Tooth Removal in Dogs

Veterinary reviewed by: Dr. Linda Simon, MVB MRCVS

Tooth Removal in Dogs - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention

Veterinary reviewed by: Dr. Linda Simon, MVB MRCVS

Tooth Removal in Dogs - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention
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What is Tooth Removal?

Whilst many canine dental problems can be solved with a proper cleaning of the mouth, sometimes a more drastic solution is required to ensure the dog's wellbeing. Surgical removal of a dog's tooth is usually seen as a last resort after all other treatment methods have been found ineffective. When a vet advises a tooth is removed, it is because they know it is the best thing for the patient.

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Tooth Removal Procedure in Dogs

A general anesthetic is required before surgery can proceed. The vet will then assess the root structure of the tooth using oral x-rays in order to plan the extraction. The tooth is usually pulled out by pulling back the gums and using a drill to dislodge the root from its mooring in the jawbone. An incision along the base of the gums may be required to assist in this. Once freed from the jawbone, the tooth can be pulled out and any root fragments removed. The final step is to suture the wound closed. The procedure should usually take no more than an hour in total.

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Efficacy of Tooth Removal in Dogs

By extracting the entirety of the affected tooth, surgical removal of a dog's tooth will usually eliminate the problem altogether (although antibiotics will be required in the event of infection). Whilst other teeth may be at risk of developing similar problems (especially if the dog has poor dental health in general), the vet will almost certainly go over some preventative options with the owner.

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Tooth Removal Recovery in Dogs

Following surgery, the dog will require a regular dosage of painkillers due to the fact that several nerve endings will have been severed during the procedure. Furthermore, owners should monitor their dog over the next few weeks to make sure that they are recovering properly. Warning signs include wincing and continued bleeding (caused by the wound opening up again), as well as facial swelling (which may be indicative of an infection). There will be a couple of follow-up visits required in order for the vet to check that the incision is healing properly. Sutures should dissolve with time and the vet will check to ensure this has happened.. All told, the healing process should take approximately two weeks to complete.

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Cost of Tooth Removal in Dogs

The price of tooth extraction can cost anywhere between $500 and $800. The cost of the procedure fluctuates depending on the overall health of the individual dog, their size and the potential complexity of the required tooth or teeth removal.

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Worried about the cost of Tooth Removal treatment?

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Dog Tooth Removal Considerations

Whilst a tooth extraction is a relatively quick and straightforward operation, there are a couple of aspects that may give some dog owners pause for thought. The first is the necessity of general anesthetic - something that can be especially dangerous to older dogs (who are also the most likely to require the operation) or those with underlying health issues. Second is the question of whether extraction is appropriate in their specific case. Remember though, an extraction will only be advised by a vet when they feel it is in your dog' best interest. If your vet has told you your dog needs an extraction, the longer the tooth is left in their mouth, the higher the risk of significant infection and chronic pain.

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Tooth Removal Prevention in Dogs

Although some types of infections (such as those incurred from injuries or foreign bodies) are unforeseeable, maintaining a good standard of dental health in your dog will prevent the most common conditions that precipitate tooth extraction. Ensuring that your animal eats good quality food and receives regular dental cleaning will prevent the buildup of harmful grime and bacteria in the mouth, saving them from the pain of tooth decay and infection. 

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Tooth Removal Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Guinnie

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Rhodesian Ridgeback

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13 Years

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0 found helpful

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0 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Swelling

My large breed dog is 13. After a few minutes chewing on her raw bone marrow, her cheek swelled up. Vet and Specialist said she would need to do an extraction of the tooth with the abscess (no swelling currently) and most likely several other teeth that looks chipped and smaller ones in front that are dead and slightly infected, He also thinks the other side will swell as well at one point. My dog doesn't appear to be in any pain, breath smells fine. I'm afraid at 13 to have to put her through anesthesia. Her recent blood work last month came back clean, thyroid test also was fine. A year and a half ago she came down with an autoimmune disease and it was a very long and difficult recovery but she is doing well. (Still don't know what caused it) She eats well, exercises daily, and although she is more fragile and arthritic at age 13, overall she appears to be in good health (no meds). I worry if this is something that should be done and how risky it is. I would do this procedure with a specialist and not a regular vet. He said he would only keep her under anesthesia for no more than 1 hour. That sounds really long to me. She is so important to me and wonder how necessary it is to put her through this? I also have yet to find any info online where a dog didn't have a extraction done after a tooth abscess.

Aug. 15, 2018

Guinnie's Owner

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0 Recommendations

Any suitability for general anaesthesia is down to the Veterinarian performing the procedure; whilst Guinnie is a senior dog and past the breed average life expectancy, if she is otherwise in good health and has been cleared for anaesthesia by your Veterinarian there should be few concerns on your side. However, if the dental extractions are not done an abscess can get larger, destroy bone and cause other complications if it cannot be medically managed; your Veterinarian would be able to tell you more. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Aug. 15, 2018

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Sophie

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Poodle x Lhasa Apso

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Five Years

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0 found helpful

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Has Symptoms

Fever. Lack Of Appetite. Limping

My dog began limping and the vet told us it was due to an abscessed tooth. They removed the tooth and it has been a bit over a month now and she is still limping with recurring fevers almost every other day or so. The vet kept saying to keep giving her antibiotics etc, but she is not getting better and it seems like they are not diagnosing the real issue at hand. We were planning to get her spayed once she got better but it is not happening. We have spent over a thousand dollars and I do not have any money at the moment to continuously keep getting a run around. Do you think it is a much more internal issue or is there something we can do? Currently feeling helpless.

Aug. 6, 2018

Sophie's Owner

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0 Recommendations

I don’t believe that the limping is related to the dental issue and think they are two separate issues which should be addressed separately; there are many causes for limping but without examining Sophie I cannot say what the specific cause for the limping is. If you’re not getting far with treatment, you may want to consult another Veterinarian in your town for an examination to get other point of view on the condition. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Aug. 6, 2018

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