Activities For Dog With Gastritis

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Introduction

Gastritis is an inflammation of the gastrointestinal lining of the stomach, and it can occur in humans and dogs alike. When a dog has gastritis, their stomach can become quite irritated when ingesting food, but it is quite common, unfortunately. Often, dogs will eat something that they are not supposed to, which can cause inflammation. Gastritis can be acute or chronic, and it is important that you know the signs and symptoms so you can help your dog feel better, and prevent other diseases. During a bout of gastritis, all normal physical activities will cease due to your pet's lethargy. This is the time to be near them while letting them have space if need be.

Recognizing the Signs

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Any Day
Free
Normal
12 - 24 hrs
Items needed
notebook
pen
Activity description

The first thing to do when fighting gastritis is to recognize the signs and symptoms in your dog so you can properly treat them and help them feel better. Since gastritis can be associated with other conditions that may be more serious and severe, it is important to take notes of all the symptoms you notice so you can tell your vet in detail what you have observed. The vet will be able to assess the situation and properly diagnose your dog. Observe your dog a day to figure out what is wrong with them, take notes, and make sure to make them as detailed as possible, so your vet can have a clearer picture of what is going on.

Step
1
Vomiting
One of the main signs of gastritis is vomiting. If your dog eats something that does not agree with their stomach, they may vomit, but that does not necessarily mean that they have arthritis. What you are looking for is excessive vomiting, and that vomit may include yellow bile.
Step
2
Lethargy
Another sign of gastritis is lethargy, depression, lack of appetite, and overall unwillingness to play or participate in activities is another sign. If your dog does not seem like themselves, something is surely wrong, and you should note that as well and let your vet know.
Step
3
Other symptoms
Other symptoms may include dog anorexia, increased thirst, and dehydration, which you should try to avoid at all costs, diarrhea, blood in stool, as well as black and tarry stool, hunched back that signifies pain, as well as blood in the vomit. Be aware of what is going on and tell your vet everything you have noted.
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Diagnosis

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Moderate
Normal
2 - 3 hrs
Items needed
Leash
Activity description

Provided that you have been observing your dog’s behavior for the past day or two and noticed that something is not quite right with them, it is time to take them to the veterinarian. Never try to diagnose your dog yourself, unless you are a professional veterinarian of course. Usually, your vet will diagnose gastritis by performing a detailed physical exam, taking blood tests, and ordering a urinalysis. The blood work will show your vet if your dog is dehydrated, if gastritis is of a long-term nature, and if it was caused by liver disease or ulcers, or maybe even a weak immune system. While at the vet, reassure your dog with a calm, soothing voice.

Step
1
Tests
Prepare your dog for the series of test they are about to go through. It is important for you to keep calm and not panic, as your dog will sense your distress and will probably start panicking too. Be there for them and provide a lot of love and affection through the process.
Step
2
Essentials
Some of the most important tests will be CBC, urinalysis, abdominal radiograph, ultrasound or endoscopy. Apart from these tests, your vet will perform a detailed physical examination which will show them if your dog is bloated, if their stomach is swollen, and if it is tender and painful.
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Treatment

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Any Day
Moderate
Normal
24 - 72 hrs
Items needed
medicine
ice
food
water
Activity description

When your dog is diagnosed, your vet will let you know about the methods of treatment you can apply to heal them and make them feel better again. The first thing your vet will probably do is give them IV fluids to restore the electrolytes your pet lost while vomiting. After that, you will get medication that you have to give your dog. Some antibiotics will probably be prescribed, as well as anti-emetics, and these meds will help treat the bacterial infection and control the vomiting. Of course, the recovery will take several days, and during the first 24 to 48 hours, you should only give your pup very small amounts of water. 

Step
1
Recovery
In the first two days, give water to your dog sparingly, only a small amount every few hours. After that, your vet will allow the reintroduction of food, but make sure that the food will not irritate their stomach and cause more trouble. While the water is withheld, you may give your dog ice chips to keep them hydrated.
Step
2
Diet
Your dog will most probably need to go on a special diet to heal. Your vet will probably suggest a low-fat diet in the next several days. You can give them boiled pumpkin in small doses, as it will improve their digestion, boiled rice, and roasted beets, which will reduce the inflammation in their stomach.
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More Fun Ideas...

Brushing

Your dog will most likely want to have interaction with you as they heal. Have them lay down and lightly brush them with a gentle motion. This may have a massaging effect, allowing them to relax.

Prevention

The best way to treat gastritis is to prevent it, so in the future, try to keep your dog away from the indigestible things and trash. Don’t allow them to freely roam without supervision, as they can eat things they are not supposed to, which can upset their stomach and cause gastritis.

Diet Change

To prevent future outbursts of gastritis, make sure that your dog is on a healthy diet. This means giving them foods which will not upset their stomach. They may include low-fat options, such as cooked rice, pasta, potatoes, pumpkin, and some proteins such as skinless boiled chicken, ground beef, also boiled, tofu, and even non-fat cottage cheese. 

Conclusion

After the worst is over, most dogs will get a good prognosis from their vet. If possible, try to find out what the cause of gastritis is so that you can be prepared and avoid the irritants. If gastritis was acute, the vomiting would stop as soon as you remove the irritant. However, if the cause was of a chronic nature, your dog may need to stay in the hospital for some time. During the healing period, make sure to provide a lot of love and affection to make your dog feel safe, and to make the recovery period easier for them. Your veterinarian will advise on the amount of activity that is permitted, which may include very short walks to start.