How to Calm a Tibetian Mastiff Before Grooming

Medium
10 - 60 Minutes
1 Week

Introduction

The Tibetan Mastiff was bred primarily as a guard dog and is highly loyal, protective, independent, and yes, stubborn. Keep in mind that these beautiful dogs tend to be quite territorial and require a strong fence to keep them on the right side. One of the best things you can do at the very outset to help keep him calm at all times is to socialize him with lots of other people, dogs, and situations. This will help him to be more accepting of new situations, including grooming.  

Dog's Perspective

Like many other breeds, Tibetan Mastiffs are not fond of new situations and the sight of the various brushes and tools you will use to properly groom him are likely to make him more than just a little nervous. The good news is that while he is young you can train him to remain calm before and during grooming. Along with this, most Mastiffs become extremely calm animals as they mature. 

The Day Time is the Right Time Method

Effective
0 Votes
Slicker Brush
Pin Brush
Deshedder
Dematter
Step
1
Choose the right time
Tibetan Mastiffs are wide awake and on the alert at night, leftovers from when they were responsible for guarding the camps of their owners. During the day they are more relaxed and calm, making this the best time to work on grooming.
Step
2
Go now, take a hike
These massive dogs need plenty of exercise for their health and to help tire them out for grooming. Just because they are more active at night, doesn't mean they aren't active during the day, it simply means they are less active. To help tire your pup more, take him for a nice long hike. Adjust the distance based on how old your dog is, younger pups tire quickly.
Step
3
Create a calm grooming environment
Choose a room or location in your house with a non-carpeted floor (for easy cleanup) and pour a little lavender essential oil into a diffuser. Turn it on and give it a few minutes to spread throughout the room.
Step
4
Turn on the tunes
Choose some nice relaxing Kenny G or maybe a little classical music such as Debussy. Turn it on and let the soft sounds flow through the room. Both the lavender and the music will have a nice calming effect on your pooch.
Step
5
A nice body rub
Okay, so trying to reach down through all that thick fur to his body can be challenging. But, by taking the time to rub his most sensitive areas such as feet, genitals, anus, tail, and head. The more time you spend handling these areas the less it will bother him when you start grooming them. By now your pup should be like putty in your hands, making grooming not only possible, but fun for both of you.
Recommend grooming method?

The Turn Your Pup to Mush Method

Effective
0 Votes
Slicker Brush
Pin Brush
Deshedder
Dematter
Step
1
Hit the trail
Nothing is harder than trying to groom a Tibetan Mastiff who won't stop fussing and wriggling. If you want your pup to be calm and relaxed, start out with a nice long hike. Base the distance on how old your pup is, you can always increase the distance as he gets older and bigger.
Step
2
Upon your return
Once you get back home, let your pup have a drink and then spend some time engaged in gentle play.
Step
3
Hands-on
This chill time should involve you spending a lot of time touching him. The idea is to desensitize him to being handled, especially in those areas he doesn't like being touched such as his genitals and paws.
Step
4
Hit all the right spots
Take your time and give your pooch a good all over body rub. Hit the muscles, joints, and every inch. If you are really good at what you do, you might just put your pup to sleep.
Step
5
Show him the tools you plan to use
Lay out the brushes and tools you plan to use during the grooming on the floor so that your pup can sniff at them, look at them, and yes even lick them if that is what he wants to do. This should be the final stage in training your pup to remain calm for grooming.
Recommend grooming method?

Caution & Considerations

  • Although your pup may seem like he would never bite you, if for any reason you think he might try to nip at you, be safe and put a muzzle on him.
  • Consistency is a vital part of the training process and will help him to learn to be calm far quicker.
  • Although a nice long walk is a good way to tire your pup out, just don't overdo it as this can lead to physical injury.
  • If you come across mats in his fur, use shears to cut them out.
  • Do NOT try to pull the mats out with a brush as this will rip the hair right out of your pup's skin, which is very painful.
  • Yes, you should be using treats along the way to reward your pup for getting things right.
  • Give your Mastiff plenty of time to examine the tools you plan to use. The more time you give him the less he is likely to fuss.
  • You should brush your Mastiff no less than once a week, daily is even better. 

Conclusion

Size can make a big difference when it comes to grooming a dog; the last thing you want is a 180lb Tibetan Mastiff who is too wound up to groom. Use the time spent training your pup to calm down as the perfect time to bond with your pup. Keep him groomed each week. If you let it go too long, his hair may become heavily matted and have to be cut instead of brushed. 

Success Stories and Grooming Questions

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