Cockapin

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10-25 lbs
10-13"
United States
Cocker Spaniel
Miniature Pinscher

The Cockapin dog is a friendly, loyal and loving pet who is good with children, is very active and loves to be part of family life. While they are playful and energetic, they can also be proud and sensitive in nature. The Cockapin is a devoted dog who will show outstanding loyalty and compassion to the moods of their owner. Although small, they are sturdy in build, with a compact body and attractive coat. They are intelligent and will respond well to training although they can sometimes get a little stubborn and it will take patience and calmness to coax them through it. They need an owner who is the pack leader, a weaker owner will be taken advantage of and this little dog will then think he is boss! That sort of situation can lead to behavioral issues so avoid it by starting to train your dog right from puppyhood and you will be rewarded with a loving obedient little dog that will be glued to your side.

Purpose
Companion dog
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Cocker Spaniel and Miniature Pinscher

Cockapin Health

Average Size
Male Cockapin size stats
Height: 12-15 inches Weight: 12-30 lbs
Female Cockapin size stats
Height: 10-13 inches Weight: 10-25 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Cataracts
  • Glaucoma
  • Otitis Interna and Media
Minor Concerns
  • Entropion
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia (IMHA)
Occasional Tests
  • X-Rays
  • Ear Examination
  • Blood Tests
  • Ocular Tests
  • Full Body Physical Examination especially of the joints
  • History of your dog analysis may be required

Cockapin Breed History

Until the Cockapin can boast about its own history over time, it is advisable to look at the history of the parent breeds to see what influences that may have on your dog. The Cocker Spaniel dates back to the 14th Century and originated from the English Cocker Spaniels that were bought to the United States of America. Once in the USA, breeders bred the Spaniels down in size and called these smaller dogs the American Cocker Spaniel. These small Spaniels were used in hunting and retrieving game and became known as ideal to work in difficult terrain – both wet and dry areas. The Cocker Spaniel excelled at flushing out and retrieving game using their soft gentle mouths. The name ‘Cocker’ comes from the Woodcock which is a game bird that the dogs were known for flushing out. The American Cocker Spaniel was first recognised by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1873. These dogs are excellent for tracking, hunting, retrieving, agility and competitive obedience. The Miniature Pinscher is a breed with origins in Germany. They were a result of cross breeding the Dachshund, Italian Greyhound, and the shorthaired German Pinscher. It would be fair to say that the Miniature Pinscher looks like a mini Doberman, as they both were developed from the German Pinscher. This active little dog was used to rid the barns from rats, and controlling the rodent population in the stables. They are alert, agile, full of energy and made ideal watchdogs. The breed was recognised in 1929 by the AKC but reclassified in 1930 as Toys and called Pinscher (Miniature). Finally, in 1972 they were once again renamed to Miniature Pinscher.

Cockapin Breed Appearance

The Cockapin is a visually attractive dog with a short coat that requires minimum maintenance. They attain a maximum height of about 15 inches and have a well-proportioned body with short but strong legs. Their skull is slightly rounded with a strong muzzle in proportion to the head. The teeth should meet in a scissors bite. The eyes are often doe shaped and very expressively dark. The ears may vary depending on the predominance of the parent breed. They can be long, feathered and floppy like the Cocker Spaniel, or they can follow their Miniature Pinscher parent with high set ears that are held erect or slightly folded and high on the head. The dewclaws may be removed and their feet are rounded and may be slightly feathered in character. The Cockapin is an appealing small dog who is very people orientated.

Eye Color Possibilities
brown Cockapin eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Cockapin nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
white Cockapin coat
White
black Cockapin coat
Black
red Cockapin coat
Red
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Cockapin straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Cockapin Breed Maintenance

The Cockapin is easy to maintain, needing only an occasional brushing with a firm brush to keep their silky coat looking good. Rather than constant bathing, this dog will be fine with a gentle damp rubdown to keep them smelling sweet. It is advisable to ensure your Cockapin puppy is trained to have her teeth brushed at an early age, as well as training her to sit quietly while you gently wipe out and inspect her ears. This practice will soon come to be the highlight of her day as she enjoys all your attention. Grooming time is ideal to check for any cuts or sores, infections or parasites. Finish the inspection with a nail clip if required. The Cockapin sheds little to no hair, so it is a good dog if you don’t want to be vacuuming the house every day!

Brushes for Cockapin
Pin Brush
Comb
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Cockapin requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Cockapin Temperament

The Cockapin are intelligent and friendly dogs that are ideal as family pets. They get along well with children, being a robust small dog, but they can be reserved with other dogs or pets unless they are brought up with them or are well socialised as puppies. The Cockapin is a true companion dog, they love to be with their family and don’t like being left alone. These dogs are not kennel dogs, their home is inside with you. These dogs make ideal apartment dogs but will need a daily outing to wear off some of their energy. Luckily their active nature inside with the family will take care of most of their activity needs. The Cockapin also loves to snuggle up and cuddle on your lap, and will happily lap up all the attention you can give it. While they love to please they tend to have a stubborn trait that will try your patience during training, but with patience and kind handling, they will respond and obey eventually. They are very alert little dogs who make good watch dogs; no one can escape their vigilant observation.

Cockapin Activity Requirements

The Cockapin is an active small dog that requires a daily walk plus time to explore in a well fenced yard or at the dog park. This outing gives your dog valuable time to socialise with other people and pets which ensures a well-rounded happy pet. They do have the instinct to hunt still deep inside them so ensure they are in a secure area or keep them on a leash or your dog may disappear over the horizon as it chases after birds or small creatures. These dogs can adapt well to the country where they love to chase birds all day long, or to the town where they will watch over your home with an observant eye. While they don’t necessarily require a home with a yard, having that extra space will give your active pal plenty to explore, all the while keeping their eyes on you to see what you are up to. Adaptable is a word that sums up the Cockapin, they adjust to most locations and warmer climates beautifully as long as you are there too.

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
10 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
150 minutes

Cockapin Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$0.8 - $1
Monthly Cost
$20 - $30

Cockapin Owner Experiences

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
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