Hypoglycemia Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $500 - 8,000

Average Cost

$4,000

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What is Hypoglycemia?

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormal decrease of glucose concentration in the blood, or more simply - low blood sugar levels.  A normal blood glucose value for healthy, non-diabetic dogs is 3.3-6.1 mmol/L.  Hypoglycemia occurs when excessive glucose consumption depletes the reserves of glucose in the body.  Hypoglycemia can be a result of endocrine or hepatic disorders, a higher energy requirement for glucose, lack of glucose due to fasting, or toxicity.  Hypoglycemia will leave dogs feeling weak and groggy.  If left untreated, unconsciousness followed by death will result.

Hypoglycemia is defined as a low blood sugar concentration.  As sugar (in the form of glucose) is the primary energy source in the body, low blood sugar levels will ultimately affect organ and brain function.

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Symptoms of Hypoglycemia in Dogs

Symptoms of hypoglycemia will usually begin with low energy and a delayed response time, if left to progress further these symptoms will develop into more serious signs such as seizures and collapse.  Potential symptoms include:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Lethargy (low energy)
  • Slow response time
  • Unusual behaviour
  • Polyuria (increased urination)
  • Polydipsia (increased thirst)
  • Lack of coordination
  • Partial paralysis of hindquarters
  • Weakness
  • Exercise intolerance
  • Trembling
  • Involuntary twitching
  • Seizures
  • Unconsciousness

Causes of Hypoglycemia in Dogs

Hypoglycemia can be the result of underlying endocrine or hepatic disorders, sudden increase in the use of glucose by the body, inadequate amounts of glucose, or toxicity.  Causes include:

  •  Abnormal growth of pancreatic cells
  • Cancer in the liver or gastrointestinal system
  • Inflammation of the liver
  • Portosystemic shunt
  • Glycogen-storage disease
  • Excessive strenuous exercise
  • Overuse of glucose in the body during pregnancy
  • Reduced intake of glucose due to starvation or malnutrition
  • Delayed time between meals in kittens and puppies (especially toy breeds)
  • Overdosing of insulin
  • Toxicity from ingestion of artificial sweeteners

Diagnosis of Hypoglycemia in Dogs

When hypoglycemia is suspected on the basis of the above clinical signs and history, the veterinarian will first perform a complete physical exam.  This will be followed by a measurement of the current blood glucose value and potential ancillary tests to define the underlying causes of the condition. 

The initial blood glucose measurement is assessed using a glucometer (also called a glucose meter) and it is a quick easy test that only requires a small drop of blood from the patient.  This is beneficial for hypoglycaemic puppies and kittens as a large sample is not required. The result appears within a few seconds.  An ideal blood glucose value is 3.3-6.1 mmol/L, any reading that is lower than this indicates hypoglycaemia. 

Additional blood tests may be performed to evaluate organ function (specifically the kidney, liver, and pancreas), electrolyte imbalances, thyroid function, cortisol function, and other blood related conditions.  A urinalysis (urine test) may be performed to eliminate urinary infections or disease, as well as evaluate kidney function.

If the cause of hypoglycaemia is suspected to be related to cancer or tumour growth, then an ultrasound may be performed.

Treatment of Hypoglycemia in Dogs

Initial treatment is aimed at correcting the hypoglycemic crisis by way of raising the blood sugar levels.  Depending on the severity and symptoms, this may be initially managed by rubbing glucose or corn syrup on the gums (a treatment which can be started by the owner at home).  If more aggressive therapy is required, the dog will be placed on a intravenous fluid infusion containing concentrated dextrose. Blood glucose levels will be reassessed after the initial treatment.

Ongoing treatment will focus on management of the underlying cause of disease.  If the hypoglycaemia has occurred due to fasting or over exercise, the condition will be resolved after a period of rest.  Dogs will usually be monitored for several hours at the veterinary hospital and then sent home with preventative discharge instructions.

If hypoglycaemia occurred due to a cancer, tumour, or portosystemic shunt then surgery could be necessary.  Inflammatory or endocrine disorders may be treated with medical management.  Toxicity is usually managed with supportive treatment.  Defining and treating the underlying cause is essential or hypoglycaemia will reoccur.

Recovery of Hypoglycemia in Dogs

Once a patient is discharged after a hypoglycemic episode, it is important to continue home monitoring for signs of reoccurrence.  Dogs may be sent home with specific surgical discharge instructions or medications to treat the underlying conditions depending on what is performed in clinic.

For cases of strict hypoglycemia, special care should be taken in small breed puppies or kittens and highly active dogs to prevent reoccurrence.  For puppies and kittens, frequency of feeding should be increased to several small meals per day instead of one large meal.  For active dogs, it is advised to feed a moderate meal several hours before activity and to keep snacks readily available.  Care should also be taken to monitor dogs closely when there is a requirement for fasting, for example pre-operative periods.

Ultimately, prognosis and the expected time to a full recovery is dependent on the underlying conditions that have contributed to hypoglycemia.

 

Cost of Hypoglycemia in Dogs

Treatment cost will vary greatly depending on the underlying conditions responsible for the hypoglycemic episode.  For an initial consultation, blood glucose test, and treatment with glucose syrup, the cost will be approximately $80 - $200.  If an intravenous glucose infusion is required this can add an additional $100 - $300.  Treatment cost for underlying causes is based on whether surgical intervention or medical therapy is necessary, and will start from $800.  Ongoing treatment may be necessary and the total treatment cost can be between $1000 - $8000.

Hypoglycemia Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Rocky
Pomeranian
3 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Loss of Appetite

Hi, my pom does not want to eat. He smells his food and runs away. He also plays with his food but does not eat it. He is active and playful but pees a lot. I fear that it might be hypoglycemia. Any suggestions on what I can do would be of grat help.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
Without seeing Rocky, I'm not sure if he is just being a playful puppy, or if he may have something wrong with his mouth that is preventing him from eating. Since I can't see him, it would be a good idea to have your veterinarian look at him to make sure that nothing is going on with him that is causing a problem. I hope that all goes well for him!

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Cuchie
Maltese
16 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Disorientation

My 16 year old Maltese mix dogie had an episode about a little over a year ago and she was diagnosed as having had an 'old dog disease' episode. She has been fine since until about 3 weeks ago when all of a sudden she couldn't see, bumping into everything, was disoriented, not able to determine the direction of our voices, shaky on her legs, drinking large amounts of water and urinating a lot and all over the house. We took her to our vet who did a complete blood count, which came back normal. She then had a liver and kidney test, which was also normal. The vet then wanted to test for diabetes, which she did and it was determined that she was hypoglycemic. They asked us to giver her more complex carbs in her diet and I explained that she was a fussy eater and if I could introduce glucose or corn syrup as a supplement instead. She said that would be ok and that I could give her a teaspoon of honey or glucose once a day. Before I had a chance to put that into effect, today she threw up all her food whole and right after she dis that she had some sort of seizure that lasted about 10 to 15 seconds. We have been unsuccessful in getting hold of our vet and got some advice from the Internet and based on that we gave her a syringe of corn syrup diluted. She has since caught herself and seems ok now. But our question is are we on the right track and what should we do now? And also, should we continue giving her the glucose and if so for how long and how much?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
It does sound like Cuchie is having hypoglycemic episodes which may lead to seizures, rubbing honey on the gums in these situations can help and it seems that your Veterinarian is on the right track with a diagnosis. It is important to monitor Cuchie’s behaviour and movement as this can be an early indicator of low blood glucose and you can act quickly with some honey before to gets worse. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Max
Belgian Malinois
9 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weak legs
Exercise Intolerence
Frequent Urination
Trouble eating (szur. bites tongue)
Exercise Intolerence (50m tops)
Very Thirsty
Seizures
Convulsions

Max is a Malinois/Lab mix,100 lbs. He's been dealing with seizures for about 6+ months now. He's been to 2 different vets, both who weren't confident diagnosing anything conclusively without a follow up to a specialist. The first vet suggested a pancreatic tumor, the second just seemed to think that until further testing that the seizures might as well be considered idiopathic.
We're quite concerned, because there are so many illnesses out there that share several symptoms in common with Max's situation. We feed him 4-6 times a day now (2-3 small meals, 2-3 snacks), and we include a bit of karo syrup on most of these, just to make sure there is a constant influx of readily available glucose. This seems to help, though there have still been seizures that just don't correlate with any missed meals. He bit his tongue so badly he could barely eat mush for 10 days, so I have a pair of small nylabones on stand by to stick between his molars during the next seizure.
Anyway, we're concerned he may have something serious, like encephalitis, or tetanus, etc. We live in St. Louis, and I'm aware that we have our own brand of encephalitis here, and Max started showing symptoms in the fall. He does have a fenced yard, and there's a creek on the other side of the neighbor's house, so he could have easily been bitten by a tick or mosquito. Also, there is an Extremely emaciated dog next door, I literally can't believe it's alive. They do get up close through the fence sometimes, who knows what that thing is infected with.

So the next stop is the specialist, what kind of tests does Max need to really narrow this thing down? I'm just not convinced that chronically low blood sugar explains all this, he was always a super high energy dog and never had a big appetite. The only problem he ever had before was gastroenteritis as a puppy (for at least 6 months).


So far he's had basic blood work, which only showed low glucose, and an x-ray, which didn't show anything.
We declined the phenobarbitol for now, because we want to wait for a third opinion.

I forgot to add, he can barely walk around long enough to relieve himself, and then his legs all start collapsing. So we just get stuck for awhile while he lays there, and then it takes about a minute per meter to get him back inside. Sometimes we have to use a blanket as a stretcher. This still happens even if we just Gave him treats or food with karo syrup a half hour before. That's why I'm not sold on the hypoglycemic prognosis.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
The question isn’t if there is hypoglycemia (we know that), the most important question is what is causing it; a pancreatic tumour (insulinoma) would explain why blood glucose levels are low even after karo syrup has been given since a insulinoma continues to produce insulin regardless of blood glucose levels. Whilst x-rays are noted in the diagnosis of insulinoma, they are not reliable; ultrasound, CT scan or exploratory laparotomy with a biopsy are better diagnostic methods; check the links below for more information. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/condition/insulinoma www.acvs.org/small-animal/insulinoma

Max's owner is an ass

I can't believe this dog owner is so selfish to refer to the emaciated dog next door as 'that thing'. How can anyone be so concerned about their own dog, yet completely indifferent to the suffering of the neighbour's dog!

How can this owner beside talking about his dog condition be so heartless about the dog next door. Take action not only for your dog but the your neighbor dog. where's your compassion!!!

Thank you for your quick response, we will get these tests done as soon as we can, I just hope we haven't taken too long.

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Cj
Cocker Spaniel
13 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Weakness
Head Tilt
Vision Problems

My dog is diabetic and has been for about a year and a half. In the last couple weeks her blood sugar has dropped three times leaving her with lost vision weakness in the legs and head tilt. I have given her honey when it has happened which seems to stop the symptoms almost immediately. We are increasing her insulin slowly her doctor because her test came back that her blood work was too high. Anything else I should be concerned with? Is increasing her insulin the correct thing to do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
Management of diabetes is not really a science but an art more like a balancing act where you need to keep the blood glucose level within reference range using dietary changes, insulin and timing; if you are increasing the insulin levels, it may make hypoglycemic episodes more severe or more frequent. You should discuss with your Veterinarian and look into glucose curves to monitor blood glucose over a long period of time, especially with changes to the insulin dosage. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Shady
German shepherd mix
11 Months
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Unconscious, vomiting
Unconscious

