Activities For Dogs In Australia

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Introduction

Australia is a great place for outdoor living, with an abundance of beautiful beaches at the disposal of people and their pets. There are many pet friendly beaches and lush parks that you can take your dog to. The Hinterland also provides outdoor trails and forest walks that can offer a range of exercise options from easy to experienced only. But, be aware that the great outdoors is not always welcoming to your dog. Some parks, trails and beaches are off limits, so check with the local council before heading out for the day. Pet friendly beaches offer the opportunity to plan many activities for your dog, from a doggie get together where the dogs play their games, to playing 'fetch' on the golden sands. If your dog likes to dig, take a toy or two along and hide it in the sand, and they can dig to their heart's content. These activities give your dog an opportunity to socialise with other people and their pets. It also allows the space for some serious exercise, and not only for your dog, as you can join in as well. One thing to be aware of is the heat of the day. Some breeds of dogs are more prone to heatstroke than others, so in the midday heat, look after your pooch. Provide plenty of fresh, clear water, and ensure that they have time to relax.

Fetch On the Beach

Popular
0 Votes
Any Day
Cheap
Normal
30 - 60 Minutes
Items needed
Bags for Waste Disposal
Treats for rewards
Tennis Ball
Strong stick
Fresh water to drink
Activity description
Playing fetch on the beach is a fun way to give your dog the opportunity to race around like a lunatic and not get in anyone's way! They will learn valuable socialising skills as other dogs join in the game, and they will learn to cooperate in a group. The sand provides an excellent base for running, bouncing and jumping, and will burn off any excess energy your dog has. Remember to bag and remove any dog poop your dog may produce. Some beaches in Australia have heavy penalties if you don't. Keeping your dog on a leash until you get to the dog friendly beach is also another wise rule to adhere to. Once the sand is seeping between your pet's paws, let them loose to explode onto the beach, chase the waves, and have a swim. Once they have done that, initiate a game of fetch! What more could a dog want - sand, sea and your company!
Step
1
Set it up
This step is easy, all you need to do is to carry a ball with you, get your dog's attention, then throw the ball along the beach. Chasing a ball seems like a natural reaction to a pup, though getting them to return it to you can be tricky for dogs new to the game. After all, you tossed it away, and they got it, so why give it back? This situation calls for a sneaky treat. Offer a tiny treat, and they will drop the ball for it. Then they will get the idea to fetch AND return it.
Step
2
Cool your dog down
It can be hot work racing up and down the beach, chasing a ball. So add a bit of variety and toss the ball into the sea. Not too far out for dogs who are not used to the sea. Let them get their confidence in shallow waves first. The cooling waves will give them a refreshing treat. Another way to vary it is to change what you throw. A stick is always a good alternative to a ball. Remember to carry fresh water to wash out the taste of the ocean and the sand your dog will invariably get in their mouth. Keeping them hydrated is vital.
Step
3
Step it up
Change from a ball to a Frisbee. If you have another person with you, throw the Frisbee to one another, and get your dog to try and intercept the Frisbee. Let them win a few times or they will lose interest. This version is more strenuous as there will be a lot of jumping on soft sand. Don't overdo it, especially if the sun and sand get hot. Other dogs will also want to join in, so keep that in mind.
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Diggity Dog

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Any Day
Free
Normal
30 - 60 Minutes
Items needed
Bags for waste disposal
Beach umbrella
Dog toys
small sand shovel
Water bottle and treats
Activity description
The sand makes a perfect digging medium if your dog is one of those who loves to dig! Some dogs are born diggers, others - well, not so much. But, on the beach it becomes a whole new game. If they dig down near the water line, they can have the cooling sea wash over their creation, filling it in. Then they have to begin again! This activity is a creative output for their abundant energy. It strengthens their legs, and can wear their nails down a fraction or two. Your dog may be joined by others, which is a great way to socialise and gain valuable social skills. The beach offers a lot of fun, but also a learning experience which will benefit your dog. Offer your dog cooled fresh water to drink, as it may be hot work! The sun, sand and water can reflect the heat so make sure your dog doesn't overdo it and get heatstroke. Let them rest occasionally and just chill out. Icy dog treats are a great treat on the beach - just put it on a tray or a frisbee so it doesn't get sand all over it. Not that dogs seem to mind that gritty taste! Bringing along a beach umbrella is also a wise move, both you and your companion may welcome a break from the sun.
Step
1
Dig a hole
Did we mention that you will get some exercise too? For this game you need a hole to hide a cheap small toy in. Begin to dig a hole. With luck, your dog will join in and help. Then show them the toy, and let them have a short playtime with it. Next, take the toy and put it in the hole while your dog sits, watches, and waits.
Step
2
Cover up the toy
While your dog waits, cover up the hole and smooth the sand. Wait a moment or two, then issue the command to 'find' or whatever word you use. For new players to the game, you may have to help them for the first one. But once your dog gets it, they won't need any additional help. Lavish them with praise and pats when they find the toy and return it to you. Then repeat steps one and two again. Warning! You will tire of this one before your dog does.
Step
3
Variations to the game
If you don't have a toy, use a stick. Get your dog to help you find a driftwood stick, then after they have had a chew or two, bury the stick. Another option is to have a toy where you can place a treat inside. Show your dog and let them sniff it before your bury it. They will be keen to get that toy out! Then of course, they have to find out how to get the treat from the toy. This will provide mental and physical stimulation and exercise. When you can finally drag your dog from the beach, be prepared for a doggedly tired pooch who will drop into a deep sleep reliving their day at the beach, with twitches, muffled yaps, and snores.
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Kayaking

