Stomach and Intestinal Cancer Average Cost

From 352 quotes ranging from $3,000 - 10,000

Average Cost

$7,000

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What is Stomach and Intestinal Cancer?

Types of gastrointestinal cancers include adenocarcinoma, leiomyosarcoma, lymphoma, and mast cell tumors. Older cats have a predisposition for developing gastrointestinal cancers. Feline leukemia virus and immunodeficiency virus may also play a role in the development of gastrointestinal cancer.

Stomach and intestinal cancer is a rare type of feline cancer, accounting for less than one percent of all reported cancers in cats. Gastrointestinal cancers are most commonly found in the small intestine. Stomach and intestinal tumors can be benign, but are typically malignant and aggressive. Benignity and malignancy depend on the type of cancer.

Symptoms of Stomach and Intestinal Cancer in Cats

Cats suffering from stomach or intestinal cancer will almost always show changes in eating habits due to tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. Stomach and intestinal cancers are serious conditions that require early detection for the best prognosis. If your cat is exhibiting any of the following symptoms, seek immediate veterinary attention:

  • Changes in behavior
  • Lethargy
  • Loss of appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Blood present in vomit or feces
  • Weight loss
  • Depression
  • Difficulty defecating
  • Abdominal pain or swelling
  • Signs of abdominal infection
  • Masses in the abdomen
  • Pale gums or other signs of anemia

Types

Adenocarcinoma

Adenocarcinomas located in the digestive system usually affect the large and small intestines. This type of gastric cancer is extremely rare in cats and doesn’t usually affect the stomach. Adenocarcinomas grow rapidly, tend to be aggressive during metastasis, and may cause blockages in part of the intestines.

Leiomyosarcoma

This type of tumor can be benign or malignant and originates within the smooth muscle. Leiomyosarcoma can occur in any part of the body, but most commonly affects the gastrointestinal tract. Malignant leiomyosarcomas have a high metastatic rate and typically spread to the lymph nodes and liver.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a type of aggressive malignant cancer that originates from an uncontrolled growth of lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell that protects the cat from foreign bodies or substances that may cause disease. Lymphoma can affect any part of the body, but is most commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract. Lymphoma is the most common type of gastric cancer in cats.

Mast Cell Tumors

Mast cells, like lymphocytes, are a type of white blood cell. While mast cell tumors typically form on the skin, they may also affect the gastrointestinal tract. Bleeding ulcers may be symptomatic of mast cell tumors, and Siamese cats in particular have a predisposition to developing mast cell tumors.

Causes of Stomach and Intestinal Cancer in Cats

The cause of stomach and intestinal cancer in cats will depend on the type of cancer and where it originated. As with most types of cancer anywhere in the body, gastrointestinal cancers are caused when cells begin to grow at an uncontrolled rate. Lymphoma, in particular, may be caused by a previous bout of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) or the immunodeficiency virus. The link, however, is not fully understood by researchers.

Diagnosis of Stomach and Intestinal Cancer in Cats

The vet can make a tentative diagnosis based on presentation of symptoms and a physical examination. Be sure to inform the vet of the duration and extent of your cat’s symptoms, as well as any previous stomach or intestinal problems. An x-ray and a biopsy of the abdominal tissue will be required for a definitive diagnosis. The vet may also conduct other forms of standard testing to assess whether the cancer has spread. In some cases, the vet may perform a gastroscopy, which will require anesthetic.

Treatment of Stomach and Intestinal Cancer in Cats

Treatment will depend on the type and stage of the cancer. Surgery is required for most types of gastrointestinal cancers, apart from lymphoma. Gastrointestinal lymphoma may be partially treated through surgery, but will typically require chemotherapy to ensure the best prognosis possible. 

Before surgery, your vet will run some standard tests, including a blood chemistry profile, blood count, and urinalysis. They may also perform additional x-rays to ensure the cancer hasn’t spread to other organs. The surgery itself will usually involve the partial removal of the stomach and/or affected intestine. The veterinary surgeon will then reconnect the stomach to the intestine. Since radiation therapy can harm nearby organs, this is not usually recommended for most cases of gastrointestinal cancer.