Medication Used

Don't know what they're giving her

I have an 11 month old German Shepherd mix. Her name is Shady. It is now Sunday. Friday afternoon she was rushed to the veterinarian emergency room . On our arrival her blood glucose level was 49 it is now Sunday and it went from 49 to 59 on Saturday and today Sunday it was 22. They've had her two days and they cannot give me a reason for what what's going on. Hypoglycemia has not even come up as a possibility. They keep telling me she got into something that made her sick. There's nothing here that she could have gotten into. I have another dog in the yard with her and there's nothing wrong with him. So two days and over $2,000 we are still basically in the same place if not worse then what we were on Friday. I'm at my wits end. I'm running out of money and we still have no answers to what's going on. It seems strange to me that on Friday her level was at 49 and she was unconscious practically dead and when her level is at 22 she's walking around eating acting normal. I don't understand how this could happen. Unless these doctors are incompetent. Please help me with any information you could provide. First thing Monday morning she will be going to our regular vet. Whom is very competent. Thank you so much

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
Normal blood glucose levels are generally between 76-119mg/dL (may vary slightly between different machines and textbooks), a level below this would indicate a reduction in blood glucose in circulation which may be due to poisoning (xylitol in chewing gum or toothpaste for example), cancer (insulinoma for example), liver disease, hormonal conditions, physical exhaustion among other causes. Without examining Shady and reviewing all information I cannot say specifically what the underlying cause is since the different possible causes have different approaches to treatment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM http://veterinarycalendar.dvm360.com/logical-approach-diagnosis-and-management-hypoglycemia-proceedings

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Sadie
Border Collie
10 Months
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Ataxic
glazed look in her eye
Awake but unresponsive to stimulus
Quick breathing
Seizures

Our ten month old border collie pup has been learning the art of working stock. She’s fairly thin even though we feed her high energy dog food. She doesn’t keep the weight on well due to her constant playing, then working. Today we were out moving the stock and she was running pretty hard for about ten minutes. She was doing a wide sweep and we were beside her on the four wheeler when all of the sudden she just slowed down fell over and had a seizure. She seized for about a minute and a half. After that she was very ataxic. She was awake but fairly unresponsive to any stimulus. She then started breathing very quickly for about ten minutes. Before she was able to slow down and be more responsive. 3 to four hours later she is still slightly wobbly on her feet and has been sleeping. We have her some sugar water and she drank it. Tried feeding her and she didn’t eat. Wondering if hypoglycemia is your diagnosis. If so what do you recommend we do for her. Happened once before, same symptoms.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
Hypoglycemia is a possibility but I would recommend that you place some honey or syrup on the gums instead of sugar water; you should visit your Veterinarian for an examination and a blood test to be on the safe side before putting her to work. Also, other conditions like Border Collie collapse should be considered as well, you can find more information below. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.vetmed.umn.edu/research/labs/canine-genetics-lab/genetic-research/border-collie-collapse

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Lucy
Papillon
10 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Hypoglycemia

My 10 year old papillon had her spleen removed 2 weeks ago. 4 days after surgery, I thought she had a seizure, but it was low blood glucose. She was released from the emergency veterinary hospital. The next week her blood glucose was between 26 and 30 in the morning. She spent one night at the ER and went to my regular vet the next morning.

This lasted 5 days. On the 5th day her blood glucose was at 96. Tonight I took her in for a follow up appointment and to get her stitches removed. Her blood glucose had dropped to 61. She has been syringe fed every 6 hours since last Friday and is on a/d. Her red blood cell count has also dropped since last Friday.

Her liver levels are abnormal, but she is not in liver failure. She is on metronidazole, zeniquin, denosyl and tonight was started on entyce for 3 days. They aren’t sure if there is an infection and have run lots of blood panels on her.

She has had numerous ultrasounds and when her spleen was removed, the vet examined her organs and all looked normal, except the spleen.

