Lipoma Average Cost

From 367 quotes ranging from $300 - 5,000

Average Cost

$800

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What is Lipoma?

Though the fatty tissue tumor is typically a mainly cosmetic issue, difficulties can arise for your pet if the tumor is located in an area of the throat (which can impede breathing). If a lipoma on a limb grows to be very large, this can cause discomfort for your dog as well, as he may find it difficult to get comfortable when walking or lying down. Tumors of fat (adipose tissue) tend to be found most often in female dogs that are overweight.

A benign fatty tissue tumor is also known as a lipoma. Fat cells form between the layers of the muscles and skin. Found in many locations on the canine body, lipomas are slow growing and a very common occurrence in dogs.

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Symptoms of Lipoma in Dogs

The usual adipose tissue tumor will be found by you as the owner, when petting your dog, or during a routine check up at the veterinary clinic. Of course, as this type of tumor can become very large, you may see it appear before you are even aware that it has been growing.

  • These tumors are usually soft and smooth, often feeling rubbery
  • They can usually move freely under the skin when touched
  • Merging with local healthy tissue is common
  • This benign mass is often round or oval, and well defined
  • If the tumor moves into muscle, there can be swelling
  • They are regularly seen on the neck, chest, trunk and legs but can also be found in other locations like the tongue
  • Rarely, this type of tumor will appear behind the eye, in the abdomen, or around the head (causing serious secondary effects)
Types

Fatty tissue tumors are classified in two ways. Both types do not customarily mutate into malignant masses, but either form should be removed in order to maintain the health and safety of your beloved canine family member.

  • Non-infiltrative
    • These lipomas are easily removed
    • Recurrence is not common
  • Infiltrative
    • This tumor has extended itself into adjacent muscle and tissue
    • Recurrence happens frequently

It should be noted that a malignant lipoma (liposarcoma) is rare, but can happen.

Causes of Lipoma in Dogs

In many cases, the exact known cause of the adipose tumor is not evident. There are some factors thought to be a cause for benign fatty tissue tumors.

  • Hormones
  • Sun exposure on the skin
  • Chemical exposure in the environment
  • It could be the beginning of a malignancy
  • Viruses
  • Genetics
  • Predisposition has been documented in the following Breeds: Shetland Sheepdogs, Dachshunds, Cocker Spaniels, Weimaraners, Miniature Schnauzers, Labrador Retrievers, Doberman Pinschers, and mixed breeds

Diagnosis of Lipoma in Dogs

When you bring your canine companion to the veterinarian, be prepared for a full examination, and the possibility of further testing in order to receive a definitive diagnosis. The information you can provide in advance of the testing will be of great assistance to the veterinary team. Your veterinarian and her technicians may ask questions as they begin the examination.

  • How long has the tumor been growing, to your knowledge?
  • Does your pet show any pain when you touch the mass?
  • What is his typical diet?
  • Has his appetite been normal of late?
  • Does he exhibit any difficulty when eating?
  • What are his urinary and defecation habits like in recent days?
  • Has his behavior changed at all?

Once your veterinarian has palpated your pet’s chest, limbs, and abdomen for tumors other than what you have been able to show her, she may suggest further testing.

  • A needle aspirate will withdraw oily material and fat cells that will be examined under the microscope (cytology), in order to identify and confirm the fatty tissue tumor
  • A punch biopsy or full excision biopsy may be necessary to examine tissue (histopathology) and rule out a malignant cancerous tumor
  • A radiograph, ultrasound, or computed tomography (CT) scan might be needed in addition, if the suspected tumor is thought to be in an area not easily reached during surgery, and to distinguish the tumor from normal fatty tissue
  • Exploratory surgery could be recommended; for example, if the tumor is in the abdomen

If surgery is required (this is the usual option), then a complete blood count, chemistry profile, and urine test will be done to review the general health of your pet, making assurances that surgery is viable.

Treatment of Lipoma in Dogs

The treatment protocol will have a few variables. The age of your dog, his present state of health, the type of tumor, the location, and the size all have a bearing on the procedure to follow. To be noted, for example, is the fact that if your dog is getting on in age and the tumor does not seem to be causing him distress and is indeed benign, the decision to leave well enough alone could very well be the case.

For our overweight canine family members who may need surgery, there is the possibility of the need to lose some excess weight first, so the veterinary surgeon can accurately distinguish the tumor from normal body fat. The surgeon will have the goal to excise completely the lump, and clearly defined tumor margins are necessary in order to achieve this.

During surgery, your much-loved dog will be carefully monitored. He will receive intravenous fluids and pain medication. While under the anesthesia, the observation of his blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate and rhythm, and oxygen levels will be of utmost importance.

Surgery predominantly solves the adipose tissue tumor problem. In some cases, though, if the tumor has invaded muscle and tissue (infiltrative), then amputation of a limb could be a probability. Your veterinary team can discuss the implications of amputation with you, and put your mind at ease. Many dogs live happy, full lives with three legs, and adjust very well.

Some veterinarians may discuss holistic approaches to tumor control such as acupressure, nutritional management, and herbal therapy.