Recovery of Stomach and Intestinal Cancer in Cats

Your cat will typically be hospitalized for two days following surgery, and will receive intravenous fluid therapy during this recovery period. Your vet may prescribe anti-vomiting and pain management medication, as well as antacids to prevent stomach ulcers. 

On the return home, ensure that your cat has a warm, secure place to rest. You’ll need to limit activity for up to three weeks to allow for adequate recovery, and don’t allow the cat to irritate the surgery site. If you notice any bleeding, swelling, or irritation of the surgery site, contact your vet immediately.

If your cat requires chemotherapy – which will be recommended for most malignant tumors – the vet will schedule follow-up appointments to administer chemotherapeutic drugs via injection. These treatments will begin two weeks after surgery and will occur once every two to three weeks for up to five sessions.

Prognosis will depend on the aggressiveness and stage of the cancer at the time of operation, as well as the success of the operation itself. Surgery may be completely curative for benign tumors. Malignant gastrointestinal cancers tend to have a poorer prognosis and a higher recurrence rate.

Stomach and Intestinal Cancer Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Samantha
Domestic long hair
19 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Thickening of abdomen

Medication Used

Condrouton and glucosamine

Our 19 year old part Persian lady has a thinking lining in her abdomen and a quarter size mass our vet told us today. We believe it is cancer and surgery at this point is not good. She still eats and drinks just fine and moves slower because of arthritis in her hips. We are getting supplement for her hip pain to add to her food. I have researched and it says cats with the condition my old girl has, usually have a few months left. We are making her as comfortable as we can while she is doing fine

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Jasper
Ragdoll point
5 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Mass In Abdomen

My Ragdoll has lost weight weighed 4.5kg now 3.6kg. He has had blood tests which have come back normal, normal white blood cell count too.
The vet said he could feel a gritty mass in my cats tummy that was not moving they did an ultra sound and tried to get cells but unfortunately couldn’t get enough for an answer. He also said thickening of the abdormanal wall was present. He now says he needs to an operation to see the mass as by doing this he can tell if the cancer is malignant or benign I am so destrought I don’t know what to do is there a chance it could be benign?? The vet said he also probably isn’t in pain.

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Kahlo
short hair
5 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Weakness
Muscle Loss
Vomitting

Medication Used

Prednisolone

I rescued a cat from an owner that no longer wanted her. I don't know the background of the cat, but the previous owner mentioned that she barely had time for the cat and wanted to put her down. Kahlo, my cat, is 5 years old. She formally was raised with a Boxer, has been spayed, declawed, and is a full-time indoor cat. When I got her, she looked malnourished, skin and bones. The first day I had her she vomited twice. The second day, 3 times. On the 3rd day I took her to the vet. They ran a few tests and mentioned that everything looked fine other than her white blood cell count was high, potassium low, and had anemia. 2 weeks later, after being prescribed potassium, prescription food, and cerenia, she began vomiting again. I took her to run a GI panel and blood panel once again. They said she is negative feline leukemia which was a concern I had, that her potassium and anemia had returned a little more to normal, but that her white blood cell count remained high. They have now prescribed her prednisolone and prescription food. Kahlo hardly eats (she seems more keen when people food is around) and will only nibble every once in a while. In this whole month she has lost 3 pounds, she began at 7 (american shorthair domestic, seems pretty low to me) and now is at 4.3 pounds. She has hardly any muscle on her body. They want to see whether with this new prescription food if she will gain a little weight (considering that she hardly likes to eat cat food at all) but predict that if she keeps losing weight it is cancer. Now, I want Kahlo to have to best life, but I'm stuck because I don't have thousands more to spend on her (I've already spent 3K on just running tests and prescriptions) and her insurance won't cover anything since it is preexisting. They advised to do an ultrasound, but I decided against it. Since if Kahlo truly doesn't have long, I don't want her to spend the rest of her days being poked and prodded and sick with medications. Any advice? I'm lost. This is my first cat ever, and she seems very sick.

