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What is Salmonella Infection?

A salmonella infection is caused by the salmonella bacteria, which is typically found in raw meat or eggs but can be transferred from an infected animal’s stool or saliva. If your dog is vomiting or has bloody diarrhea, schedule a visit as soon as possible and let a veterinarian know. Be sure to wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water after handling your dog. A contaminated animal can continue to shed the bacteria for weeks following infection.

Salmonellosis is a zoonotic infection, which means that it can spread between animals and humans. The prognosis for mild cases of salmonella infection is good, though complications may arise due to severe dehydration or sepsis. If your dog has salmonellosis, it is important to ensure that he or she stays hydrated and that you maintain good hygiene to prevent cross contamination.

Salmonella Infection Average Cost

From 32 quotes ranging from $300 - $5,000

Average Cost

$1,800

Symptoms of Salmonella Infection in Dogs

Dogs who have contracted salmonellosis may be an asymptomatic carrier or may exhibit a range of symptoms, depending on the severity of the infection. A dog that has salmonellosis will most likely begin showing symptoms within the first 72 hours of being infected. These signs include:

  • Fever
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy
  • Dehydration
  • Loss of appetite
  • Depression
  • Decreased activity
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Causes of Salmonella Infection in Dogs

Salmonellosis is caused by the salmonella bacteria, which is found in raw or undercooked meat. The organism can be transmitted through contaminated food or through the feces or saliva of an infected animal. Most dogs contract the disease when they consume contaminated food, such as raw eggs, recalled pet food, and unrefrigerated wet food. Infected dogs can shed the bacteria in their feces and saliva for prolonged periods of time after infection.

Dogs with weaker immune systems are more prone to contracting salmonellosis. This includes younger and older animals, as well as those who are taking antibiotics that may imbalance the level of healthy bacteria in their intestinal tracts.

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Diagnosis of Salmonella Infection in Dogs

If your dog is behaving strangely, has a fever, or is vomiting and having consistent diarrhea, visit the veterinarian immediately. Bring a fresh stool sample. Salmonellosis shares symptoms with other conditions, such as gastroenteritis, parasites, or food allergies, and the veterinarian will need to run a series of tests to identify salmonellosis as the cause.

The veterinarian will take a history of your dog and will ask for a list of exhibited symptoms. If your dog has consumed raw meat or eggs or recalled pet food, or if he or she has been in contact with potentially infected birds, let the veterinarian know. The veterinarian will take urine and fecal samples for laboratory testing, which will help rule out other conditions and identify the salmonella bacteria specifically. In severe cases, or in the event of sepsis, blood cultures may be required.

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Treatment of Salmonella Infection in Dogs

Most mild cases of salmonellosis can be treated at home. Treatment for a salmonella infection is primarily supportive, with a focus on ensuring that your dog receives enough fluids during the recovery process. Provide a steady supply of clean, fresh water, and make sure that your dog is staying hydrated to compensate for the fluid lost through vomiting and diarrhea. Depending on the extent of the infection, the veterinarian may prescribe antibiotics to help fight the salmonella bacteria or prevent shock.

In more severe cases of salmonellosis, your dog may need to be hospitalized. Dogs that are severely dehydrated may require IV fluid therapy as part of treatment, and those that have developed a blood infection or sepsis may need a plasma or blood transfusion. In the majority of cases, prognosis is good, and adult animals that are otherwise in good health typically recover fully from the infection. The results may be less favorable for dogs that have developed sepsis.

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Recovery of Salmonella Infection in Dogs

Once your dog is home, make sure that he or she has access to clean water throughout the day. You may need to limit the amount that your dog eats for the first few days after diagnosis, though as your dog grows stronger, you can gradually provide more food until your dog is eating normally again.

Hygiene is a vital part of management for a salmonella infection. In order to prevent cross contamination to you or your family, always wear protective gear such as gloves when picking up your dog’s feces. Wash your hands thoroughly after coming into contact with your dog or handling anything that he or she has touched, and try to avoid being licked. When you are washing your dog’s food and water dishes, try to do so outside of the kitchen or bathroom sink, and use a brush that is set aside for this specific purpose. Your dog can continue to shed salmonella bacteria for weeks after infection.

You may need to bring your dog back to the veterinarian’s office for a follow-up exam. Depending on your dog’s progress, the veterinarian may want to take additional urine or fecal samples to ensure that the infection has been resolved.

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Salmonella Infection Average Cost

From 32 quotes ranging from $300 - $5,000

Average Cost

$1,800

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Salmonella Infection Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Need pet health advice? Ask a vet

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Liza

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Mutt

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3 Months

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Moderate severity

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1 found helpful

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Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea
Vomiting
Loss Of Appetite
Stays Hidden

I don't know what is happening to my dog. We think it may be salmonella but are not sure. About three days ago she would not eat even if we fed her from the palm of our hands. She stays hidden behind our couch unless she needs to vomit or drink water. She will let us touch her but hides afterwards. After she drinks the water she vomits white foam like stuff. A lot. She has diarrhea. We think she may have caught a bird. Could this be salmonella? Please help.

