Prepare for unexpected vet bills

What is Urinating in His Crate?

When a dog is kept in her crate during the day, he may urinate in his space. A dog may urinate in his crate just one time a day, depending on how long he is kept contained. If a dog is kept in his crate all day long or all night, he may urinate several times. 

If a dog is in his crate for a short period of time, he may only urinate one time. This depends on if he has gone outside to the bathroom before he was put in. Also, many dogs feel that their crate is like a “safe haven” and they want to keep it clean; therefore, they may not urinate in their safe place.

If a dog is urinating in his crate, there may be other reasons why. Reasons he may be urinating in his crate include:

  • Improperly trained
  • Prolonged time in crate
  • Anxiety
  • Overactive bladder
  • Urinary tract infection

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Why Urinating in His Crate Occurs in Dogs

When a dog is in his crate for a long period of time, he may need to urinate. Other reasons may include:

Improperly Trained

If your dog is improperly housebroken, he may not understand when to go to the bathroom and when to not go to the bathroom. It takes a lot of dedication, time, and patience to train a dog to go to the bathroom properly. If a dog doesn’t know what is expected, and is kept in a crate for a period of time, he may urinate.

Prolonged Time in Crate

If your dog is left in his crate for a long time, such as more than 5 hours or so, he may pee in it. Every dog is different, and some dogs can go without a toileting break for longer than others. However, if you are working dog parent, it is important to not leave your dog in a crate for the day, every day. Many responsible dog owners make arrangements for their dogs in order for them to have the opportunity to go to the bathroom during the day.

Anxiety

If you have an overly anxious dog, he may pee in his crate or in other places around the house. He may become nervous when you leave him in there, and may urinate due to stress or anxiety of being confined.

Overactive Bladder

Some dogs, typically older dogs, may be incontinent or have an overactive bladder. It is important to pay attention to your dog’s bathroom habits, and if he seems to have an overactive bladder then it is very important to take him outside frequently. Keeping him in a crate may cause him to go to the bathroom in the crate.  

Urinary Tract or Kidney Infection

If your dog has a urinary tract infection, he may feel the urge to pee more often than not. He may feel the urges to go to the bathroom, and may pee in various locations around the house. This includes his crate if he is left alone for a period of time. If your dog has stones or crystals in his bladder, this may also cause him to have the urge to pee.

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What to do if your Dog is Urinating in His Crate

If your dog is peeing in his crate, and you feel he has not been in it very long, you may wish to contact your veterinarian. Your veterinarian will want to know information about your dog’s lifestyle and his environment, particularly his urination habits and how long he is in his crate. Once your veterinarian learns more about your dog, he may choose to do a few tests to check his kidneys and urine.

He may perform blood work, a urinalysis, and a biochemistry profile to get an overview of your dog’s health. Depending on the results of these tests, he will decide on the proper treatment plan.

If your dog has no health issues, your veterinarian may talk with you and give you advice on crate training. He may give you helpful tips on what to do before you put him in confinement and how often to take him outside to urinate. If your veterinarian feels you are keeping him in his crate for too many hours, he will let you know, and may advise you on getting someone to let him out in between that time period.

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Prevention of Urinating in His Crate

There are ways to prevent your dog from peeing in his crate. The main thing you can do is to limit his time in the cage. It is important to be sure your companion pees outside before you put him in confinement, and to not leave him in there for more eight hours, if he is a healthy adult dog. Some professionals recommend no more than six hours. Also, it is important your dog gets an adequate amount of exercise before going into the crate.

Another way to help prevent your dog from peeing in the crate is to keep his regular check-ups and veterinary visits. This will allow you to be proactive in your dog’s overall health and catch any type of urinary tract infection early, if one should start.

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Cost of Urinating in His Crate

For urinary tract infections in dogs, the price may be approximately $350. For crate training issues, and for hiring a behavioral therapist or trainer, the cost may be $350.

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Urinating in His Crate Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Summer

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Mastiff

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4 Years

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Moderate severity

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Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Potty Problems

My mastiff mix was aged around 4 years old she’s a rescue so I don’t know much information, but I do know that she was a stray. There are some signs that she might have been a house pet before but she has been urinating in her bed and I created her for the first time and she urinated inside the crate as well not sure what steps to take or if this is a health concern. She is always walked and taken out before she’s crated. I really want to properly crate train and house train her. She is so sweet, there is a possibility she may have some anxiety as well, when left alone. She was also very recently spayed, could that contribute to urination? She no longer takes the pain meds.

Aug. 5, 2018

Summer's Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

The first thing that you may want to do is to have some blood work done to make sure that Summer doesn't have any underlying health problems with her body or bladder. Some dogs have chronic bladder infections that make house training almost impossible. If she is healthy, then consistency in walking her and taking her out frequently should help - without knowing what her last 4 years were like, she may take a long time to change that behavior.

Aug. 5, 2018

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Abby

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Wire Terrier

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4 Years

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Fair severity

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Fair severity

Has Symptoms

Urinating In Crate And Bed

My female 4 1/2 year old Wire Terrier urinates about 2 nights a week in her crate. She goes out before going to bed and was only in crate for about 7 hrs at night. Now we have all 3 dogs in bed with us and after 9 nights in bed with us on the 9th night she pees in the bed. She has no medical issues and we cannot figure out why she is peeing at night - either in her crate or on our bed and not every night. We know she does not like going out in the rain, so we sometimes expect accidents during the day.

July 8, 2018

Abby's Owner

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0 Recommendations

There are different causes for urinating in the crate or in your bed which may include medical and behavioural causes; I cannot rule out medical causes without an examination but hormonal responsive incontinence may be a cause if she has been spayed, you should discuss with your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 8, 2018

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