Surgical Tumor Removal in Cats

Surgical Tumor Removal in Cats in Cats - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention
Surgical Tumor Removal in Cats in Cats - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention
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What is Surgical Tumor Removal?

Surgical tumor removal in cats is the removal of a growth of cells from the cat’s body. A tumor is an accumulation of cells that have begun rapidly dividing in a localized area for unknown reasons. The tumor can be either benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), but the veterinarian may choose to have the mass removed even if the tumor does not possess a cancerous nature. The veterinarian may remove the tumor in the hospital or clinic, or refer the cat to a veterinary surgeon specialist. 

Surgical Tumor Removal Procedure in Cats

  1. The feline will be administered an injectable sedative before going into the pre-surgical area. 
  2. Once the feline is sedated, a member of the veterinary staff will take the feline to the pre-operative area to have an esophageal tube placed. An esophageal tube will be placed to allow oxygen and gas anesthetic to be delivered to the feline. 
  3. The feline will be taken to the surgical area where she/he will be placed on the surgical table and restrained (as even anesthetized patients can move when they are in a state of “sleeping”).
  4. The feline’s fur will be shaved over the affected area and scrubbed with an antimicrobial solution. 
  5. The feline will be hooked up to oxygen, followed by a gas anesthetic to allow her to relax and rest comfortably without pain during the surgical procedure. 
  6. The area around the tumor will be draped with surgical cloth and the tumor removal will begin. 
  7. The veterinary surgeon will use a scalpel blade to remove the tumor and possible the surrounding tissue depending on the feline’s surgical plan. 
  8. Once the tumor has been removed, it will likely be prepared for a biopsy to further diagnose the nature of the growth. 
  9. The open area of the cat’s skin will be cleaned and the veterinarian will place sutures as needed internally, followed by skin closure. 
  10. The feline will be removed from gas anesthetic and gas anesthetic as soon as the anesthetist is positive the cat’s vital signs (heart rate, breathing rate, temperature) are normal. 
  11. The esophageal tube will be removed and the feline will be allowed to recover in a quiet area. 
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Efficacy of Surgical Tumor Removal in Cats

The efficacy of surgical tumor removal depends on the individual cat and the nature of the tumor. In general, removing any tumor (cancerous or non-cancerous) will prevent the surrounding tissues and organs from being affected, resulting in secondary health issues. If the feline’s tumor is cancerous, removing the tumor will ideally remove the cancer and prevent the cancer from spreading. Ask your veterinarian about the efficacy of surgically removing your cat’s tumor and the probability of a positive outcome. 

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Surgical Tumor Removal Recovery in Cats

Surgical tumor removal in cats may require a period of hospitalization after the surgery. During this time, the veterinary staff will monitor the feline and administer pain management medications paired with antibiotics to prevent infection. Once the feline is allowed to return home, her/his physical activities will be restricted and an Elizabethan collar will likely be worn to prevent the feline from ripping out the stitches. Prescribed medications will continue at home as directed by the veterinarian. 

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Cost of Surgical Tumor Removal in Cats

The estimated cost of a surgical tumor removal in cats will include the pre-surgical biopsies that were taken to establish the nature of the tumor, which will cost a cat owner around $50. The size of the tumor will also be taken into consideration, as larger tumors will cost more to have removed than small tumors. A small tumor that is no greater than one inch in diameter will cost approximately $125, whereas a medium sized tumor of one to three inches could cost about $325. A large tumor may cost $525 or more to have removed and an extra large tumor, greater than five inches will cost $725 or more depending on the surgical procedure. 

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Cat Surgical Tumor Removal Considerations

Your cat will need to be placed under anesthetic for the duration of the surgical removal of the tumor, as well as, any biopsy procedures that were completed prior to the surgery date. The removal of a tumor will completely remove the fast-growing, potentially cancerous tumor from the feline’s body, however, recurrence is possible. It is important to discuss the outcome of the surgical tumor removal in your cat with the veterinarian. 

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Surgical Tumor Removal Prevention in Cats

As scholars are still researching how cancer is developing he feline body and why it affecting so many of our pets today, the information available believed to prevent a tumor from growing is not always effective. Most veterinarians recommend a healthy, balanced diet and daily exercise to prevent the chances of feline tumor development. However, even the healthiest of felines can be affected by tumors despite the active work of the pet owner. 

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Surgical Tumor Removal Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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tux cat

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Seven Years

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6 found helpful

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6 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Seizures

he had his first seizure yesterday we got medicine but he still twitches. I just want to know how much it would be to remove it?

July 30, 2020

Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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6 Recommendations

Thank you for your question. Unfortunately, without knowing what kind of tumor your cat has, where it is or anything more about him, it isn't possible for me to let you know whether surgery is possible, or what it will cost. It would be best to have your cat seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine him and see what is going on. They will be able to give you a better idea as to options once they have seen him. I hope that he is okay.

July 30, 2020

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Socrates

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moggy

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16 Years

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1 found helpful

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1 found helpful

Has Symptoms

Swollen Toe

My cat is 16 years old, he has a lump in his toe which is causing him pain, and he often avoids putting weight on it, and licks it constantly. The vet at first believed it was a nail bed infection, and when the antibiotic he prescribed did nothing, he said that it was likely a metastasised tumour, with the primary source coming from the lungs. He has the start of kidney failure (according to blood tests we had not long ago.) I would like to know if the risks of putting him under antibiotics are increased because of his age and kidney problems? Furthermore shows no signs of lung disorders (rapid breathing or difficulty etc.) What are the chances that the signs of lung cancer will show up on an xray or MRI/ CT scan? And if i did opt to amputate the toe (if the lungs aren't the primary source, and it is just a tumour on his toe), would the area likely have difficulty in healing after the removal if it has metastasised, or would the wound break down? How often is that the case? (Our vet said regularly, but i'm unsure if this is actually the case.) And if i chose for him to keep the toe, how long would it take for the Metacam to cause his kidneys to shut down? Or for an infection to occur in the toe area?

Sept. 19, 2018

Socrates' Owner

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