Activities For Dog With Deafness

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Introduction

Upon getting a new dog, the first thing a dog owner normally does is to give their new pup a name. When they do not respond to this, or to any other verbal cues, then there is a good chance that they are deaf. Unfortunately, deaf dogs have earned a reputation of being “untrainable” and incapable of living a normal dog life. However, dogs are known to have heightened senses; they first experience the world through their smell, then their sight and, finally, through sound. Hence, the four other senses can easily make up for the lack of sound. As deaf dog owners, you are given an exceptional chance at truly communicate with your dog and be in tune with each other. 

Hiking

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Sunny Day
Free
Normal
1 - 2 hrs
Items needed
Waste Bags
Leash or harness
Food
Water
Activity description

Hiking is one of the most fun and physically challenging things that you can do with your dog. The great part about hiking is that it caters to all senses. For deaf dogs, hiking is no more difficult compared to a dog with hearing abilities, since all other senses are stimulated. Another thing about hiking is that you allow your dog to catch sight of beautiful views and smell some new things along the way, which helps make up for their lack of hearing. It also doubles as a good workout session; you get to keep your dog both healthy and entertained. Hiking areas and state parks are usually open to public but be mindful of the rules when it comes to bringing dogs along.   

Step
1
Find a hiking spot
In order to go on a hike, you would need to find a safe and suitable hiking spot to go to. Nearly every city in the United States offers an opportunity for hiking, be it on a trail, state park, and more. The spot you will ultimately decide on will be based on your preferences, including its proximity, how dog-friendly it is, and other factors you might be looking for.
Step
2
Set off on your hike
When you find the hiking spot that meets all the requirements that you have, prepare all the things you will need. Pack enough food and hydration for you and your dog. Some hiking areas require dogs to be kept on a leash at all times while others allow dogs to go off leash so take note of that and bring a leash just to be safe. Make your way to your hiking spot and spend some active quality time with your buddy. Enjoy the scenery and be sure to leave the trekking area as pristine as you found it!
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Tracking

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Sunny Day
Free
Normal
1 - 2 hrs
Items needed
Harness or leash
Items to track
Track markers
Treats
Activity description

Tracking is an activity that mainly involves leaving behind of certain “articles” for your dog to find. It is an ideal activity for your deaf dog, mainly because the most important sense being utilized in this activity is the sense of smell. What’s more, tracking is a great way to train your dog’s skills. But, most importantly, this activity allows for better trust and respect between dog and owner. It requires you to put a lot of faith in your dog, which will help you form an even closer bond than you already have. Tracking is usually best done outdoors during good weather and can be done free of charge. You may take about 1 to 2 hours per day training your dog to track, depending on your goals and how experienced you want your dog to become.

Step
1
Find a place for tracking
When tracking, the place is as important as any other element. Naturally, if your dog will be doing this for the first time, you would not want to choose too hard or too long of a trail. Find a place that is in accordance with your dog’s skills and experience. This can change as the training goes along and you may start to choose longer and harder trails once your dog gets the hang of it.
Step
2
Choose the items to track
Once you have the area secured, you can get started by distinguishing which items you would want your dog to track. Most owners find leather gloves or wallets to be the best option. Make sure that they get a hefty whiff of the item and that they know the smell well before you leave the items behind.
Step
3
Start the search
After you have left the items behind and laid down your “track”, put your dog on a harness or leash and walk with your dog while going through the trail. Also, observe as your dog uses the sense of scent to pick up and find your items. Always keep them leashed and close to you. Remember, if they somehow get away from you, calling out their name would be useless. Don’t forget to reward your dog for a job well done.
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Obedience Training

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Any Day
Free
Normal
1 - 2 hrs
Items needed
Treats
Activity description

Yes, it is possible for deaf dogs to go through obedience training even without a sense of hearing. Visual cues and signals are just as good as verbal ones. However, with the added challenge of training a deaf dog, you will need a whole lot of patience and determination. When doing obedience training, always use hand signals and remember which hand signals you used for each command that you are training. If you want, you may even draw the signals and display them somewhere where you can see them easily. This activity is free and only requires time and fortitude but the benefits are priceless. More than just getting your dog to follow your commands, you also get to build better communication and understanding between you and your dog. 

Step
1
Start with the basics
With most processes, you have to start with the basics before moving to other commands. Pick a common and simple command that your dog can use frequently, such as “sit”. Try to command your dog to sit and choose a hand gesture that you will be associating with this command. Remember, training a deaf dog is just the same as training any regular dog, but with the addition of hand signals. Speak as you train, even if your dog cannot hear you, since dogs are experts in reading body language.
Step
2
Reward your dog
After repeatedly doing the commands, do not forget to reward your dog for a job well done. This can be done either with signs of affection and affirmation (belly rubs, pat on the back and the head) or through giving of dog treats. You can then move on to the next command that you would like your dog to learn. It is important that you do not overwhelm your dog and that you take breaks in between or put off training for the next day.
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More Fun Ideas...

Dine Out

Take your dog out for a date while enjoying a meal out. There are several options for pet-friendly restaurants, most of which have outdoor patios exclusively for dogs. Some places even have pet menus so you can go and buy your dog a meal. 

Go Shopping

Who says only humans like shopping? Your dog can have loads of fun shopping where they get to feast their eyes on various items that they like. There are lots of dog boutiques where owners can shop with their dogs and there are numerous treats available for canines.

Conclusion

Having a deaf dog should not hinder you from enjoying activities and spending some much needed quality time with your pup. Deaf dogs are special in their own way and should be treated with the same love and respect as any other dog. Any of these activities are good options when looking to spend time with your dog.