Giant Schnauzer

55-75 lbs
24-26"
Germany
Riesenschnauzer, Bear Schnauzer

The Giant Schnauzer is the largest of the three recognized Schnauzer breeds. He is a working dog that was bred to drive cattle as well as act as a livestock guardian dog. Many people believe that the Standard Schnauzer was cross-bred with the Great Dane and Bouvier des Flandres to produce the Giant Schnauzer. He is not the right dog for a first time dog owner because he can be very demanding and requires intense training. The Giant Schnauzer is very intelligent and is an independent thinker; this makes him sometimes difficult to keep occupied. He is also a high maintenance dog and requires specialized grooming.

Purpose
cattle herding, guarding
Date of Origin
middle ages
Ancestry
great dane, bouvier des flandres

Giant Schnauzer Health

Sketch of Giant Schnauzer
Average Size
Male Giant Schnauzer size stats
Height: 26-28 inches Weight: 60-110 lbs
Female Giant Schnauzer size stats
Height: 24-26 inches Weight: 55-75 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Cobalamin Malabsorption
Minor Concerns
  • Chronic Anemia
  • Autoimmune Thyroiditis
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Hip
  • Blood
  • Thyroid Tests
  • X-Rays
  • Eye Examination
  • Physical Examination

Giant Schnauzer Breed History

There are three Schnauzer breeds. The Standard Schnauzer is the original breed and the Miniature Schnauzer and Giant Schnauzer are derivatives of the Standard Schnauzer. The exact date of origin is unknown for the Giant Schnauzer. It is known that the Standard Schnauzer was depicted in artwork that dates back to 1492 and the Giant Schnauzer was developed some time after that. He was created to be a herder and a livestock guardian dog. To develop the Giant Schnauzer, the Standard Schnauzer was cross-bred with larger dogs such as the Great Dane and the Bouvier des Flandres. The Giant Schnauzer was originally bred to drive cattle to market. By the start of the 20th century, he was no longer being used for that purpose. He was then found guarding breweries, stockyards and butcher shops. The Giant Schnauzer has been trained for police work in the United States and in Europe.  Today, there are not many Giant Schnauzers used for police work due to their size and propensity toward aggression if not properly trained. The Giant Schnauzer was first recognized in the United States by the American Kennel Club in 1930 and is ranked 94th among all the dog breeds in popularity. He is a high maintenance dog that requires specialized grooming. He is also a high energy dog that does require training and plenty of exercise. The Giant Schnauzer is not the best dog for first time dog owners and not ideal for children. The Giant Schnauzer, as his name suggests, is a giant breed and he is a well muscled, working dog who thrives when he has a job to accomplish. 

Giant Schnauzer Breed Appearance

The Giant Schnauzer has a very dense and wiry topcoat with a soft undercoat. His coat does not lay smooth or flat on his back; instead it slightly stands up off the back. The top of his head has coarse hair and his beard and eyebrows are also wiry and coarse. His beard and eyebrows are the signature look of a Schnauzer and are also seen in the Standard and Miniature varieties. A coat that is too soft is not acceptable. The Giant Schnauzer is solid black or pepper and salt colored. Pepper and salt is when the topcoat is a combination of banded hairs that are white with black and black with white and some black and white hairs. This gives a gray appearance when viewed from a distance. The only marking allowed is a small white spot on his chest. All pepper and salt shades are acceptable from silver-gray to dark iron-gray. 

Appearance of Giant Schnauzer
Eye Color Possibilities
brown Giant Schnauzer eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Giant Schnauzer nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
pied Giant Schnauzer coat
Pied
silver Giant Schnauzer coat
Silver
gray Giant Schnauzer coat
Gray
black Giant Schnauzer coat
Black
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Giant Schnauzer wiry coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Giant Schnauzer Breed Maintenance

This breed has a high maintenance coat that requires regular grooming and clipping to achieve the classic Schnauzer look. The distinctive look of the Giant Schnauzer does not occur naturally. The eyebrows, beard and clipped body are all done through precise grooming. Regular grooming of the Giant Schnauzer includes brushing, bathing, clipping the body, ear cleaning and nail trimming. He needs to be properly groomed every six to eight weeks. Most owners take their Giant Schnauzer to a groomer experienced in grooming the Schnauzer breeds. In between trips to the groomer, he will need to be brushed with a pin brush at least once a week. His beard will need to be combed several times a day to remove any food or debris. A clean cloth will need to be handy to dry his beard after he drinks. Water will drip off his beard, giving him the appearance of drooling excessively. A foul smell will develop around his beard if it is not properly cleaned and combed often.

Brushes for Giant Schnauzer
Pin Brush
Dematter
Clipper
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Giant Schnauzer requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Giant Schnauzer Temperament

The Giant Schnauzer is a very intelligent dog. He is also an independent thinker. He is loyal to his family and is a great watchdog. Because of his stubborn nature, he is not recommended for first time dog owners or families with younger children. Training is required to ensure that the Giant Schnauzer knows his role within the family. He also requires a lot of exercise and is happiest when he has a job to do. While the Giant Schnauzer no longer is used to drive cattle, he is used for protection and also does excellent in conformation and obedience events. The Giant Schnauzer takes his job seriously, but he also has a playful streak and loves his toys. Giant Schnauzers that are not properly socialized or are improperly trained can show signs of aggression. Owners of Giant Schnauzers should plan to spend at least 30 minutes per day performing training exercises and another 30 minutes to an hour walking or exercising him.