Is there something we are missing or something more I could be doing for her?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
There are various causes for hypoglycemia in dogs and may be due to issues with fasting before surgery, pancreatic disorders, liver disease (glycogen storage), poisoning among other causes. I cannot think of any one specific cause in this case, but you should wait for your Veterinarian to complete tests etc… before considering something like a liver biopsy especially if the liver values are off. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Tommy Lee
Chihuahua
5 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Uncoordination

2am on a Saturday morning, my dog got sick. During the next four hours he got so much worse and started seizuring. I took him to my vet and they directed me to an emergency animal clinic. I was charged $400 before he could be seen. The vet gave him dextrose intravenously which raised his blood sugar and he regained consciousness. But his blood sugar never stabilized after 24hrs. His face started swelling. The on duties vet told me he organs were shutting down and fluid was building in his tissues. He stated I can take his to another emergency hospital to get an ultrasound but my little doggie was on twice as much dextrose to stablize his sugar than the initial dose from when we first arrival at the emergency clinic. His recommendation was to put him down. Nevertheless they will be closing within12 hrs and would have to take him home. I chose to put him down because I didn't want him to suffer nor die horribly. This happened at the end of October and I'm still crying today. Should an emergency clinic have mandatory diagnostic equipment such as ultrasound. And if not in the case of low blood sugar why do they keep him there so long until his organs started shutting down. I pay over $1,800 for this

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
The American Veterinary Medical Association defines an ‘Emergency Facility’ as: “Emergency Facility—A veterinary emergency facility is one with the primary function of receiving, treating, and monitoring of emergency patients during its specified hours of operation. A veterinarian is in attendance at all hours of operation and sufficient staff is available to provide timely and appropriate care. Veterinarians, support staff, instrumentation, medications, and supplies must be sufficient to provide an appropriate level of emergency care. A veterinary emergency service may be an independent, after-hours service; an independent 24-hour service; or part of a full-service hospital.” However, specifics may vary from state to state; if you are displeased with the handling of Tommy Lee’s case, you should contact your state’s Veterinary Board. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM www.avma.org/KB/Policies/Pages/Guidelines-For-Classifying-Veterinary-Facilities.aspx

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Yogi
Dachshund
4 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Low Blood Sugar

My 4 year old male mini dachshund went in for a wellness check and pre surgical screening blood tests. We were thinking about having his teeth cleaned. All his test results came back good except the vet said he had low blood sugar. I brought him back a week later to recheck his sugar and again it was low. His vet said there is an underlying cause for it and that we should test for 3 things: Addison disease, liver shunt, or tumor. She also said though that she highly doubts it us a shunt or tumor as he does not show any other symptoms. He is otherwise healthy and happy. He does sleep a lot however but this could ve due to his age or just because we are not an active family and there isnt a whole lot for him to do. I just got his addison results back and they were normal. My mind is going to worst case scenario now ( tumor) and Im worried. I guess my question is...can a dog simply have low blood sugar caused by something less sinister than a tumor or shunt like maybe an endocronologic problem? Since he doesnt have Addisons...does that mean that it HAS to be either a shunt or tumor??

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. I'm not sure how low Yogi's blood sugar is, but if it is low enough that your veterinarian is concerned, than I suspect it is not normal. An ultrasound might be the next best test to try and determine his liver structures and try to find a tumor if it is there. I hope that he is okay.

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Diesel
Rottweiler
10 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Sleeps a lot

