Hair Follicle Tumors in Dogs

Hair Follicle Tumors in Dogs - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

Most common symptoms

Bleeding

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Rated as moderate conditon

9 Veterinary Answers

Most common symptoms

Bleeding

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Hair Follicle Tumors in Dogs - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

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What are Hair Follicle Tumors?

Hair follicle tumors develop as a result of the disordered growth of the hair follicles. There is a genetic predisposition to developing hair follicle tumors, and they are more likely to occur in the Golden Retriever, Standard Poodle, Miniature Schnauzer, English Springer Spaniel, Irish Setter, German Shepherd, Cocker Spaniel, Norweigan Elkhound, Keeshond, Kerry Blue, Bedlington Terrier, Bichon Frise, and Basset Hound breeds.

Hair follicle tumors are tumors originating in the hair follicles in a dog’s skin. While there are several types, almost all are generally benign, and the prognosis for hair follicle tumors is typically good.

Symptoms of Hair Follicle Tumors in Dogs

The primary symptom of hair follicle tumors is the palpable tumor on the surface of a dog’s skin. Tumors may ulcerate and ooze bloody fluid and are at a risk of becoming infected.

Types

Infundibular Keratinizing Acanthoma

tumor develops in the upper part of the hair follicle and may be solitary or multiple. These are likely found on the back of the neck and trunk. They discharge keratin and pus and/or blood. These more commonly occur in males than females, and the average age of occurrence is five years.

Trichoepithelioma

tumor is typically found in middle age dogs, on the back, shoulders, trunk, tail and limbs. They ulcerate and can discharge pus and/or blood. In German Shepherds, they are likely to occur in multiple sites, although they can occur singularly.

Trichoblastoma

tumors develop in hair matrical cells (cells at the root of the hair follicle), are usually solitary, and are likely found at the head, neck and base of the ear. They are most likely to occur in the Standard Poodle and Cocker Spaniel breeds.

Pilomatricoma

tumors develop in hair matrical cells and are usually solitary. However, there is an extremely rare malignant form of pilomatricoma that can metastasize and spread throughout the body. However, only five cases of multiple malignant pilomatricoma have ever been recorded in the United States. Certain breeds with continuous hair growth are most susceptible to developing this type of tumor because of the constant cell division occurring in their hair follicles. These are the Kerry Blue, Poodle, Bedlington Terrier, Schnauzer, and Bichon Frise breeds.

Causes of Hair Follicle Tumors in Dogs

The cause of hair follicle tumors is unknown, although there seems to be a genetic connection, as the correlation of certain physical structures of follicles of certain breeds, that may contribute to their development. Development of hair follicle tumors is also associated with excess production of the naturally occurring chemical B-catenin, which enables hair follicles to develop from skin cells.

Diagnosis of Hair Follicle Tumors in Dogs

Diagnosis depends upon a thorough reporting of the onset of your dog’s health history and the onset of symptoms, as well as a complete physical examination. This will include a chemical blood profile, a complete blood count, and a urinalysis that will include an electrolyte panel. These tests will determine the overall health of your dog and reveal any other issues.

The veterinarian will be able to detect a hair follicle tumor upon physical examination, and will then take samples of the tumor through biopsy and fine needle aspirate to submit to a veterinary pathologist for histopathologic laboratory analysis. The veterinary pathologist will report out the results, of which the analysis will help provide transparency to the type of hair follicle tumor and if it is benign or malignant.

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Treatment of Hair Follicle Tumors in Dogs

Treatment is surgical removal of the tumor itself, and this is a simple procedure for singular, benign hair follicle tumors.

Multiple infundibular keratinizing acanthomas will each be removed surgically, and your dog’s coat may need to be shaved completely. This will be followed by antibiotics and high doses of omega-3-fatty acids.

Trichoepithelioma may be found to be malignant; however, this type of cancer does not metastasize and is usually cured by removal of the tumor or tumors themselves.

In the unlikely event your dog is diagnosed malignant pilomatricoma, you will be referred to a veterinarian oncologist to discuss treatment. Prognosis for this incredibly rare form of cancer is poor.