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
12 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
90 minutes

Giant Schnauzer Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
3 cups
Daily Cost
$2.00 - $2.25
Monthly Cost
$60.00 - $67.50

Giant Schnauzer Height & Weight

6 Months
Sketch of Giant Schnauzer at six months
Male Giant Schnauzer size stats at six months
Height: 23 inches Weight: 47 lbs
Female Giant Schnauzer size stats at six months
Height: 21 inches Weight: 40 lbs
12 Months
Sketch of Giant Schnauzer at 12 months
Male Giant Schnauzer size stats at 12 months
Height: 25 inches Weight: 57 lbs
Female Giant Schnauzer size stats at 12 months
Height: 23 inches Weight: 52 lbs
18 Months
Sketch of Giant Schnauzer at 18 months
Male Giant Schnauzer size stats at 18 months
Height: 27 inches Weight: 85 lbs
Female Giant Schnauzer size stats at 18 months
Height: 25 inches Weight: 65 lbs

Top Giant Schnauzer Breeders

Check out who made our list for the most reputable Giant Schnauzer breeders of 2018.
Top Giant Schnauzer breeder Porter Ranch
Porter Ranch
New Castle, Colorado
Top Giant Schnauzer breeder Fear The Beard Giants Schnauzer Rambadt Farm
Fear The Beard Giants Schnauzer Rambadt Farm
Gravette, Arkansas
Top Giant Schnauzer breeder Tail Gait Farm
Tail Gait Farm
Appomattox, Virginia
Top Giant Schnauzer breeder Happy Trails Giant Schnauzers
Happy Trails Giant Schnauzers
Simpsonville, Kentucky
Top Giant Schnauzer breeder Grande Giant Schnauzers
Grande Giant Schnauzers
Florissant, Colorado
Top Giant Schnauzer breeder Magna Giant Schnauzers
Magna Giant Schnauzers
Hedgesville, West Virginia
Top Giant Schnauzer breeder Hatten’s Giant Schnauzers
Hatten’s Giant Schnauzers
Rock Falls, Illinois
Top Giant Schnauzer breeder Firezone Giant Schnauzers
Firezone Giant Schnauzers
Baltimore, Maryland

Giant Schnauzer Owner Experiences

Rafa Nadal
18 Weeks
2 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
After 14 great years of raising a Bouvier we elected to raise a GS as they seemed quite similar in character. Our GS is more stubborn than we expected and has a strong need to be part of our "pack." Separation anxiety is apparent and he does not like to be left alone. However, he is training quite well and is already 50 pounds large at 18 weeks. He is quite sociable and well behaved.
5 months, 3 weeks ago
2 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walk
sniff
The Giant Schnauzer that I walked was young and had quite a bit of energy. It was constantly excited by the other side of the road and wanted to run to every new thing to get a nice smell of it. It was very affectionate and loving and excited to meet me, and even more excited to get to go out on a walk. Being as large as she was we covered quite a bit of distance together, and she still has a good amount of energy by the end of a thirty minute walk. Not only did she like to smell things, but she seemed to be a very sociable dog and wanted to pee, and even poop, on as many things as possible.
9 months, 4 weeks ago
4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Eating Snacks
Dog Parks
Chase
Run
Walk
Go to Park
The Giant Schnauzer is an uncommon breed. I have only met one in my life. This Giant Schnauzer was very friendly and jumped on me everytime I would leash him up. Once I got him leashed, he was easy to walk as long as I kept up a fast enough pace. He was friendly towards other dogs, but sometimes would play a little too rough for how big he was. As the name implies, they are giant dogs. This in particular one had a wavy coat that picked up dirt and twigs easily, so he needed to be groomed often. He also had digestive issues and had a hard time going poop. He would also get poop stuck in his fur everytime he would go, which was messy to clean up.
10 months ago
5 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Running
Jumping
Walks
smelling
He was in his crate when I walked in but got super excited right away, he wanted to say hi and get out instantly. Once outside nothing could break his focus, not people or other dogs. And he was super energetic but it would come in random spurts lol
10 months ago
8 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Cuddling
Walking
Meet Ellie!! Ellie was probably the most timid and gentle dog I've met to date! But, we walked to Logan Circle and she perked right up and loved exploring, sniffing around, and climbing tree roots! We also explored Franklin Park where she was protecting the park by barking at the tree disposal man high up in the trees. I think Ellie thought the guy was a very large squirrel. But I told her she did her job as the protector of the park and we were on our way again. Despite being shy, this little girl showed how tough she was when she barked at a loud and drunk man walking the street - all while hiding behind my legs! You're a good girl, Ellie!
10 months ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd