Activities For Dogs In Tennessee On Hot Days

1k Views
0 Comments
0 Votes

Introduction

While Tennessee is known for many things from Davy Crockett to Moon Pies, it may be best known for what it does best: hot. There're hot country licks, hot chicken, and for nearly half the year, hot weather, which means you'll have to do some serious work to try and escape it. But even when the temperature makes you feel like you might melt, have no fear, Wag! is here in the Volunteer State! Whether you're trying to avoid it completely or soaking it up and trying to keep cool, we've got a great list of places to check out so you're not left to burn like an unattended barbeque.

River Rat

Popular
0 Votes
Hot Day
Cheap
Normal
30 - 180 min
Items needed
Leash
Dog Bags
Doggy Life Preserver
Activity description
There are tons of places you can take your dog for a dip from the kiddie pool in your backyard to the doggy pool to a nearby park's lake or pond, but if you want to get really adventurous, we suggest trying out Smokey Mountain River Rat Tubing Outpost. Not only do they provide comprehensive trips with several different options, but they provide dog-specific tubes and for only $2, and a tether to keep them tied to you so they don't drift off downriver. It will provide them with a new experience and lots of cool water to take a dip in should they get too hot, all for a minimum expense (under $20 for tubes and tethers).
Step
1
Test the waters
Before you sink a bunch of money into a tubing trip, it would be best advised if you tested their comfort with the water first. River Rat suggests only trying it with dogs under 60 lbs, as those over that weight have a higher tendency to pop the tube, which will be no fun for anyone. We recommend this activity only for dogs who are comfortable with the water and can swim (although many parts of the tubing areas are trim and shallow enough to walk in). If you're unsure, test them out at home with a hose or a kiddie pool to see if they even like the water first. Then move onto further tests if possible if they do well, such as trying them out in a tube of your own (or a helpful friend) in a foot or so of water. If they don't panic and jump out, chances are good they'll be brave enough to adjust to their surroundings.
Step
2
Get tubular
Once you're sure they're a good fit for this new activity, call ahead and book a trip. Reservations aren't required but they're a good idea, especially if you're going to guarantee a tube and tether for your dog as well. Before you head to the launch spot, consider whether you think your dog will need a doggy life preserver. If so, call around and find a pet shop that keeps them in stock and pick one up. Otherwise, head over and get yourself checked in and procure all the necessary wristbands and tubes for you and your dog (and any friends should you choose to bring some along). Listen to the staff's instructions, then get your dog settled into their tube before climbing into your own. Once you're both comfortable, you're ready to launch, so go have some fun! And don't forget, there are multiple drop locations so you can either go on the same section of river again or trying something new. Just be aware that not all spots are of equal intensity, so you may want to stick with easier routes for your dog's comfort.
Love this activity?

Spelunker With Your Dunker

Popular
0 Votes
Hot Day
Cheap
Easy
40 - 80 min
Items needed
Leash
Dog Bags
Activity description
When it gets hot, that generally means just about everything is hot. The pavement, the rocks, the air, and sometimes even the grass. So where can you escape it all? By heading underground. Although many people think caves are either hot and stuffy or cold and dank, most caves are surprisingly well- and self-kept environments, many of which maintain a constant and comfortable temperature throughout the year. In Tennessee, one of the best spots of this type to check out is Appalachian Caverns in Blountville. They provide geological and historical insight on their tours as patrons wind their way in and out of the gorgeous sprawling caverns. It's cheap at $12 a ticket, will give you and your dog a cool place to explore and isn't hard for the average dog owner (or dog for that matter).
Step
1
Quick prep
There are several different tours you can take within the caverns, but really, only one of them is suitable for your pooch (the Regular Tour) as the others entail crawling through tight spaces and other feats that your dog may not have the ability to complete. Our best suggestion is to call ahead and book your tour so you're not stuck sitting around and waiting if tour groups get too large. Let them know you plan to bring a dog and ask for any advice they may have to offer on making it a smooth process of touring and exploration. Then, book your tickets if possible.
Step
2
Pave the cave with paws
Once you've got everything in order, grab your dog their leash and some dog bags, then hit the road. You'll need to check in at the front at which point they should let you know where and when your tour departs. Once the time arrives, head in! There are tons of awe-inspiring formations, colors, and sounds, so take it all in yourself while respectfully letting your pooch explore the safe and acceptable bounds of the tour (chances are they won't have many opportunities to do many, if any, other places).
Love this activity?

Springs in Your Step

Popular
0 Votes
Hot Day
Free
Easy
30 - 180 min
Items needed
Leash
Dog Bags
Activity description
While dog parks are great places to check out, they can also be somewhat limiting as far as what families can and can't do. They're rarely a place to go for an outing and therefore fall into their own niche of activities. On the other hand, places like Smith Springs Public Use Area exist, where you can fish, picnic, boat, swim, and a ton of other activities, many of which can include your dog as well. You do have to be wary of other visitors, as you don't want to disturb others or vice versa, especially with a dog, but given its size, there's more than enough space for everyone.
Step
1
Plan it
This space is so open-ended, there's not a ton we can say about how to go about it all. Our best suggestion is to get a basic plan together by seeing who would all like to join you (other dogs included) and what activities they'd like to participate in. You can keep it simple by just going for a swim, or make a day of it by planning on renting a boat, enjoying a picnic, kayaking, swimming or fishing. The park's website is easily the best all-in-one stop for information, so you can see if the group site is available, check the park rules, amenities, and even the weather if need be.
Step
2
Book it and enjoy
You can even book the group site and pay through the website ($40 a day, which is pretty cheap given the size and time allowed). There is a barbecue available as well as electric hookups, so feel free to plan around what is available. Then, when you have everyone contacted and everything planned, you can go enjoy your day out. Bring along your best furry pal and always practice proper etiquette, allowing for an enjoyable time for all visitors to the venue, doggy lovers or not.
Love this activity?

More Fun Ideas...

Park it in the Park

From our research, there are at least 50 dog parks scattered throughout the state. Some of them are small and easy-access while others are beautifully landscaped and sprawling like Sevierville. Do yourself a favor and plan a mini dog park tour of places with water features and lots of shade so you can beat the heat and still have fun.

Shop The Village

In Gatlinburg, there's a fantastic stretch of little specialty shops with a nice walkway that meanders through all of them. Quite a few of the shops are dog-friendly (and this is usually posted outside on signs) and there is even a pet-specific shop you can go in to check out gear, grab a drink, and treats.

The Pyramid of Memphis

Normally large chains don't welcome dogs, but Bass Pro Shop does. Typically we wouldn't recommend taking them to somewhere like this unless it was really special but the Bass Pro Shop in Memphis is. Why? It's a giant pyramid! The place is absolutely huge with tons of stuff to check out, including live bass and ducks (so be cautious with your dog) plus tons of outdoor dog gear.

Conclusion

Now that we've given you some cool ideas on how not to burn up in the Tennessee heat, go check them out! If you're looking for further inspiration, see what's nearby in your local area. Many dog owners don't realize that there are plenty of restaurants with dog-friendly patios, pet stores, shops, and doggy bakeries with air conditioning, ice cream parlors that make dog-friendly treats and plenty of other great spots that will help keep you from frying like a chicken. Here's one final hint: don't forget to check out the guides from neighboring states or other Tennessee weather-based activity guides, as there could be something even more perfect for you depending on your time, interests, and location.