Fluid in the Chest Average Cost

From 9 quotes ranging from $1,200 - 6,000

Average Cost

$4,000

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What is Fluid in the Chest?

Many problems with respiratory function can result from fluid buildup in your dog’s chest. Examples of complications can include lack of room for lungs to expand, which causes restricted breathing, or lung collapse. On occasion, pleural effusion is found at a regular check up. Most often the issue is diagnosed at a time of respiratory distress. If you start to notice laboured breathing in your dog, or if your dog is having trouble keeping up his normal activity level, a veterinary visit is advised without delay.

Fluid in the chest in dogs is known in veterinary terms as pleural effusion. It's expected that there is a normal amount of fluid in the pleural space; but if there is a problem with drainage or an excess of production, the accumulation of fluid can cause a crisis situation for your pet.

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Symptoms of Fluid in the Chest in Dogs

Fluid in the chest is a somewhat common reason for abnormal respiratory function in dogs. Often resulting from an underlying condition, pleural effusion can exhibit the following symptoms:

Early pleural effusion meaning only a small amount of fluid has begun to accumulate:
  • Showing a low tolerance to activity and exercise
  • Lethargy and lower energy level than usual
Increasing pleural effusion as respiratory affliction is proliferating:
  • Rapid breathing (tachypnea)
  • Difficulty breathing (dyspnea)
  • Extension of neck as if trying to reach air
  • Sitting or lying in an unusual position in an attempt to ease breathing
  • Blue or pale gums, lips, or tongue (cyanosis) due to lack of oxygen in the blood
  • Low body temperature (hypothermia
  • Shock
Depending on the underlying cause of the fluid accumulation, you may see fever, weight loss, mental dullness, depression, a pale nose, or other symptoms that accompany the disorder.
Types
The types of fluid in the chest in dogs are classified in the following ways:
  • Hydrothorax - (noninflammatory transudate) due to increased hydrostatic pressure, brought on by an elevated cell and protein content or decreased oncotic pressure, brought on by low albumin in the blood.
  • Chylothorax - milky lymphatic fluid and chylomicrons containing a high concentrate of triglycerides accumulate.
  • Hemothorax - blood accumulates in the pleural cavity.
  • Pyothorax - accumulation of fluid due to an infection or growth.

Causes of Fluid in the Chest in Dogs

Fluid in the chest in dogs is a relatively common complication. There are a plethora of reasons that can be attributed to the accumulation of fluids; some of which are listed below:

  • Hydrothorax - liver disease, malnutrition, malabsorption, right-sided heart failure, burns, chronic hemorrhaging, protein-losing nephropathy (kidney disease), protein-losing enteropathy (intestinal disease).
  • Chylothorax - cancer, chronic vomiting, diaphragmatic hernia, twisted lung lobe, blood clot in chest veins, congenital defects.
  • Hemothorax - trauma, lymphoma, pulmonary and chest wall tumors.
  • Pyothorax - penetrating wounds, fungal or parasitic infection, pancreatitis, pulmonary thromboembolism, heartworm, pneumonia, esophageal disease, complications from an underlying condition such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.

Diagnosis of Fluid in the Chest in Dogs

The veterinarian will begin the process of diagnosis after requesting a brief history from you in regards to your pet’s recent behavior and apparent health. Be sure to be as accurate and complete as possible in relaying information to the veterinarian. There are many diagnostic procedures used to identify this condition, and any information you can initially provide is extremely helpful.

Chances are, the veterinarian will hear muffling sounds in the lungs through the use of a stethoscope. Palpitation of the abdomen may show pain is present. She may then decide to perform additional tests in order to pinpoint the cause of the problem.

A chest x-ray can reveal an accumulation of fluid in the thoracic cavity, and may show possible lung collapse. Fluid may be obtained from the chest with the use of a needle, which is necessary when proceeding to identify the type of fluid in the chest. An ultrasound of the chest, and often including the abdomen, will be done to show the condition of the lungs and other organs. An ultrasound is also helpful when determining where the needle should be placed for removal of fluid.

A complete blood count, chemistry profile, and fungal titers test may be done, as well as a heartworm test. Results may show abnormalities in glucose, albumin or liver enzyme levels, for example. Urinalysis may show proteinuria. A coagulation profile may be done as well. Information from all of the completed tests will be used to determine the type and cause of the fluid buildup.