Medication Used

none

My 10 year old Rottweiler collapsed yesterday on his walk. At first he tried to pee and cocked his leg. His standing hind leg collapsed from underneath him. It happened several times, then his front legs collapsed as well. I was able to get him home but then his front left paw collapsed as we walked up the 2 steps to the porch. After a few hours he was ok, although he’s been shaky for a few months, we thought it was just him getting old. I gave him honey in water which he lapped up, he’s lost a lot of weight over the past 6months although his appetite is fine and I’ve even increased his food. He was bouncing around prior to his walk cos he gets excited when I get his lead out of the cupboard. Today he’s been tearing Xmas wrapping paper apart in pure happiness but again is very tired now. Does it sound like hypoglycaemia? He hasn’t had convulsions though, just collapsed and was still awake and responsive.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1067 Recommendations
Thank you for your question. i'm sorry that Diesel is having problems. It would be very unusual for a 10 year old dog to have episodes of hypoglycemia, though not impossible. Without examining him, I'm not sure what miht be going on with him, but a good first step would be to have him examined by your veteirnarian and have some blood work done to evaluate his systemic function. Your vet will be able to identify any other issues that might be contributing to this as well. I hope that he is okay!

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dok
Poodle
1 Year
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weakness
Lethargy

My 1 year old poodle is very lethargic and is fainting for a week now. She doesn't eat and we're just giving her some water and her recovery food.. She has a dilated pupils but her stool and urine is normal so we're suspecting that it's hypoglycemia. We gave her a honey twice but nothings has changed. Plus the vet gave her an iv fluid for 5 days now but still under her weight and doesn't improve. What should we do?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
If honey is ineffective at helping recover Dok from an episode, it may be that the problem is due to another cause like heart failure or similar cause; without examining Dok and running some blood tests we cannot say for sure what the specific case is, a blood test would be valuable as it would show if there was an issue with red blood cells, liver function, kidney function or anything else peculiar. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My chihuahuas hypoglycemic and usually is fine i just let her free feed and give her soft food twice a day. When she has an episode i get syrup and food in her and she usually snaps out of it. Im just wondering how long it should take her to feel normal again. It seems to be between 10 mins and an hour. Is an hour ok

My 9 week old toy chorkie has hypoglycemic episodes at least twice per day and multiple ones during the night, where he can’t walk. The vet has me feeding him via syringe w/ a prescription food because he’s refusing to eat on his own. When he has the episodes I just give him honey or Karo syrup. Is there more of a regimen that I can place him (give honey hourly etc.) on to prevent the episodes from occurring?

My 3 year old terrier mix is 8 pounds and having what I think to be a hypoglycemia episode. He’s rocking back and forth and not himself AT ALL. this happened about 3 months ago as well and we took him to the ER where they gave him corn syrup and glucose. Not sure if I should take him to the vet again? What can I do from now on to prevent this??

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Bella
Jack russel x Manchester terrier
14 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

My dog recently had been unwell and after taking her to the vet they did a blood test and told me she had very low blood sugar levels.she is 14 but very good for her age. She doesn't have Addisons so i am thinking it will be something more sinister causing these symptoms. I would like to know what would be best to do as to finding the cause of this problem. She has had about 4 lots of blood tests done but I don't think they have tested her kidney or liver function. And is it possible to check her pancreas with a blood test. She also had a very low heart rate when we took her to the vet but this has now returned to normal

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
Hypoglycemia may be caused by a decrease in food intake and excessive exercise when it is a primary condition; normally it is secondary to another condition like Addison’s Disease (I know it is ruled out), pancreatic tumours, liver disease, xylitol poisoning among other conditions. I would recommend an ultrasound of the abdomen to look at the structure of the kidneys, liver and pancreas to look for any anomalies; normally blood tests include biochemistry which include liver and kidney function, another test to perform may be a insulin:glucose ratio test which may help indicate if there is an insulin secreting tumour. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Teddy
Yorkshire Terrier
10 Weeks
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea
Tremble
Lethargy

I just bought my puppy and I rushed in to the ER the next day because he wasn't responding and was very lethargic. He went from playing with me and his toys to doing nothing. He just wanted to sleep and not do much. The morning he wouldn't pick himself up and it was very bad. He wouldn't lift his head, and then he would whimper and everything. He had diarrhea and it was a dark brown color, I wouldn't say black but it was more between milk chocolate and dark chocolate. The vet did say it was Hypoglycemia but what are his chances of living. He does tremble but I don't recall he had a seizure, on the drive he would stretch his legs and start making a lot of noise. They did put him in ICU and he will be there for 24 hours.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
Hypoglycemia may be caused by a few possible causes; some isolated incidents can be scary, but sometimes the event is part of a more complicated condition. Generally these cases have a fairly good prognosis, but the underlying cause of the hypoglycemia will determine the overall prognosis and follow up treatment or management. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Stocktin
Shih Tzu
Almost 16
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