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Tybee
MaineCoon
6 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Weight Loss, Vomiting

Tybee, My 6 year old Male MaineCoon was just diagnosed with Stomach Cancer. He was 23 lbs and is now 17.3 lbs. He started vomiting 2/3 weeks ago. Our vet ran bloodwork which all came back normal. We had an ultrasound which indicated a focal mass present in the body of the stomach measuring 2.3x3.3cm and the mass is obliterating the layering to
the level of the serosa.
Multiple gastric lymph nodes are enlarged, hypoechoic and rounded in shape with mildly hyperechoic surrounding fat.
My vet said he has weeks or months to live. I am just broken inside. He is on Metronidazole and Cerenia and he just prescribed Onsior for pain.
I just want to be sure this sounds like the best homecare for his comfort and rest of his quality of life. I love him so much and just feel cheated to lose him at such a young age. I want to do everything possible to make him comfortable.

Get to a specialist. Animal Medical Center NYC

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Mickey
Domestic Short hair-tuxedo cat
12 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Vomiting, weight loss, lethargi
Vomiting, weight loss
Vomiting

Medication Used

cerenia

Our 12 year old male cat Mickey has been throwing up multiple times a day. This has been going on for quite a few months, and getting worse over the past few weeks. He had an exam and senior bloodwork about 3 months ago and was fine, weighing 17 lbs. Until today, no real diagnosis for his frequent vomiting. We’ve been giving him Pepcid AC and sometimes Cerenia on the advice of our Vet. Today, I took Mickey to the ER, because he threw up a lot, and I thought that I saw tinges of blood in the vomit. He’s lost 2 lbs. in 3 months.

They examined him and did an abdominal ultrasound and found 2 areas of dark mass in between the layers of tissue in his stomach. One along the top, and the other towards the bottom where the stomach and small intestine meet. They took a biopsy and sent it to the lab. We’re hoping to get results by the end of the week, but the prognosis isn’t looking good. My heart is breaking. We adopted Mickey when he was a kitten and have seen him through knee surgery, chronic ear infections, and a primary benign lung tumor. At this point, is palliative care our best option? I hate to put him through major surgery or radiation. We live in New England.

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Sparky
tabby
14 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea

Medication Used

Probiotics

We have a 14 yr. old male neutered cat. 7 months ago he was perfectly healthy, at 13 lbs. now he weights 6 lbs. We have run test on him and all blood work came back normal, except a couple spots in his feces sample. Was put on antibiotics and probiotics. Severe case of diarrhea, horrible smell. We have changed his diet to prescription hill I/d. Is this a sign of cancer?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3319 Recommendations
Foul smelling diarrhoea is normally associated with parasites like Giardia, however other conditions may also cause severe diarrhoea too including dietary intolerance among other causes; foul smelling diarrhoea isn’t an indicator for gastrointestinal cancer but together with other symptoms may be suggestive, however you should return to your Veterinarian for a follow up examination if there is no improvement. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bhuri
Feral
2 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Watery eyes

Hi, my cat has been pregnant, and she gave birth to one kitten, but even after that she looked pregnant, she is caring for her baby, like she should, she eats properly, but she meows a lot, have been sneezing unusually a lot, and seems like she is pregnant, but masses inside haven't been moving, and seems like something's swollen. I touched it and pressed, it doesn't disturbs her. Her eyes have been watering lately too. She breaths very rapidly in evenings, I thought that is because it's hot. Please help. She's stray, adopted.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1610 Recommendations
Bhuri may need to have an x-ray to determine whether she has more kittens. if she is doing well, eating and drinking, she may be fine to monitor, but if she starts to become lethargic, stops eataing, or isn't doign well, it would be best to have her seen.

But she is meowing a lot, sneezing,too. she has bad breath, in her belly it feels like a bulge, swollen, more rather than a kitten because it never moves, and when you touch her stomach, you can feel sort of grumbling noises..