Treatment of Fluid in the Chest in Dogs

In order to resolve the issue of fluid in the chest, the cause, whether it be sudden or due to an underlying disease, must be determined. As an example, cancer will be additionally treated with chemotherapy and radiation after the fluid in the chest has been treated. Another example would be the need to treat and eliminate an infection through the use of antibiotics.

To start treatment for pleural effusion, the veterinarian will provide oxygen therapy in order to make your dog more comfortable. The chest will be drained by the insertion of a needle, along with suction through the placement of a chest drain. This may need to be in place for a few days.

Intravenous fluids may be required if your pet is dehydrated. At times, a surgical exploratory thoracotomy may be necessary to investigate the cause of the fluid buildup. A thoracotomy may be necessary for draining, or to perform a correctional procedure. Radiographs will be part of the treatment because it will be important to monitor how the chosen therapy is working.

Recovery of Fluid in the Chest in Dogs

The prognosis of recovery will range from good to poor, depending on the cause and whether a serious underlying disease is found. If surgery was part of the treatment, your dog might remain in the hospital for 3 to 5 days, and the chest tube will need to remain in place until the fluid accumulation problem is under control.

When released from the hospital, your pet may require additional pain medication and/or antibiotics. Follow up appointments are an important part of the treatment for pleural effusion; radiographs and ultrasounds are often repeated to ensure that recovery is continuing.

The veterinarian will recommend any dietary changes required(such as a low fat, low sodium diet), and will advise you on exercise restrictions and how long leash only outings are mandatory.

Fluid in the Chest Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Raven
Pitt bull
7 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Cold nose, pail gums, heavy breath,

My dog Raven had fluid in the socket surrounding her heart. If she would have surgery will she maintain a normal life will she have complications is it wise to put her thru surgery and pain or let her Rest In Peace

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations
The question isn’t whether the surgery itself is going to help Raven, but the underlying cause of the pericardial effusion (fluid) needs to be managed as well. This surgery is somewhat routine and may involve a pericardial window (link to our page on the subject is below) where a portion of the pericardium is removed so that the fluid doesn’t cause constriction of the heart. The decision to go ahead with the surgery is yours and each case is different so I cannot comment on Raven’s suitability as I haven’t examined her. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/treatment/pericardial-window

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Gidget
Labrador Retriever
10 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

My 10 year old lab was taken to ER and had moderate pleural effusion on the right side on 9/28. They removed 1.2L, analyzed the fluid which was non-infectious and non-cancerous. Blood work was normal, x-rays normal, organ function and enzymes normal, oxygen absorption normal. She was taken back on 10/12 with severe bilateral effusion and 1.8L of fluid was removed. Again, all tests were normal. Abdominal ultrasound performed on 10/18 and no masses or anything were seen. Some fluid has accumulated again, but not enough to tap that day. Vets are stumped and have no idea as to cause, we are frustrated and don't know what to do next. Repeated tapping is going to be hard on her (and us financially) but she is perfectly healthy aside from the recurring pleural effusion. Don't know what to do next.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations
Your Veterinarian would have ruled out the usual causes of pleural effusion which include infection, cancer, hypoproteinemia, chyle, heart failure etc… There are some cases of idiopathic pleural effusion which is normally eosinophilic and may respond to diuretics and low dose corticosteroids; I really do not know what else to suggest. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bubba
Rat Terrier
15 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Done

Medication Used

Done

Can blood test help diagnoses for fluid in dogs lungs. We took our 15 year old Rat Terrier to vet four weeks ago because of breathing difficulties otherwise in good health other then large cyst on side. Dr. took x-rays, large amount of fluid in chest cavity pushing on thorax. Dr. prescribed 20mg of furosemide once a day. Tumor or heart disease suggested as possible underlying cause. Return visit two weeks our dog has lost 10% of body weight. Fluid somewhat reduced Dr. doubled furosemide and added 5mg Enalapril once a day. Suggested steroids. Our dog's breathing somewhat inproved still has difficulty keeping food down. Is removing fluid mechanically something that should be considered.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations
If the fluid is in the chest cavity, it may be drained mechanically but this isn’t dealing with the underlying cause and the fluid would return; if the fluid is in the lungs themselves then draining the lungs wouldn’t be an option. Furosemide is a common diuretic and may be used in conjunction with another diuretic; the underlying cause of the fluid would need to be determined. Fluid accumulation may be due to heart failure, low blood protein (would show on blood test), head trauma among other disorders; further testing to uncover a diagnosis would help direct treatment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Poochie
Toy Poodle
10 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Panting/Abnoraml Breathing
Coughing
Over heating
Fainting
Murmur