My dog was diagnosed with insulinoma. We feed him at least three times a day, just wonder is high protein, high fiber the best to feed him and should we try to
feed him every 2 to 4 hours? He is almost 16 years old Nov 11. Surgery is not
an option since our Vet said the tumors are hard to find. Also what is his life
expectations? One article said 6 months to 2 yrs.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
There are various medical management approaches which may be tried, but there is no one fits all as each case is different and a certain amount of trial and error is required to ensure that everything is balanced. A high fibre diet fed multiple times per day is important along with other supportive care as required. Life expectancy is a big question mark and you also need to take into account current age as well. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM https://wagwalking.com/condition/insulinoma www.acvs.org/small-animal/insulinoma

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Bella
Chihuahua
1 Year
Mild condition
2 found helpful
Mild condition

I have a brindle Chihuahua who is over a year old. Every once and awhile she gets very lethargic, falls over herself, doesn't want to eat or drink, goes under the covers and stays..when you pick her up she is almost unresponsive but just looks around and shakes. It happens at least three to four times a year. I don't know what is wrong with her..sometimes she doesn't want anything to do with food but I have seven dogs so if she doesn't eat her food it gets swiped. I came home from work tonight and she was having one of her weird fits..I gave her some honey and syrup in case of low blood sugar? Is that right? I thought after a year you did not have to worry about hypoglycemia? How long should it take her to bounce back? What kind of advice can you give. I feel like every article is telling me the same things. I am sick of this happening to her.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
Hypoglycemia may occur to a dog at any age and may be brought on by internal and external factors; if you see Bella pick up within an hour of corn syrup and honey, then hypoglycemia is a likely culprit, if not then the cause is due to another condition. A physical examination and round of blood tests would be the first step, but ideally during one of these episodes; hormonal issues, poisoning, blood glucose and other causes may all cause similar symptoms. Other deficiencies like calcium may also cause weakness. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Min min
Chihuahua
4
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

I have a 4 year old female chihuahua who gave birth to 6 puppies , one was still born @ 2 pm yesterday. This morning I found her seizing , urinating on herself and drooling @ 6 am this morning. I gave her corn syrup. She was still pretty out of it so I rushed to emergency vet thinking she may have preeclampsia which the vet agreed that's what it looked like. Ran her calcium levels, it was normal. Ran her blood sugar , normal. So. We went a head an ran further blood tests everything was fine. By 12pm she was pretty much back to normal. Now is it possible she did have low blood sugar and the corn syrup brought her levels back up and all she needed was time to recover from the seizure?? Vet checked her with an ultra sound to see if she maybe was bleeding or had something stuck. But she was all good.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations
It is possible that Min Min had a hypoglycemic event which brought on a seizure, your quick thinking with the corn syrup may have been enough to balance things out. Hypocalemia is also a concern postpartum but it seems thankfully that everything is now fine which is a relief. Now is it important to ensure that Min Min’s dietary intake is increased due to nursing and to help her recover from pregnancy. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I have a 14 year old female dog, she went about two days without her insulin but was eating, it was not until yesturday that she started getting weak. At this point she would not eat for me to give her insulin. So, now I am trying to get her sugar uo with honey and sugar water. I am sorry this sounds so bad but, we are homeless in a hotel and could afford to get it. She was fine until yesturday. She is lathargic now and quiet, still no eating, trying force feed her. If I am able to get a small amount, shoukd I give her, her insulin the full dose or half? Still walking stumbly like. What else can I do for her?