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Tucker
Siemese
5 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight gain
Mass In Abdomen

Hello, my cat is 5 years old next month. He is a male. Lately he’s put on a lot of weight (we got a new kitten and he gets into the kitten food). Then today I noticed he has these mass type things in his fat pouch. He doesn’t like his belly touch so it was hard to tell if they hurt him or if he was just annoyed with me but when I was trying to feel them he was not having it.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3319 Recommendations
Any new lump or bump should be checked by your Veterinarian, I cannot say whether or not this is something to be concerned about or not without examining Tucker myself; keep an eye on the size and pop into your Veterinarian for a check to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Peaches
Ginger domestic
5 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

not drinking
Fatigue
Loss of Appetite

Mass swelling in pets abdominal area and loss of appetite.. she isn't drinking and very fetigued. . She went out for 12 hours in the garden and never came in for food or water and just stayed asleep in her spot in the garden

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3319 Recommendations
Without examining Peaches I cannot say what the specific cause is, but if you’re feeling an abdominal mass you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination to be on the safe side. There are many different types and origins for abdominal masses, so it is impossible to narrow down the cause and many of them may lead to lethargy, loss of appetite and other symptoms. Visit your Veterinarian as soon as possible for an examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Moorka
Russian Blue
15 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Poor Appetite
Nausea
Tired
Vomiting blood
Weight Loss
Vomiting

Hello, I went in to see a vet today and she did an ultrasound which showed that my cats stomach is not the normal shape of a stomach and that it has thick lining of growth around it, which she says to be cancer. She said that her other organs look good. My cat also has hyperthyroidism. She’s 15. I took her in because she vomited blood (she’s been vomiting nearly daily since she was a kitten but never blood) and also she’s been eating less. She was wobbly and sick looking. The doctor said that euthanasia is the best option for her. But I don’t want to do that. Is it possible that the cancer is benign? Is it possible that she can still live, with a lot of help from her human family? She’s grooming herself. She purrs. She plays with a laser. She sleeps with her mouse. I don’t see how having 3 rough days means that she needs to be put down.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3319 Recommendations
Without examining Moorka it is difficult to weigh in on a sensitive subject like this; when it comes to cancer or suspected cancer we cannot say whether it is malignant or benign without a biopsy. However, even benign stomach tumours may cause an obstruction or other issue which in this case would lead to her being put down. If you are looking for a second opinion, you should visit another Veterinarian in your area for a hands on examination and see if the same prognosis is suggested. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Tank
T
13 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss

Arquat recently had eight teeth extracted. After that for the weeks to come he had lost weight 4 pounds within a five week. He has recently been diagnosed with intestinal cancer where his stomach is filling up with fluids. Can this I’ve been caused by the surgery of the extraction of teeth?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1610 Recommendations
I'm very sorry that that is happening to Tank. His intestinal cancer would not have been related to his tooth extraction, no. It seems just very bad timing, and luck. I hope that you are able to keep him comfortable for a while longer.

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Sophie
Cat
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargy loss of appetite weight
Lethargy loss of appetite weight loss

Medication Used

Furosemide

Hello I have a 10 year old female cat veterinarian did blood work and said it was lymphoma. Her abdomen is distended. She is only drinking a little beef broth.She is not responding to furosemide. What options do I really have for her ?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1610 Recommendations
From your description, the only real option that is kind for her would be to let her go, humanely, in my opinion. She does not sound like she is having any quality of life, and it is important to make sure that she isn't suffering. I'm very sorry that is happening to your Sophie.

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Roxy
house cat
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Loud meows, passing gas
Loud meows

Our cat has had a rough year, we had a baby, we moved to new area and she was bullied by other cats. She now has her own place where the cats cant get to her because she was defacating in the house.... but now 6 months on she still gives this unusually random loud meows that seems to sound like she is in pain...sometimes she passes gas when she meows. Some days no meow other days every 4 minutes she moews like that. She is 10 years old and sterilised. She eats and is her usual self...sometimes vomiting but no blood in it or in her feces.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
3319 Recommendations
Gas and gastrointestinal upset may be due to stress from moving home and all the other related stress, without examining Roxy I cannot give her a clean bill of health; since this is a chronic issue you should check with your Veterinarian and have a thorough examination performed as Roxy may be in pain. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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