My 10 year old toy poodle has swelling a little bit above his stomach that I just noticed today. I was also told he had a murmur that's severe. He recently has been fainting even when he is not outside. He also has been short of breath and been lagging around. What do I do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

A swelling may be caused by a variety of different causes and without examining Poochie I cannot really say what the cause is; if Poochie is fainting often it may be due to a lack of blood to the brain due to poor cardiac output, medication may help with the heart’s contractility. For both cases a visit to your Veterinarian is required to examine the swelling and to have a cardiac examination. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Kailey
Labrador Retriever
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Cough

Kailey is a 12 year old Lab retriever with an intermittent hacking cough with retching for over a year - gradually worsening. Found to have pulmonary infiltrates in CXR. Did not want to spend $5000 in CT scan & bronchoscope so just have been monitoring. She's otherwise been fine until today when she vomited & has been lethargic all day. Breathing harder too. Trip to emergency vet & now, in addition to infiltrates, she has bilateral effusions. Vet is tapping her but is this the beginning of the end? Would steroids help her? Docs think it's cancer but no biopsy done.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

Regular tapping is a common first step solution; but for a more indepth answer the underlying cause needs to be determined, once the underlying cause is known treatment options may start to be explored. It may be worth having the fluid that is removed analysed to see if anything in the fluid indicates a possible cause (including cytology for cancer); I cannot give a prognosis (although not favourable if the underlying cause isn’t treated) or recommend treatment if the primary condition isn’t found as fluid accumulation is a symptom not a condition. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Aron
Golden Retriever
12 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Heavy Breathing
Vomiting
Cold mouth
Not eating food

My 12 year old golden retriever has fluid around his heart he has problems breathing he can't eat he is vomiting and can't walk we brought him to the vet and his back legs were all cold they are taking him for a surgery to remove the fluid I'm very worried because we thought it's the end. Can you tell me is there chance he will be ok after this surgery will he live ? Thank you

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

I cannot give you the assurances that you are looking for as I haven’t examined Aron or know the underlying cause of his symptoms; there are different causes for fluid accumulation and in many cases there is no curative treatment and long term management is required. Your Veterinarian would be able to give you more information regarding Aron’s specific case as I haven’t seen Aron or examined him. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Samson
Great Dane
Under a year
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Non active
Chest big on one side
Mouth breathing
Laying down in abnormal position
Hard to breath

My dog Samson has not been himself for about two days now. The first day he acted a little weird. He would lay down most of the day and he is usually an active dog. The second day he didn't move at all and laid around all day long literally. I checked him out today and his chest is really big on one side. I think that he might have fluid in his chest area. I'm not for sure though. Please help me!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

Without examining Samson and performing auscultation and percussion; I cannot say what the cause is, it would be best if Samson is having breathing difficulties to visit your Veterinarian as soon as possible to determine the cause and to start immediate treatment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Hobbes
Labrador
9 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

fluid in chest
Fluid In Abdomen
Loss of Appetite

Hi Doc, we have a 9 year old Labrador. He has a lump in his testicles. In the last 6 months, he has had 2 bouts of sickness where he stops eating entirely and has no energy. But no other symptoms like fever, loose motions. Last time in Feb, the ECG, blood, echo, x-ray all had come clear so we were really stumped as to the cause of the sickness. This time around, similarly he stopped eating one fine morning and lost all energy. Initially he was having trouble passing stool, however, after one shot of anti biotics, stool is under control but still no appetite. Unfortunately this time X Ray has shown minor fluid in the chest and the abdomen.We are in the process of doing the ECG and Echo and the Tap fluid test. What should be our way forward:
a) Surgically remove the lump ASAP if the fluid tests positive for cancer. Blood reports show liver and kidneys to be in order as well as protein levels.
b) is there a chance of the cancer being more aggressive post the surgery for any reason whatsoever.
c) is there a chance of this not being cancer