Popular
0 Votes
Sunny Day
Moderate
Easy
60 Minutes
Items needed
Bags for Waste Disposal
Kayak
Fresh water to drink
Map of the area
Dog life jacket
Activity description
When you want to do something a little different, take a kayak to the the calm inlets and river tributaries and go cruising. Most dogs love the water, and if they haven't learned how to travel on a kayak, now is a great time to teach them. It is a great opportunity to spend quality time with your dog, and they will love feeling the wind in their ears as they cruise along. Kayaks cost about $25 to $45 for a couple of hours rental if you don't have one of your own. This activity will broaden your dog's experiences and once they get used to the idea, the moment you say 'want to go kayaking?' they will bark with excitement and be ready to go! At first they may be a little hesitant as it is something new, but be patient and let them get used to it in shallow water at first. Once they have their confidence, then you can move out into deeper areas. Don't go out into the surf or off shore on the beaches with an inexperienced dog, as they may get frightened if they are knocked off the kayak by a large wave. Kayaking  is ideal for days when you just want to chill out with your dog. Just have plenty of fresh water for your dog pal to drink, and perhaps a treat or two and they will be your devoted companion as you cruise the blue waters of Australia.
Step
1
Get to the location
If you have your own kayak, then load it up on the car and get going. Otherwise, if renting, call into the outlet you booked it through and pick it up. If you are experienced, then so much the better. If you are not, the kayak shop will help you with safety rules and may even tag along with you to ensure your safety. Many rental outlets have agents on the quiet inlets where they can teach you all about kayaking and will include safety measures to be taken when bringing a canine companion along. A canine life vest, for example, will always be recommended.
Step
2
Ready to go
Load up what you need on the kayak, as in fresh water, oars (tricky to do this activity without them) and your dog. If this is the first time for your dog, take it slowly and use praise and reassurance to build their confidence. Try the activity in shallow water first, so that if your dog hops off, their feet will touch the ground or they can swim to safety. Dogs usually adapt well and enjoy just cruising along the water, the wind in their ears.
Step
3
Take a break
Give the dog the opportunity to explore by stopping a couple of times and getting off the water, so your dog can enjoy exploring the rocks and bay. They will probably need a toilet break if they are a nervous type of dog. Try and make the experience as much fun as possible. Cruising on a kayak with your dog is the epitome of relaxation and a great day out.
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More Fun Ideas...

Market Day

Market Days are a large part of Australian culture. They range from small events to enormous markets. As long as your dog is on a leash, they are welcome to visit with you. It's a pawsitively exciting place for a pooch with lots of yummy smells, plenty of people and lots of dogs around looking to make new friends. Many stalls sell dog toys, apparel, or food. Some of the larger markets even have a dog groomer on hand if your dog needs a hair cut or a bath. The markets are a great place to socialise your dog. It is fun to watch the different breeds greet each other. Your dog can also join you at an outdoor café, with fresh water provided by the establishment for dogs, and treats from your plate (or take your own treats so you dog has a special healthy meal out).

Weaving in the park

You will need something to build a weaving course in the park, cones similar to the ones construction road workers use to direct traffic are ideal. You can buy a toy version of them at a reasonable  price from toy or sports shops. Mark the track up in a long row, ensuring each marker is  a few meters from the other one. The first go might be slow if your dog hasn't played this before, so do it with them. Teach them to go with you and weave from marker to marker, going from left to right and left again as you weave along. Once your dog gets the idea, have them sit at the end and then call them to come from the other end. If they miss a marker, stop them immediately and take them back to do the one they missed. They will soon get the idea, encouraged by a treat for getting it right. This activity teaches obedience, focus and coordination for your dog. And it is just downright fun! You can  do this in the backyard, but the park adds an additional outing for your dog.

Fishing Dog

Many bays and inlets around Australia are brimming with small fish swimming around in shallow water. When you point this out to your dog, they will be intrigued by the movement and will start 'fishing'. While it is doubtful that they will ever catch anything, it will be fun for them. This activity is free and will entertain your dog for hours. Your dog will vary their approach from static waiting and watching for the perfect opportunity, or they will be splashing, lunging and biting at the water. The activity teaches coordination, focus and provides exercise in the water. Some dogs are natural fishing dogs, such as the Labrador Retriever. Others may not be so interested. But it is worth a try and can provide a lot of entertainment, so don't overlook such a simple activity.

Conclusion

Australians are a hardy bunch who love the great outdoors. The fabulous summers have something to do with that, as do the vast stretches of amazing coastline. Many large cities are built beside the ocean to enjoy the cooling sea breezes. People flock to the beaches during public holidays or for private holidays and weekends, especially in summer. Seaside activities are a part of the Australian lifestyle, so why not make it a part of your dog's lifestyle as well? Take full advantage of the parks, recreation areas and coastal regions and go and explore these regions with your dog. Both of you will get the healthy benefits of fresh air and enjoy an outing away from the routine of home life. Always check first that your dog is welcome, as some beaches and parks do not invite dogs. This outdoor lifestyle provides a range of variety for your dog, it adds interest to their day and is a great way to incorporate exercise and training into their routine. But most of all, it's just dog-gone fun!