How to Train a Great Dane Puppy to Not Jump

Medium
2-4 Weeks
Behavior

Introduction

Have you ever had a Great Dane jump up on you? Have you ever been flat on your back with 150 pounds of dog on your chest? Usually, the two happen simultaneously!  


Great Danes love people, and they usually want to show it by getting as close to you as possible. But because of their very large size, this can be dangerous. Not only can a large, heavy Great Dane knock a person over easily, but a Great Dane on its back legs is as tall or taller than a human. Because of their height, this puts their front paws, complete with claws, at face level! Injury from a misplaced paw on the face or eye can be serious.  

Owners should train their Great Dane as a puppy, not to jump up on people as a matter of both manners and safety. Consistency is the best way to train your Great Dane puppy not to jump up, so this nasty habit does not continue on into adulthood. The trick is usually getting everyone in the household, including visitors, to adhere to the “no jumping” rule. After all, that Great Dane puppy is pretty cute,  just remind everyone jumping won't be cute when he is full grown.

Defining Tasks

To teach your Great Dane puppy not to jump up on you, family members, or guests, you will need to remove the reward for jumping, which in most cases is to get as close to you as possible. Removing yourself from the situation when your puppy jumps up and not rewarding him with attention, even negative attention, will be key to successfully ending jumping behaviors. Avoid punishment, as even negative attention can reward an attention-hungry Great Dane. Teaching your Great Dane puppy an alternative behavior such as 'sit' that is incompatible with jumping is a good technique for managing jumping in a puppy.  An alternative method is to make your young dog stand on his haunches, past the point where it is rewarding for him, so he avoids it in the future. This method should be used carefully, and by a handler that is used to working with young dogs, so as not to cause injury or fear, or reinforce the behavior. Remember, you are trying to discourage him, not punish or hurt your dog.  

Getting Started

The most important thing to do in training your Great Dane puppy will be to get everyone on board. Consistency is very important, you do not want anyone to reinforce jumping by not sticking to your training plan. Using treats to reinforce alternate behaviors, such as 'sit' that are incompatible with jumping, will also be useful. Remember to be patient with your young Great Dane and avoid punishments that will confuse him.

The Make Jumping No Fun Method

Effective
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Step
1
Grab paws
When your Great Dane pup jumps up on you, take hold of his paws before he puts them on you.
Step
2
Make your dog stand
Hold your dog’s paws until your puppy becomes tired of standing on his back feet, when he show signs of this, let his paws go and allow him to put them back on the floor.
Step
3
Step into your dog
When your Great Dane puppy starts to jump up, take a step into him rather than away. This puts your dog off balance and forces him to put his paws back on the ground.
Step
4
Do not frighten
Be careful not to injure or frighten your dog with either of these techniques, be careful that he does not fall over and hurt himself.
Step
5
Repeat
Repeat and alternate stepping into or making your dog stand past when he is comfortable, to discourage jumping behavior.
Recommend training method?

The Extinguish Jumping Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Turn away
When your Great Dane pup starts to jump up, cross your arms over your chest and turn your body away.
Step
2
Freeze
Do not yell at or speak to your dog, ignore him completely. Be a tree.
Step
3
Leave
If your Great Dane continues to jump, walk away. Leave the room or area. Return later when your dog calms down.
Step
4
Approach again
When you return, if your Great Dane jumps up again, turn and leave. If he stays on the ground, praise and give a treat and attention.
Step
5
Repeat
Repeat over several days, withdrawing attention for jumping, providing it when paws are on the ground.
Recommend training method?

The Alternate Behavior Method

Effective
0 Votes
Step
1
Teach 'sit'
Teach your Great Dane puppy to sit. Provide treats to reinforce the command “sit” and the behavior.
Step
2
Use when distracted
Give the command for the alternate behavior in distracting situations, such as outside in the yard or on walks. Practice often so your puppy thinks this is a great trick that brings him attention.
Step
3
Use 'sit' when jumping occurs
When your Great Dane starts to jump up on you or someone else, provide the command for 'sit'.
Step
4
Reinforce paws on ground
If your Great Dane sits instead of jumping, provide lots of attention and praise.
Step
5
Establish 'sit'
If your Great Dane continues to jump up, turn away or have your guest turn their back on your young dog. When the dog hesitates, repeat the command for 'sit'. Reward if your dog complies. If he does not, remove him from the situation. Continue to practice 'sit' and try again later.
Recommend training method?
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Written by Laurie Haggart

Published: 02/09/2018, edited: 01/08/2021

Success Stories and Training Questions

Training Questions and Answers

Question
Law
Great Dane
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Law
Great Dane
1 Year

Roommate has a great dane she never trained. He constantly jumps on people, digs, and barks at nothing. The jumping is probably the most problematic as he is close to, if not full sized, already.

