injury, it will have to wait for a dust bath until wounds have fully healed to prevent re-infection. (Dust baths are vital for the good hygiene of your chinchilla.) Ask your vet about the best dust material and environment to provide for this activity and so your chin can regularly groom and clean itself.