Recovery of Lipoma in Dogs

In the case of a simple (non-infiltrative) tumor, discharge from the hospital could be the same day. For a more invasive operation, overnight observation could be required.

Once home, your pet will need your diligent care. Pain medication and anti-inflammatories will be administered by you, with the direction of the veterinary team. Make sure your dog does not lick the wound. Your veterinarian will suggest an Elizabethan collar if she thinks it is needed. Monitor the incision for irritation or infection, and call the clinic if you have concerns about the healing process. Exercise will not be permitted for 3 weeks to a month after the surgery.

It should be noted that infiltrative tumors have been documented to return within a year in up to 30 percent of cases. Continued weight control is important, and may slow the regrowth possibility.

Lipoma Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

KODA
Siberian Husky
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

I have a Siberian husky 10 years old now. He is fixed and up to date o shots. He has a rather large limpoma on the right back side right before his back leg. The vet wanted him to lose weight but his mass has only grown in size. Was the size of a baseball now it's the size of a volleyball. He doesn't seem to be under any discomfort, he eats normal, plays, and walks. But I feel like he could be hiding any discomfort. Since the mass keeps growing shouldn't I push the vet to remove It? Or at least make it smaller?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations
A volleyball is around 8.15 inches in diameter (thank you Google) which is a significant size for a lipoma or any mass; you should discuss options to either have it removed or surgical debulking especially if it is getting bigger. Your Veterinarian may have a valid concern regarding surgery so ask them their thoughts as there may be an underlying issue they are concerned about. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Satchmo
Miniature Schnauzer
12 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

There are no symptoms

My mini schnauzer has a very large fatty tumor on the inside of his back left leg. It is about the size of a tennis ball and also runs down the length of his leg into his foot. We had this removed when he was younger. He is now 12. This tumor has come back with a vengeance.
He walks on the leg. He is eating normally. He still runs and jumps.
It only seems to interfere with him if he bumps it or falls on it. Then he will usually limp around for several minutes. The vet says the tumor is probably intertwined with the muscle, tendons, etc. and he wouldn't be able to remove it and it could possibly cause Satchmo to lose his leg. I am worried about the size of the tumor. Could it get so large that it would split the skin of his leg/foot? He left rear leg is a little more than twice the size of his normal right leg. I'm not sure about how to proceed. I do not want my Satchmo to lose his leg and I don't want him to have problems walking and just enjoying life in these later years. Have you ever heard of or seen anything like this before? How was it treated? What was the final outcome?
Thank you for your assistance.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations
If the lipoma has infiltrated muscle and other tissue it would impossible to remove entirely and chance of recurrence would be high; debulking is an option but again it would come back. Whilst the skin on the leg splitting open on the leg is a little extreme, it is possible the the skin may ulcerate or rub on the other leg, floor or other places; also the leg may cause issues walking in the future. A decision to amputate is yours, but I generally see owners more distressed about the loss of a limb than an animal, they just seem to get on and adapt. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lucky
Golden Retriever
7 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Open hole with fluid seeping out
Open whole with fluid seeping out

My 7 yr old Golden just had 3 of these removed yesterday. Should his vet have prescribed him an antibiotic or an anti inflammatory? I asked her and she said no but it is concerning to me. Also she had a drain put in for excess fluid to drain out of the big one that was attached to his muscle. That has now fallen out and he now just has an open wound with fluid seeking out She says it will heal and close up on its own within a day. I don’t want to override what she is saying after all she is tohe vet but it just seems Kinda weird. Please help!

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
502 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Without seeing the wounds, or the drainage, I can't comment on whether Lucky should hve received antibiotics or pain medications, but if you are not sure, you are always able to ask your veteirnarian - situations change, as well, and she may want to know that he has drainage, or if you think he is painful after his surgery. She my change her mind and prescribe them if you feel that he needs them. I hope that everything goes well for him.

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Peanut
Puggle
11 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Open wound on fatty tissue tumor

Round fatty tumor on ankle part of dog- been tested not cancerous. It broke open in two areas. The best way to care for it. Surgery isn’t an option due to age. He is a 11 yrs old pug.

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
502 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Sometimes, benign tumors can still cause problems, getting infected or having trauma due to location on the body. If the tumor has broken open, it would be best to have your veterinarian look at it, determine if it needs antibiotics, or padded bandages, and give you the appropriate treatment. Unfortunately, I cannot comment on how to treat the lesion, as I cannot see it. As as aside, if he is a healthy 11 year old pug with no systemic problems, surgery to remove the mass might be a better option for him to remove that lump. I hope that everything goes well for him.

