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What are Gas?

Excessive flatulence in dogs can be a sign that something is wrong with the animal’s digestive system or diet. Dogs generate and pass gas just as humans do, but when observed along with other symptoms may be a cause for concern. Excessive flatulence is more common in overweight and sedentary dogs, but may affect any breed of any age. Don’t hesitate to make an appointment with a veterinarian if your dog is experiencing this condition.

Flatulence is the production of gas through the process of digestion. It is a normal part of the digestive process, but can sometimes be of concern if occurring suddenly or excessively in otherwise healthy dogs.

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Average Cost

$400

Symptoms of Gas in Dogs

  • Expulsion of gas from the mouth or anus
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Swelling of the stomach and intestines from gas buildup
  • Audible rumbles from the digestive system.
  • Unusually offensive odor
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Causes of Gas in Dogs

  • Indigestion
  • Eating too soon after vigorous exercise
  • Eating too quickly such that air is ingested
  • Sudden change in diet
  • Spicy food
  • Eating milk products
  • Diets with excessive soybeans, peas or beans
  • Diets with excessive fiber
  • Ingestion of spoiled food
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
  • Parasitic infection
  • Intestinal tumors
  • Gastroenteritis
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Diagnosis of Gas in Dogs

Diet

While some amount of flatulence is normal, excessive or sudden onset may indicate a problem. Symbiotic bacteria in the intestines help digest fiber and other components the dog is not able to fully digest itself. In the process of digestion, these bacteria produce gasses. If the dog is unable to digest enough of these foods before they reach the intestine, excessive gas may be produced. The veterinarian will want a detailed account of the kind of food your pet is eating, the frequency and type of any treats, and whether it has been allowed to roam unsupervised (during which time it may have eaten something without your knowledge). Be sure to mention if your dog eats extremely quickly or “wolfs” its food. If no other symptoms are present, such as vomiting or diarrhea, the veterinarian will suspect a dietary cause.

Gastrointestinal Dysfunction

Another cause of flatulence in dogs is the incomplete absorption of nutrients, again leading to excessive fermentation by bacteria, producing gas. There are many causes of poor absorption of nutrients. Inflammatory Bowel Disease can flatten special protrusions called villi in the small intestine. These structures aid in absorption, and damage to them can produce diarrhea, weight loss and flatulence. Parasitic infection can also irritate the gut, slowing nutrient absorption with similar symptoms. The veterinarian will take flatulence into account along with the other symptoms, and order lab tests to find the problem.

Common lab tests for these symptoms may include examination of a stool sample, culturing the bacteria of the gut, some blood and urine tests, and imaging such as x-rays or ultrasound. These tests will help separate out what is causing your pet’s discomfort.

Occasionally, acute (temporary) gastroenteritis may occur after eating spoiled food or taking ill from a virus. This is usually temporary and resolves itself after a few days. Tell your veterinarian if your dog has recently been ill.

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Treatment of Gas in Dogs

Diet

Diet modification should start with the reduction of peas, soybeans (if any), fiber, and fat. Too little fiber can cause problems as well, so make these changes incrementally and observe your pet carefully. Don’t feed your pet spicy or acidic foods, reduce the number of commercial treats given, and don’t feed immediately after a run. Dogs are lactose intolerant, so avoid giving cheese or milk-based products.

Gastrointestinal

Treatment for gastrointestinal dysfunction will vary according to the type and specific presentation of the illness as determined by the veterinarian. Acute gastroenteritis usually resolves itself, while parasite infections will require medication and decontamination of the animal’s living space. Inflammatory bowel disease has some treatments available, but is not well understood, and is often resistant to the available treatments.

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Recovery of Gas in Dogs

Managing your pet’s diet and eating habits can help curb flatulence and digestive upset. Careful observation and modification of when and how you feed your pet is often successful at reducing flatulence. Keep an eye out for any secretive snacks your pet may be taking during walks or play in common areas.

In the case of parasites, make sure to diligently give the medication as directed and keep your pet away from sources of re-contamination. Give your dog a clean and dry living space, and avoid contact with poorly cared for or wild animals, their feces, and their living spaces.

IBD can be managed in many cases with anti-emetic and anti-inflammatory medication. Follow your veterinarian’s advice and monitor your dog closely. Flatulence is the least distressing symptom of IBD, so even if it cannot be successfully controlled, it does not pose a serious threat to your dog’s health.

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Gas Average Cost

From 12 quotes ranging from $300 - $1,500

Average Cost

$400

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Gas Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

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Pit Bull-Female

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4 months 2 weeks

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Unknown severity

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1 found helpful

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Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Laying On Bed Whining, Little Gas W/Stinky Odor, Not Sleeping

She has never done this before. She is playing a little bit with our male and then will lay back down, whining. Im not sure how to sooth her. She wont sleep.