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Finn
English Springer Spaniel
3 Years
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Seizures

Medication Used

None

I have a 3 year old Field Trial Springer Spaniel. He has had 3 episodes of a 2-21/2 minute seizure while hunting at game farms about 3 hours into the hunt or always at the end of the hunt. At first I thought it could be a genetic condition of EIC but it comes on suddenly. Then I was thinking epilepsy but it only has occurred in the field? His father has produce about 30 liters with no pups having this condition that I know of. Also his mother has had 2 repeat breeding with the stud and I have heard of no other issues!
I was planning on breeding this dog but if its hypoglycemia i would like a diagnosis. Also if that is it can I be confident in breed him??

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations

Seizures may be caused by a variety of causes, but may be induced by low blood sugar during exercise as there seems to be a correlation between hunting (after three hours) and an episode. Exercise, pancreatic tumour and a congenital anomaly like a liver shunt may cause low blood sugar. Whether or not you can breed with him, this would be dependent on whether the cause is genetic (like a shunt) or acquired like liver inflammation or pancreatic cancer. Other possible causes may be due to heart disease (would normally present much earlier than three hours) and neurological conditions. An examination by your Veterinarian along with some blood tests may be useful. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Marlowe
German Shepherd
7 Weeks
Critical condition
0 found helpful
Critical condition

Has Symptoms

Weakness
Seizures
Lethargy
Wont eat

Medication Used

Nutri-Cal

After my puppy had a seizure at 7 weeks old, we rushed her to the vet and found out she had hypoglycemia. They gave her some fluids and prescription food that we have to syringe feed her...she will not eat anything on her own and never wants to play or move like a puppy that age should. Is this level of hypoglycemia treatable and what can we do to help her in the long run? We found out this morning another puppy from the same litter crashed yesterday and had to be euthanized for the same problem. Also, what could have caused this is two pups of the same litter?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations

There are various causes for hypoglycemia in a puppy including liver disease (preventing glycogen storage), intestinal disorders, insulin levels or nutrition; also lack of food and increased activity may lead to hypoglycemia. Marlowe’s glucose levels should be checked regularly and an investigation should be made to see if there is a correlation between food consumption and glucose levels over time. Depending on the underlying cause, treatment or management may be required; you would need to speak with your Veterinarian about this. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Marsha
Shih Tzu
3 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Weakness
Lethargic

I have a 3 years old female shih tzu, she had 3 puppies, gave birth safely last year. Today , she was fine and active from morning to about 3 pm, and suddenly she lost conciousness, not fully but she is very lethargic and she doesn't want to open her eyes and move. then i started giving her honey and she is better but then she is lethargic again. I called my vet and he said the she is having low blood sugar, and now i keep feeding her small amount of food frequently and she can eat, also honey and goat milk (meyenberg) to give her some energy, she is slightly better but she still look weak, the difference is too drastic from morning to when the incident happened. what should i do? what kind of test should I do? and if she is hypoglycemia how to maintain her diet, Lack of nutrition is for sure not in the list because i make sure she had enough calories intake as well as vitamin,
please advice, I'm vert worry

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2484 Recommendations

This level of hypoglycemia is very severe by your description and simple dietary management probably wouldn’t be enough. The best course of action would be to have Marsha at your Veterinarian’s Clinic and to have them plot a glucose curve against time to see how her blood glucose changes over time and the effect of her food on her diet. After this, your Veterinarian would have a better understanding of the severity of the hypoglycemia and would be able to advise you accordingly. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Peyaley how is your doxie now? I have recently had an extremely similar situation with my male doxie the same age.

I have a 5 year old dachshund. Healthy and very active. From a routine checkup we found that he has hypoglycemia. First time 55mg/dl. He shows no signs of hypoglycemia. In two weeks time we rechecked, it was 48.
Dr asked us to get a glucometer. We checked his glucose levels 5 hrs after eating. It was 55.
What should we do next?what's the next step in management?

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