Recovery of Hair Follicle Tumors in Dogs

Recovery involves the proper care of the surgical site and your dog’s skin. The area must be kept clean and monitored for healing. You cannot allow your pet to rub, scratch, lick or bite the affected area; an Elizabethan, which is provided to prevent your dog from licking or biting due to irritation, may be necessary. Report any negative changes to the site to the veterinarian immediately.

Most tumors are completely cured by surgical excision. Prognosis of benign hair follicle tumors is typically great; however, your veterinary pathologist will be able to give you an accurate prognosis based on your dog’s tumor that will include the probability of local recurrence. It is important to monitor your dog’s coat throughout its life in order to identify the recurrence of any hair follicle tumors and contact the veterinarian immediately if you identify one.

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Hair Follicle Tumors Average Cost

From 5 quotes ranging from $600 - $10,000

Average Cost

$8,000

Hair Follicle Tumors Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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cronus

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Chow Chow

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6 Months

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Moderate condition

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0 found helpful

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Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

The Incision Ruptured

my 6 mos old male chow has a follicle infection so i went to the vet and had him checked, at first our vet prescribed 1 week of clavamox antibiotic but it was not cured. after 2 - 3 weeks pus are still secreting from his follicle so the vet advised for an operation. she took some parts of the skin which she said there was a lump. the she sutured. after 3 weeks post op the suture ruptured and to my suprise there is a lot of hair inside that is growing.

May 1, 2018

cronus' Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1611 Recommendations

Without being able to see Cronus, I'm not sure what might be happening with him, but he is quite young to be having these problems. Chows are prone to certain skin conditions that can respond well to specific prescription shampoo therapy, but if the suture site has ruptured, it would be a good idea to have a recheck with your veterinarian and find out what possible causes and treatments there might be. I hope that all goes well for him.

May 1, 2018

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G

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Poodle

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9years

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Mild condition

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0 found helpful

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Mild condition

Has Symptoms

None

my senior standard was diagnosed with malignant trichoepithiliomas. it was graded to be on average to higher end of cell growth according to my vet. is chemotherapy needed or should we watch for more growths and do an xray from time to time? also, is raw feeding recommended for such things or is dehydrated low carb also a good choice? I was also going to supplement with curcumin and mushrooms??? thank you :)

March 25, 2018

G's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1611 Recommendations

Without examining G, or knowing the extent of her disease, it is difficult for me to comment on what treatment might be necessary. A referral to an oncologist would be a good idea, as they will be able to see her, know her situation, and determine what chemotherapy options may be available, as well as any possible dietary changes that may help her. I hope that everything goes well for her.

March 25, 2018

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Casey

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Jack Russell Terrier

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11 Years

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Serious condition

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1 found helpful

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Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Itching

My doggie is an 11 year old Jack Russell Terrier. He has so many of these tumors on his body and they bleed, ooze off and on. Some look lumpy like a wart and others with an open ulcer type center. He has too many to count but for a 15 lb dog he has one every 3 inches all over his body. Are there any home remedies to ease or shrink these? His neck is the worst with a cluster of about 5.

Feb. 27, 2018

Casey's Owner

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3320 Recommendations

There are different types of hair follicle tumours, each with a different etiology and treatment; some require surgical excision whilst other may require chemotherapy etc… You should really discuss with your Veterinarian the type of tumour present (if already diagnosed as hair follicle tumour) and look into specific management options (if available) for that specific type of tumour. The link below goes over different types of hair follicle tumours. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.msdvetmanual.com/integumentary-system/tumors-of-the-skin-and-soft-tissues/epidermal-and-hair-follicle-tumors#v3281038

Feb. 27, 2018

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Dru

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Basset Hound

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5 Years

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Serious condition

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1 found helpful

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Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Cancerous Tumor

Hello, My five year old basset hound had a lump on his back. His previous owners said they had it checked out and that it was nothing to worry about. I have had him for two years and within the last few months, the lump grew quite substantially. I took him to the vet and they removed the lump and had it sent off for testing. I got the call today that it is in fact cancer. Pilomatricoma, a RARE type of aggressive cancer. The vet checked with other vets at the clinic and none had ever seen it before. They all had to do some research before calling me about it. He stressed that it is very rare. He said they got clean borders on the tumor and asked if the dog was showing any signs of neurological problems. He isn't. He seems perfectly healthy. The vet said it is possible it could have spread to the bones or the lungs so we are having Xrays done this week. How should this cancer be treated moving forward? If it has spread to the lungs, are there any options? How likely is it that the tumor will come back? My vet didn't seem to know much about it which worries me even more. PLEASE HELP!