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

I feel that regardless of test results, the testicles should be removed; if there is testicular cancer, castration would help, however if the cancer has spread the prognosis isn’t as favourable; removing the testicles will allow histopathology to be performed on the mass giving a diagnosis of cancer, cyst or other mass; there is always a chance that cancer isn’t present, but with the other symptoms presenting there is a high likelihood that it is cancer. I would castrate him and check the mass in the testicles, drain the fluid from the chest and abdomen and check them for cells and protein etc… Based on the results, your Veterinarian may have a better idea of a diagnosis and how to direct treatment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ruby
Pug
4
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Low appetite
Lethargic

Medication Used

Prednisone
Cerenia tablets

My 4 year old female Pug has been diagnosed with lymphoma. She has had 2 treatments of chemo in 11 days and chest tap once. We are not going thru with the 19 week treatment chemo program but would like to consider every 3-4 weeks. Will fluid continue to build in her chest?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

The buildup of fluid in the lungs most probably will continue during the course of the condition; medical management may not be effective which would lead to a physical drainage needing to be performed on a regular basis. Each case is different and I cannot comment on Ruby’s case as I haven’t examined her and I’m unaware of the extent of her lymphoma. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Saartje
Pekingese
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Fluid in thorax

Medication Used

Prednisone

Hello! A friend of mine has a small dog (pekingese) that has been suffering from fluid in its chest for over five years now. She is a vet herself and has tried pretty much everything to find the cause. A short description: 2011: ideopathic periocardic effusion (chest tap was performed and dog seemed to recover well). July 2016: thorax effusion with 300 ml of bloody fluids, spent 3 days in IC, had thorax drains. After treatment the dog did well without any issues for 3 months.

In November 2016, (mainly) the left side of the thorax suddenly filled up with fluid again, another chest tap was performed. No signs of infection, blood values all appeared normal. After the tap, the dog was again seemingly fine. She was put on prednisone, simply because there did not seem to be any cause and according to the specialist, no one knows whether it works.

In February 2017, another episode of effusion – a scan was done in a University of Veterinary Medicine – no cause was found. No signs of infections, tumors or any other underlying issues. Earlier this month the thorax was once again filled with fluid, and yet another chest tap was performed, after which the dog is once again active and happy.

In total, there have been 5 ultrasound scans performed, including one by the cardiologist at the University, no defects or abnormalties found – no infections in the blood, no tumor cells or infectious cells have ever been found in the fluid drained from the chest.

Have you ever had an experience like this with any animals, and if so, have you been able to determine a cause? Thank you very much in advance for any advice you could provide!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

Normally idiopathic pleural effusion would have eosinophils in the fluid that is drained; treatment would be over the course of a few months (up to six) with low doses of furosemide and eighteen months with prednisone (including tapering off of treatment). I haven’t come across this type of case which Specialists are puzzled by. The list of possible causes is long and includes liver disease, kidney disease, protein losing nephropathy, protein losing enteropathy, malabsorption disorders, trauma, cancer and autoimmune diseases. I am sorry I am unable to help Saartje. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Milo
Mixed
2 1/2 months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Trouble breathing, loss of appetite, balance

Puppy formed soft lump under his throat a few days ago it has gotten bigger every day, hes having a lot of trouble breathing and wheazing with every breath. He cant sleep, he forgits to breath, vomiting , and cant really eat. He has to keep his head up like he cant breath without it being up hes been to vet they give him a nausea pills drops for eyes and nose and a antibiotic but it hasnt rea)y helped and hes been laying in corners and cant keep his breathing regular. Hes been falling over and the lump has gotten bigger but its like fluid under his throat.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

It is possible that Milo has a salivary mucocele (see link below), has an abscess, enlarged lymph nodes (usually hard) or enlarged thyroid gland. One of the best ways to diagnose the lump would be to have a fine needle aspirate to see the type of cells or fluid present which would indicate its origin; also an ultrasound may be useful. When lumps or masses grow in the throat area they can cause problems with eating and breathing which is why a cause needs to be determined as soon as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.acvs.org/small-animal/salivary-mucocele