Aug. 5, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. If she is uncomfortable because of a GI upset, that may pass. It would be best to keep a close eye on her,e and if she develops diarrhea, or vomiting, or continues to be uncomfortable, then having her seen by a veterinarian would be a good idea. They would be able to examine her and see what might be causing the problem. I hope that she is okay.

Aug. 5, 2020

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Brittany (Spaniel)

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Twenty Months

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Unknown severity

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0 found helpful

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Unknown severity

Has Symptoms

Fast Heavy Breathing, Whining, Having Trouble Getting Comfortable And Pacing, Passing Loud Gas,

my dog all of a sudden is having trouble getting comfortable or laying down. He's breathing very fast and heavy. Passing some loud gas. He's also whining quite a bit 😥

July 19, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Gina U. DVM

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0 Recommendations

Hello, I'm so sorry to see that your pup is not feeling well. He may have eaten something that disagreed with his stomach, and now he experiencing painful flatulence. Or he could be having stomach cramps and may have some diarrhea soon. I recommend continuing to monitor him, and if he still seems uncomfortable in the morning to take him to see a veterinarian. Hope he feels better soon.

July 19, 2020

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Hazel

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Ridgeback mixed

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14 Years

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Serious severity

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0 found helpful

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Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Gi And Lots Of Gas
Diagnosed With Gi And Lots Of Gas

My 14 yo dog was diagnosed with GI. She just started treatment today. However, she is still releasing strong smelling gas. We can even hear oit whenever she releases. Is there anything i can give her for the gas? She is already taking probiotics and antibiotics , plus a prescription only food. I want to find out if we can do anything for her gas.

Aug. 19, 2018

Hazel's Owner

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0 Recommendations

The gas will resolve along with the other symptoms, but today is just the first day of treatment and it may take a few days to over a week to see improvement depending on severity and treatment prescribed. We generally don’t treat gas as it is more important to treat the underlying condition rather than the symptoms. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Aug. 19, 2018

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Sophie

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Bassett Hound

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4 Years

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Moderate severity

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1 found helpful

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Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

No Other Symtoms

My Bassett Hound is Epileptic. he is not on medication because her seizures are few and short and only during storms, she hasn't had one in a long time, and I don't want her to depend on medicines. When I rescued her, four years ago, she had been without food for weeks, had been abandoned in a severe storm. We had her spayed as soon as she was well fed and strong enough, she was very skinny and weak when we found her. The vet found that she had Pyometra, He said that that had been taken care of. She has been happy and well cared for ever since. She was fine until a few weeks ago when she started passing noisy, very foul smelling gas. She's not bloated at all. What can I do for her? We love her very much and are worried that it has do do with the Pyometra.

July 14, 2018

Sophie's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1 Recommendations

If Sophie is spayed, she would not likely have pyometra, as the majority of her uterus is gone. Gas can be due to a change in diet, something that she ate, or parasites. If the gassiness continues, it would be a good idea to have her examined by your veterinarian to try and determine the cause, but if she is not showing any other signs, she may be okay.

July 14, 2018

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Hachi

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Bluetick Rat Terrier

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7 Years

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Serious severity

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Serious severity

Has Symptoms

Lethargic, Posturing, No Gas ,No De

Our dog stopped eating is visible in pain, posturing, has vomited bile, vet put him on probiotics and special food but he won’t eat. Usually he eats faster than you can put the bowl down.

May 16, 2018

Hachi's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

I'm not sure what testing was done or medications Hachi is on, but is seems that he may need further diagnostics to figure out what is going on with him. He may need lab work or x-rays to find out what is wrong with him. That is definitely not normal behavior, and it would be best to have him seen as soon as possible to try and figure out what is happening with him. I hope that he is okay.

May 16, 2018

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Maggie

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Puggle

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9 Years

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Moderate severity

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0 found helpful

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Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Stomach Pain And Hardness

Yesterday my puggle, maggie ate my mother in laws chihuahua food and then about 5am the next morning is bloated and in pain in her stomach and rib areas. She’s had a little diarrhea but it seems like she might have gas and can’t get rid of it. Do you think that sounds like gas or something more serious? If it is gas how can I help her get rid of it? Thank you Jodi

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Sully

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Goldendoodle

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1 Year

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Fair severity

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Fair severity

Has Symptoms

Not Eating
Not Eating.
Not Eating. Stomach Gurgles. Gas.

Sully is a just turned 1 year old mini Goldendoodle. Recently, about 3 days ago, switched his dry food from Taste of Wild to Instinct Ultmate, mixing half and half right now. Also mixing in a small amount of canned Purina pro plan, which he loves. Yesterday didn’t eat much, and today nothing. Stomach gurgles, and a bit of passing gas. Should I be worried?

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Average Cost

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