Nov. 27, 2017

Liza's Owner

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1 Recommendations

This may be caused by a variety of different infections and the white foam vomit is normal in a dog which hasn’t eaten for a day or two; many different infections may cause the symptoms you are describing which may include bacteria, virus, parasites (both protozoa and worms) or fungal infections. You should visit your Veterinarian for an examination, especially if you haven’t vaccinated Liza as there are serious infections like Parvo which can be life threatening (90% mortality without treatment). In the meantime, keep Liza hydrated but visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Nov. 27, 2017

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Kody

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Alaskan Malamute

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20 Months

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Moderate severity

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Moderate severity

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We have a 20month old male Alaskan Malamute. About two months ago he got quite sick with diarrhea and a bit of vomiting. He was treated by the vet for an intestinal infection. However, after two month his stools are not solid (not water but like pudding). He also had a Giardia infection which was treated with Flagyl but he did not tolerate the flaglyl well so it was suspended after 4 days. He's a bit lethargic, eats once a day and doesn't really act sick so to speak. What can we do to help him have solid stools again and to get his energy back?

Nov. 18, 2017

Kody's Owner


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If Kody had issues with the Flagyl (metronidazole), you should try treating with fenbendazole (like Panacur) at a dose of 50mg/kg per day (25mg/lb per day) for ten days and is generally considered the treatment of choice over Flagyl; also it is important to keep Kody hydrated and you can try to add some unflavoured Pedialyte to his water. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Nov. 18, 2017

Thank You for your response Dr. Turner . Our dog weighs about 100 lbs. How often the panacur per day and will this cut his appetite or make him a bit sick? thanks again David I.

Nov. 19, 2017

Kody's Owner

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Bryer

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Great Dane

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6 years

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Moderate severity

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My Great Dane, Bryer is 6 years old and in very good health. Well until 2 days ago. She brought to me the head of a salmon I had caught last fall. I dried the head over the summer but made sure I disposed of the carcass. She had found the head and brought it to me. I immediately took it and ND threw it away. It didn't look to be chewed up andndny but yesterday I noticed when I let her out of her pen she stayed very close to me (uncharacteristc) and i noticed her stomach was swollen and hard. By this morning the swelling seemed to have gone down but I can tell she is still in pain. There has been no vommiting or diarrhea. No real appetite either. More than likely I'll take her to the vet tomorrow but would like your opinion as well. Thank you so much for your time!

Oct. 27, 2017

Bryer's Owner

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There is a disease call salmon poisoning which isn’t really poisoning but an infection to which dogs are the only affected species; symptoms usually appear within a week of consumption and can include lethargy, loss of appetite, diarrhoea, vomiting, swollen lymph nodes among others. I would get Bryer to your Veterinarian for a check and some antibiotics and an anthelmintic. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.vetmed.wsu.edu/outreach/Pet-Health-Topics/categories/diseases/salmon-poisoning

Oct. 27, 2017

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Lola and Gus

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Chihuahua

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7 Years

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Mild severity

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Mild severity

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Our 7 year old Chihuahua two days ago threw up once and started having episodes of foul smelling, yellowish-brown diarrhea, no blood present that I can tell. She was somewhat lethargic but would still eat and drink small amounts. The diarrhea has slowed down. A day later our other dog started the same thing. They are inside dogs only. No dietary changes. They shared a chew bone purchased at grocery store which they have occasionally and regularly eat Pedigree dog food. However....we have a few chickens and the dogs love their poop. We discourage this "snacking" but they do ingest some. Could this be the cause? This is not a new behavior and we try to watch and prevent this. Thank you for any suggestions!

Oct. 2, 2017

Lola and Gus' Owner

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It is very possible that the dogs are being affected by something in the chicken droppings; bacteria and parasites are commonly found in chickens droppings especially in a backyard situation; in fact my poultry professor said “if you find nothing in the droppings of birds then there is something more seriously wrong”. I would recommend speaking with your Veterinarian about this, they may prescribe some antibiotics as Salmonella and Campylobacter are commonly found in these situations. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Oct. 2, 2017

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Dory

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Yorkie

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2 Years

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Moderate severity

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My 2yr old yorkshire terrier recently started having foul diarrhea last night. I have been away from home due to illness in the family,and she unfortunately ran out of her science diet hard food. My husband fed her doggie treats one day, then boiled chicken the next 2 days. Yesterday she had Iams small breed hard food. Now the diarrhea. No fever, vomiting, fatigue, nor depression. What to do?

Sept. 23, 2017

Dory's Owner

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The diarrhoea may be just due to sudden changes in diet, if Dory is otherwise fine I would keep an eye on her and ensure that she keeps hydrated. Feeding a diet of boiled chicken and rice again may help calm the gastrointestinal tract and then after a few days if the stool is good, start to transition across back to her regular dog food gradually. If the diarrhoea doesn’t improve, visit your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Sept. 23, 2017

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Salmonella Infection Average Cost

From 32 quotes ranging from $300 - $5,000

Average Cost

$1,800

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