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Tito
Parson Russell Terrier
11 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Cough choking, swollen lymph nodes

Medication Used

Prednisone 20mg

Started out with reverse sneezing and progressed to choking. At check up found swollen lymph nodes in neck. Tested thyroid, ran bloodwork all normal. X-ray shows mass in chest cavity pushing outward up toward throat area. Aspirated and sent to lab, result were fat and salivitory enzymes..reaspirated 3 times and oxygenated blood was all they could get this time. In 3 days since the first aspiration, there was a reduction in the nodes in the neck on one side without medication. Started today 20 mg of prednisone to see if can reduce more. Mass is not on lungs or heart...no infection showing in tests. Mass is pressing upward on esophagus and trachea. Causing the cough and choking but it has eased somewhat in the last couple of days. Again before the prednisone was given. Any thoughts on what is going on? This has 2 very good vets stumped. No loss of appetite, no legarthy, no weight loss, still very active.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

This sounds like a difficult case; did either Veterinarian perform a fine needle aspirate of the lymph nodes? It would be interesting to know the types of cells present. One suspicion would be a thymic haemorrhage (which can cause dyspnoea, increased respiratory effort and lethargy) which may explain blood being drawn three days after the first aspiration and the presence of fat (thymus turns fatty with age) in the initial aspiration but doesn’t explain salivary enzymes or the swelling of the lymph nodes. I am stumped as well, an aspiration of the lymph nodes may give an indication of what is happening or ultrasound of the thoracic inlet (maybe tricky) which may give an indication of blood supply using Doppler and the structure of the mass (detail not picked up on x-rays). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Yes fine needle aspirations done on lymph nodes in his neck. I think surrounding glands as well. They did it again closer to the base of his neck where the chest starts. That's where they got the oxygenated blood. Nothing abnormal showed up in the cells this is what has them stumped. He does not show any signs of legarthy at all. And 3 days time since the first aspiration then swelling went down some in his neck. The mass doesn't seem to be attached to anything but in the lymph node in his chest cavity. Sonogram was mentioned as a scope will not really see anything. I asked about aspirating the main body of the mass in the chest cavity but he isn't recommending that because of where it is.

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Callie
Australian Shepherd
3 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Labored and difficult breathing
Shallow Rapid Breathing

My dog was recently taken to an emergency vet due to her breathing being shallow and rapid. She also has some wheezing and rarely coughing. The vet took x-rays and said she had fluid in her chest so they removed some of the fluid. She told us the fluid was clear and acellular but did not give us any other answers. Could there be a very serious underlying cause if she shows no other symptoms? The doctor gave us no real answers and I hope to follow up with my normal vet as soon as possible

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

The cause of fluid in the chest needs to be investigated as the fluid is a symptom of another condition; causes include low blood protein (protein losing enteropathy, protein losing nephropathy), heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, cancer or low blood albumin. It would be best to have blood tests done to establish Callie’s overall internal health to see if there is any underlying condition. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Peppy
Dachshund
13 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

wheezing, gagging, weight loss, appetite loss

Hello,
My dachshund has a tumor on the right side of his neck. This has really started to affect his breathing and he is gasping for air. He is breathing very heavily and comes to a point of choking and makes a very loud gagging noise to clear his throat . The frequency of the gagging is higher at night and his heavy breathing does not allow him to sleep properly at night. There is also some phlegm discharge after his gagging. He has lost his appetite and a lot of weight and has trouble drinking,eating and swallowing. I just want him to give him some relief for his heavy breathing. I have taken him to 3 vet's in my home town but no medication seems to work or the diagnosis is not right. Is there anything I can give him or any therapy that will give him some relief from his wheezy breathing.He tends to sit in an upright position and can't lie to his side because of his breathing issues. I can share more info with you if you'de like. Please let me know how I can give him some relief. A big thank you in advance and bless you for the kind work you are doing.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

