Miscarriage in Cats

Veterinary reviewed by: Dr. Linda Simon, MVB MRCVS

Miscarriage in Cats - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

Veterinary reviewed by: Dr. Linda Simon, MVB MRCVS

Miscarriage in Cats - Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

What is Miscarriage?

Miscarriage in cats occurs when there is either a deliberate or unexplained termination of pregnancy in your cat. Miscarriage may be chemically induced under the supervision and/or advice of your vet. It can also occur for a variety or hormonal or physical reasons. If your cat is in the early stages of pregnancy, you may not notice any signs or symptoms and the fetuses may be reabsorbed by your cat’s body. In later stages, your cat may miscarry and then develop maternal instincts and behaviors, up to developing milk and crying or pacing, looking for kittens. If you expect your cat is miscarrying you should seek immediate veterinary care.

Youtube Play

Miscarriage Average Cost

From 373 quotes ranging from $200 - $1,200

Average Cost

$800

Symptoms of Miscarriage in Cats

The symptoms of miscarriage in your cat may be minor if the pregnancy is in the first several weeks. Generally, however, you will see noticeable signs of a miscarriage. These may include:

  • Bloody discharge
  • Disappearance of fetuses previously seen in ultrasound or felt via palpation
  • Abdominal straining
  • Discomfort
  • Depression
  • Dehydration
  • Fever
  • Delivery of premature, dead, or nonviable fetuses
arrow-up-icon

Top

Causes of Miscarriage in Cats

Miscarriage is a condition that may have a variety of underlying causes. While it may not always be possible, it is important to attempt to diagnose the underlying cause of the miscarriage to rule out potential infections or other conditions that may be life-threatening to your cat. Common causes include:

  • Feline leukemia virus
  • Feline herpesvirus
  • Bacterial disease such as chlamydia
  • Protozoal infections
  • Injury
  • Exposure to chemicals known to induce labor or miscarriage
  • Congenital defects
  • Inbreeding resulting in genetic issues
  • Nutritional deficiencies
  • Severe stress
  • Hormonal imbalances
arrow-up-icon

Top

Diagnosis of Miscarriage in Cats

Diagnosis of miscarriage in your cat will begin with a thorough physical exam. If your cat has miscarried at home, you should arrange to bring any aborted fetuses with you for your vet to examine, if possible. The fetuses may provide important clues regarding the underlying cause of the miscarriage. In the initial visit, your vet may choose to order ultrasound or x-ray imaging in order to confirm there are no additional fetuses retained. Living fetuses may need support in order to avoid being miscarried and dead fetuses will need to be removed from the cat in order to avoid infection and potential death to your pet. These images will also allow examination of the internal organs of your cat.

During the initial exam, you should provide a thorough history of your cat’s pregnancy. Approximate date of impregnation and identity of the sire, if known, may be important facts for a proper diagnosis. Onset of symptoms and length of time of any unusual behavior such as lack of eating or your cat beginning to nest, will also be helpful.

Your vet will also order a full blood panel. This will allow your veterinarian to identify the presence of any infection and will provide an analysis of various hormone levels throughout your cat’s body. If there are signs of a cold or infection, various smears from the nose, ears and mouth should also be taken to potentially identify an upper respiratory or other type of infection. A stool sample may also be ordered in order to test for parasites.

arrow-up-icon

Top

Treatment of Miscarriage in Cats

Treatment of your cat after miscarriage will depend on whether she needs to be stabilized and the underlying cause of the miscarriage. In the event there are retained fetuses, your vet may administer drugs that cause contractions in your cat to help eliminate the remaining tissue. This will be conducted in your veterinarian’s office and will prevent your cat from becoming infected as the fetuses continue to break down inside of the uterus. 

In the case of infection, your vet may choose to prescribe a broad spectrum antibiotic pending identification of the exact bacteria causing the infection. If a cold is minor, they may recommend conservative treatment with rest and fluids. With parasites, your vet will prescribe an appropriate parasite therapy. These are typically administered orally in the form of a paste, gel, or tablet.

If the underlying cause is injury, your vet may prescribe pain medication or anti-inflammatory medication to help your cat recover more quickly.

Finally, in some instances, your veterinarian may recommend spaying your cat to prevent future pregnancies. This is especially true if the miscarriage was caused by congenital defects, by hormonal abnormalities that cannot be easily corrected in future pregnancies, or after multiple miscarriages.

arrow-up-icon

Top

Worried about the cost of Miscarriage treatment?

Pet Insurance covers the cost of many common pet health conditions. Prepare for the unexpected by getting a quote from top pet insurance providers.

Recovery of Miscarriage in Cats

In most cases, your cat will recover well from a miscarriage as long as she receives proper treatment for the underlying condition. It will be important to administer all of the prescribed medications in the appropriate doses, especially in the case of infection. 

Some cats may need additional support if they seem depressed or lethargic or are pacing and acting agitated. In these cases it may be appropriate to isolate your cat in a quiet, warm and comforting space until the hormones triggered by the miscarriage and labor subside.

Overall, the prognosis for recovery from miscarriage in your cat is good and she should go on to live a long and healthy life.

arrow-up-icon

Top

Miscarriage Average Cost

From 373 quotes ranging from $200 - $1,200

Average Cost

$800

arrow-up-icon

Top

Miscarriage Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

cat

dog-age-icon

Two Years

thumbs-up-icon

6 found helpful

thumbs-up-icon

6 found helpful

Has Symptoms

My cat has had 2 litters of kittens and I came home to a miscarriage on my floor. She's still bleeding and passing more but I don't know what to do for her at this time. There is no emergency vet near me.

Oct. 5, 2021

Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Linda S. MVB MRCVS

recommendation-ribbon

6 Recommendations

Your regular vet should have the details to their emergency cover. All vets must offer an emergency service. If you live remotely, the University hospital is likely your best option. This needs to be investigated ASAP to check for e.g. infection or anaemia. She likely needs fluids and antibiotics.

Oct. 5, 2021

Was this experience helpful?

dog-name-icon

dog-breed-icon

Cat

dog-age-icon

One Year

thumbs-up-icon

7 found helpful

thumbs-up-icon

7 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Pregnant

My cat is pregnant and she as a green clear discharge

Sept. 28, 2020

Owner

answer-icon

Dr. Michele K. DVM

recommendation-ribbon

7 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Depending on how far along she is, that discharge may be normal, or it could be a sign of infection. If she is still having the discharge, it would be a good idea to have her seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine her, see if there is anything wrong, and make sure that she is healthy to have the kittens.

Oct. 7, 2020

Was this experience helpful?

Miscarriage Average Cost

From 373 quotes ranging from $200 - $1,200

Average Cost

$800

Need pet insurance?
Need pet insurance?

Learn more in the Wag! app

Five starsFive starsFive starsFive starsFive stars

43k+ reviews

Install


© 2022 Wag Labs, Inc. All rights reserved.