Feb. 27, 2018

Dru's Owner


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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1611 Recommendations

Thank you for your email. Without knowing more about Dru, the actual location of the tumor, and the extent of tissue involvement, I am not the right person to answer these questions for you, unfortunately. Your veterinarians are researching the tumor, and will be able to give you better answers, as they have seen the tumor, did the surgery, and know more about any details that might affect the prognosis. i hope that all goes well for her.

Feb. 27, 2018

Have a question have a golden retrevior he has infected hair follical on his head they tried to remove it surgically and now they say it might extend down deeper where it would get closer to his spine have you heard of this

Aug. 22, 2018

Chris L.


How did dru make out? We just found out our Westie has the same type of tumor.

June 28, 2018

Roe M.

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Curlyfry

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Chihuahua

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3 Years

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Mild condition

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0 found helpful

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Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Fatigue

My 3 yr. old chihuahua recently began to get real puffy around her eyes and her hair was raised in several places on her back, neck, and tail. I could tell that she was dehydrated and it was difficult to get her to her dish because her paws were painful to walk on, so I had her drink out of my cupped hand. Well I ran my finger tips down her back and neck and a whole bunch of water pockets burst at the base of her hairs. I realized that her eyes were also swollen with this water at the root of her hair follicle. She would gag a tiny bit when I would gently pop these water filled hair roots and I could only assume she was recieving some of the water in her throat. None the less, she thoroughly enjoyed me running a combing or my finger nails through her hair because it gave her such relief. I took her to a vet and her gave me a pill for stickfleas. ??? I never saw fleas but did look it up on google. The only thing I could think was that they were in her paws. Anyways ibwaould have to pop these water pockets around her eyes and about every 3 hours or so because the inflammation would cause her to weaze. It sounded like The was struggling to get a breath. This lasted about three days and then just disappeared but occasionally I’ll run into a Little water bubble atbher haircroot when i’m petting her. Otherwise she is a very healthy happy dog , I was just searching for an answer to this. Please Thank you Sincerely Tracy A. Figueroa tracyann44@gmail.com

Jan. 25, 2018

Curlyfry's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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1611 Recommendations

Thank you for your email. It sounds like Curlyfry is getting better, and if your veterinarian had a high suspicion for stickfleas, and treated her with an appropriate medication, you should see continued improvement. Those fleas tend to occur with contact with poultry, so if she is around chickens or other birds, she needs to be on flea control for them. If she is not responding to the medication, she may need further treatment, and it would be best to have a follow up exam with your veterinarian to make sure that she gets the treatment that she needs.

Jan. 26, 2018

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Riddick

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Staffordshire Bull Terrier

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7 Years

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Mild condition

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Hard Lump On Back

Hello all, I'm wondering if someone can help. My dog Riddick has developed a egg sized hard lump on his back near his neck, it has come out of nowhere so I don't know if he's banged it when we have taken him to the beach and it's swollen up, or if it's a hair follicle tumour. I have done some research but I need to know.. -what does a hair follicle tumour feel like? -would it come over night? -are they dangerous? He has banged himself before and it's swollen up and we took him to the vets and they gave anti inflammatory tablets and it went in around 4 weeks, but becuase of where it is on him in quite concerned. It is under his skin so there is no open wound and it doesn't seem to be bothering him, he's still playing, eating, going for walks. It has been there around a week now so if it hasn't gone down by next week I will be taking him to the vets. It's jsut strange how it's appeared out of no where. Hope you can help. Thank you

Hair Follicle Tumors Average Cost

From 5 quotes ranging from $600 - $10,000

Average Cost

$8,000

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