It sounds like the mass on Peppy’s neck is occluding her airway and causing irritation making her cough at all hours of the day as well as making swallowing difficult or painful. The cause of a mass in the neck may be due to enlarged lymph nodes, swollen salivary glands, infection, thyroid conditions, tumours, lipoma or abscesses. The most important task in a case of mass on the neck is identifying the type of mass and its origin; usually a fine needle aspirate or biopsy is taken to determine the contents of the mass and the type of cells present (cancerous or not), also an ultrasound would be useful in the diagnosis to determine the involvement of the mass with surrounding structures. Unfortunately, the treatment is dependent on the diagnosis, without getting the diagnosis we are unable to successfully treat the mass. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Would it be advisable to do a biopsy at this age? And is there any medication to ease the breathing?
TIA

The vet over here has detected it as a tumor

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Rue
Pitbull mix
5 Years
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargic
Possible leukemia
Possible lymphoma
Tumour under jaw

Is it worth a chest tap for a dog with possible leukemia or lymphoma. She deteriorated very quickly and I just want to spend a little more time with a happy girl. I don't want to make things worse

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

A chest tap in this case would just be removing fluid on a regular basis and would be treating (or rather managing) a symptom not a condition. Management of patients who are reaching the end of their life can be a difficult balance between what is best interest of the patient against what is in the interest of the owner (love can be blind); you need to look at Rue’s overall level of health and determine if she would want it to be prolonged. Your question isn’t easy to answer, I haven’t examined Rue but unless you can manage the fluid in the chest without a chest tap (opens the door for complications like pneumothorax, infections etc…) I wouldn’t recommend it. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bonnie
10
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Lethargy

My dog has cancer and we are having to draw fluid out of her lungs every 48 hours or she becomes very uncomfortable and struggles to breathe. This has been going on for about two weeks. After the chest taps, she's back to her old self and seems upbeat but she still uses her abdomen to suck in air....I'm just wondering what the humane way to go about this is. We're not going forward with chemo, she is on pain meds and antibiotics/anti-inflammatory, has about a month left to live...I struggle with the idea of putting her down right now because after the chest taps she seems fine, but they are becoming more frequent. How risky and/or invasive are these chest taps? Are these trips to the vet stressing her out?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

It is always a difficult decision whether to prolong your loved ones life or to kindly and respectfully have her put down. Thoracentesis (tapping fluid from the chest) may present complications such as pneumothorax, introducing infections or other complications. Quality of life can be difficult to measure as owners can put more emphasis on the good times and justify the bad times. I cannot make a recommendation for euthanasia as I haven’t examined Bonnie or seen any test results, but regular Thoracentesis procedures may place stress on a patient and have some complications but as the owner you need to discuss with your Veterinarian what is in Bonnie’s best interest. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Hikari
Dachshund
13 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Shallow Rapid Breathing

Chronic pleural effusion in 13 yo female dachshund. Tap done.x 3, 550, 375 350. She builds fluid in about 2 to 3 mos. all labs normal. Fluid cytology without malignant cells but with mesothelial cells., some WBC - culture done and negative. Has had course of doxycycline - no effect. On Meloxicam after that, fluid recurred within 2 .5 months. Wondering if low dose diuretic may help? Vet and I talked about possible steroid use.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

There are numerous causes of pleural effusion including trauma, infection, heart failure, low blood protein, cancer and heartworm (among others); the treatment program given to Hikari would depend on the underlying condition causing the pleural effusion. Diuretics are useful in some cases, especially when the cause is caused by heart failure, but is not useful in other cases. Again, steroid use would be down to the specific cause and would need to be considered in the same way diuretics would. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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charlie
Jack Russell Terrier
7 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea

Hi I have a 7 year old male jack russel who has had chronic water diarreha for approx 7 weeks. He now has a swollen stomach due to fluid in his stomach and has a pouch/lump of fluid on his chest. Blood results show that he has low protien of 12. He has been out on steriods and a poo sample is being done. In the meantime do you have any advise on how I can help him or what it could be please? Thanks

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1676 Recommendations

Chronic diarrohea, ascites (fluid in abdomen), thoracic fluid and low protein levels are indicative of protein losing enteropathy which may be caused by cancer, inflammation, diet or ulceration of the gastrointestinal tract. Treatment is varied according to the underlying cause; steroid treatment (prednisolone) is a common course of treatment especially in cases which are idiopathic (unknown cause). Dietary changes to a low fiber diet that contains digestible fat, simple carbohydrate and protein may help in some cases. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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