Caitlin Crittenden
Caitlin Crittenden
Dog Trainer
822 Dog owners recommended

Hello Rise, Resolving this will depend a lot on your roommates cooperation. I would suggest having your roommate practice the leash method with a prong collar if there are no aggression issues. Also, when pup catches you by surprise and jumps anyway, once pup is up on you already (prevention is the real goal) walk toward pup instead of backing away to gwt pup off. If there are aggression issues, hire a professional trainer because working with the dog on your own could be dangerous. For the digging, supervision and a deterrent need to be the goal. If pup is digging in a certain area, I suggest looking into an outdoor pet barrier device, such as https://www.chewy.com/petsafe-pawz-away-outdoor-pet/dp/48581?utm_source=google-product&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=hg&utm_content=PetSafe&utm_term=&gclid=Cj0KCQiA0ZHwBRCRARIsAK0Tr-r27g_yVGawPv0jZxbZnY03Z1LeiCty9nHXi6wwt8uObMMBF3GKx2YaAkOLEALw_wcB For the barking, check out the Quiet and Desensitize methods from the article linked below. https://wagwalking.com/training/train-a-shih-tzu-puppy-to-not-bark Best of luck training, Caitlin Crittenden

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Question
Duke
Great Dane
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
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Duke
Great Dane
1 Year

Duke is always jumping. Especially when we take him for walks. He will jump constantly and pull the lead with his mouth. It’s very challenging to stop him from jumping around and pulling the lead. Even when we aren’t walking him, he is always jumping. He is 70kg, so it’s an issue we really need to fix asap! Thank you so much, Amy.

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Hello. Here is some information on jumping. Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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Question
Ruca
Great Dane
1 Year
0 found helpful
Question
0 found helpful
Ruca
Great Dane
1 Year

We have done training with our dog. Jumping seems to be our most problematic area. Me being with her the most (I am female), she only jumps on me. We can be with multiple other people and she will only jump on me. Or if we are on a walk she will jump on me when she is more tired. I will try the 1st method more of stepping into her while holding her front paws. Just wondering if there is a reason it is only me... Thanks!

Alisha Smith
Alisha S., Dog Trainer
221 Dog owners recommended

Jumping: Teach your dog that they receive no attention for jumping on you or anyone else. Teach your dog to do something that is incompatible with jumping up, such as sitting. They can't sit and jump up at the same time. If they are not sitting, they get no attention. It is important to be consistent. Everyone in your family must follow the training program all the time. You can't let your dog jump on people in some circumstances, but not others. Training techniques: When your dog… Jumps on other people: Ask a family member or friend to assist with training. Your assistant must be someone your dog likes and wants to greet. Your dog should never be forced to greet someone who scares them. Give your dog the "sit" command. (This exercise assumes your dog already knows how to "sit.") The greeter approaches you and your dog. If your dog stands up, the greeter immediately turns and walks away. Ask your dog to "sit," and have the greeter approach again. Keep repeating until your dog remains seated as the greeter approaches. If your dog does remain seated, the greeter can give your dog a treat as a reward. When you encounter someone while out walking your dog, you must manage the situation and train your dog at the same time. Stop the person from approaching by telling them you don't want your dog to jump. Hand the person a treat. Ask your dog to "sit." Tell the person they can pet your dog and give them the treat as long as your dog remains seated. Some people will tell you they don't mind if your dog jumps on them, especially if your dog is small and fluffy or a puppy. But you should mind. Remember you need to be consistent in training. If you don't want your dog to jump on people, stick to your training and don't make exceptions. Jumps on you when you come in the door: Keep greetings quiet and low-key. If your dog jumps on you, ignore them. Turn and go out the door. Try again. You may have to come in and go out dozens of times before your dog learns they only gets your attention when they keep all four feet on the floor. Jumps on you when you're sitting: If you are sitting and your dog jumps up on you, stand up. Don't talk to your dog or push them away. Just ignore them until all four feet are on the ground. Please let me know if you have additional questions. Thank you for writing in!

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