Why Do Dogs Go Into Corners

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Common
Irregular

Introduction

Before you head out for an evening with your friends, you decide to feed your dog dinner. As you prepare her meal, you wonder where she is. After putting her meal down in its usual spot, you call her name a few times but she does not respond. You look around the house for her and find her in your bedroom. She looks at you with a calm look on her face. She is curled up in a ball in the corner of your room. Although this positioning seems quite peculiar, there is a reason for your dog’s behavior. Learning why dogs curl up in corners can help you understand your canine better. 

The Root of the Behavior

There are many behaviors that dogs display to tell us hidden messages about their feelings. You may have noticed that your dog hides and relaxes in odd spots around your house. This could be under a bed, in the closet, or in the corner of the room. Small spaces where walls feel supporting can bring your dog comfort and safety during times of exhaustion, worry, and fear. There are a few reasons why your dog may have befriended the corner. The most common reason your dog barricades in the corner of the room is because of fear. Your dog may be experiencing loud noises, new smells and people, mistrust, or even mistreatment. When your dog goes into a corner, the world he is living in may not feel so large. This can be extremely common in puppies that are welcomed into a new home life. 

The second most common reason a dog may hide in the corner is anxiety. Dogs may have anxiety from a wide range of reasons. Sometimes, when you interact with your dog, they can receive anxiety from odd types of play that they are not used to. It is important to be mindful of your canine, especially when you are getting to know them on a deeper level. The last reason for this is depression and old age. If your dog is hiding in the corner, it may be because she truly feels safest in the corner. If she is reaching an older age, the corner will support her in feeling safe around a chaotic environment where interactions may be a bit harder. If your dog is depressed, you will notice many different signs of this from loss of appetite to interest. Hiding or avoiding their regular life can be a huge reason of depression and if your dog is laying in the corner constantly, you may want to be aware of this. 

Encouraging the Behavior

If your dog is spending more time in the corner of the room, it is suggested that you find out why. Your dog may be relaxing in the corner of your room for a wide range of reasons. If your dog is in the corner of the room because it feels safe and comforting, then there is no reason to not allow your dog to sit there. They may feel comfortable with the wall behind them because that means nobody can sneak up on them. If you have small children or other pets in the home, they may be making your dog nervous. If you decide that there may be a bigger issue at hand, it is suggested to not encourage this habit any further. You will want to help your dog heal whatever it is that they are dealing with. From there, you will see changes in your dog’s behavior and hopefully, they will not need to consistently barricade in the corner for safety and comfort. If you feel like you are unsure why your dog is acting this way, you can take your dog to the veterinarian. They may be able to help you evaluate what is occurring within your dog during this time in their life, so you may take proper action. 

Other Solutions and Considerations

If you notice your dog is in the corner a lot, you may want to head over to where they are and talk with them softly. Be gentle with your dog and try to understand their feelings by your own interaction with them. You should be able to sort out what your dog is feeling by this. You may also want to take note of when your dog goes to the corner of the room. Watch the surroundings within your house to see why they are hiding in the corner. Is there chaos? Are there new people around? Take note of any and all changes in their life, so you may alter their environment and help them heal. 

Conclusion

Dogs love to enjoy their lives just as we love to enjoy ours. Yet, they have emotions and fears like humans do. Sometimes, sitting in the corner of a room can be comforting for them when they are in times of uncertainty. It is our job, as owners, to help them work through the pain and come out on the other side.