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Diesel
ridgeback/lab
10 Years
Serious condition
1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Large mass on chest

Medication Used

none at this time

My 10 year old dog has a lipoma in his chest. It is not hurting him or his movement however it is very large. It's probably 6"x6"x4" in size. I don't know if this should be removed. I worry about his age, anastetics, it growing back, and the cost. Do you know if this something we should have removed? If so, do you have an idea at what I am looking at in cost?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations

The decision to remove a lipoma should be made with your Veterinarian but by the size you have described, I would think it may be best to have it removed as it may cause issues in the future especially considering its size. Anaesthesia becomes riskier as an animal ages, but full blood tests prior to surgery will give an indication of Diesel’s general ability to handle anaesthesia. The lipoma itself may present problems depending on if it is ‘free moving’ or ‘infiltrated’ as infiltrated lipomas are more difficult to remove especially if they are bound to the chest wall. This would be a discussion to have with your Veterinarian and to determine cost as the cost would vary widely depending on the type of lipoma and the involvement in surrounding tissues. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My dog has a lipoma in his groin area inside his right hind leg. It's now 2 1/2 x 2 1/2". The Dr said to leave it unless it get to big. When is it to big? My dog is 5 years old and I hate to have surgery unless it's really needed.

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Dingo
Catahoula
11
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Large lipoma

Medication Used

antibiotics

My 11 yr old. Catahoula has had lipoma's for a few years - nothing that has slowed him down. He has now developed one under his front leg that is becoming quite large, I am afraid it will soon affect his mobility. I took him to our vet which recommended either taking him to a specialist or just palliative care. I am quite certain it is large enough to be in his muscle. It does not limit his movement much at this point - but soon.
What are your thoughts - can a lipoma the size of a softball be removed from that area? Chances of recovery at his age?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations
A lipoma is either infiltrative or non-infiltrative and size has nothing to do with it, generally when a lipoma is becoming a nuisance and causing issues with mobility we will look at removing it. If your Veterinarian has offered to refer you a Specialist, I think you should go to just explore your options so that you can make an informed decision for Dingo. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Suzie
Labrador
11
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Dog has just had second operation to remove lipomas. This time the lipoma was under, near or attached to muscle in the abdominal area, meaning that the muscle had to be cut for removal. She had non-absorbing stitches which were removed today, how long should it take for this wound to completely heal so that she is free to monkey around as usual? She likes to come up and down the stairs with me and generally bounce around like a pup and I was wondering how long I should be trying to prevent this behaviour. Also, she has been wearing a dogease wound protection suit for over a week and seems to have developed hard dry lumps of skin under the fur around the tops of the front legs - she has been licking at these dry patches and now they look quite red, swollen and sort of raw/inflamed, is this something I should be concerned about? Thanks

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations
You should keep Suzie’s activity restricted for another week at least to make sure she is fully recovered and then keep activity low building up over the next week. The rough patches of skin should clear up on their own and would be something similar to calluses, just stop her from licking them. If you have any concerns you should consult your Veterinarian. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bear
Schipperke
11
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

My Schipperke Bear has a soft mass along his chest area that is quite large and 2 smaller soft round masses inside his hind leg and along the ribs. The only time they are painful is if he’s picked up wrong. Since he’s black and has a heavy double coat he just looks fat. He’s 11. Should I be worried and why doesn’t his brother, same age have any?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations
If the masses are lipomas, they may affect one dog and not the other; some dogs are prone to them whilst others have no issue, age has nothing to do with the occurrence of lipomas. Normally lipomas are not an issue unless they restrict movement or get in the way of limbs; if you haven’t had your Veterinarian examine the masses already, I would suggest you do. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Captain
Small Mixed
4yrs
Fair condition
1 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Growth

I have a 4yr old mini schnauzer/lhaso mix (20lbs). He has a lipoma or growth, about the size of a nickel on the center of his back. How much should I budget to get it removed? It's free moving, round, doesn't seem to hurt him, it's just unsightly.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations

A movable lipoma on the back will be relatively easy to remove as it wouldn’t have infiltrated any surrounding structures; the cost to remove the lipoma will vary depending on your Veterinarian, your location and aftercare, a general estimate will be between $300 and $700. Your Veterinarian may take a fine needle aspirate to confirm the diagnosis. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

It costs $500 where I am at, but we don't have enough money for it, today I found my dog's fatty tumor scratched up and almost open, what should i do?

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Tico
Chihuahua
1year 5 months
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Our 1 year & 5 month old male chichuachua has his 3rd lump. The first one was removed when we had him neutered. It was pea sized. A couple of months after that he developed a large ( bigger than a silver dollar) on his right shoulder area. We had it removed. No cancer either time. The second one had a drain tube that drove him crazy. He was miserable!!!! Now he has a 3rd one on his right upper hip/back area. It doesn’t bother him. Is it safe to have surgery again & why does he keep developing these things?? I’m taking him to the vet next week to see what he thinks.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations
Most lipomas can be left as they rarely cause a problem for dogs unless they get too large or obstruct the movement of limbs. Some dogs have one lipoma and that is it, whilst other dogs seem to get them regularly. The specific cause of lipomas is unknown, but inflammation of fat is suspected. Have your Veterinarian check the new mass and determine whether it is a lipoma or something more serious. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ceasar
shi tzu
4 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

My Shi Tzu is 4 or 5..a rescue ..so not sure of his age. He had a fatty tumer on his back that the vet advised was not harmful. We acquired another younger dog and they play pretty rough the tumer broke open and there was alot of discharge..looked like fat. My vet gave me surgical wipes and he received a antibiotic shot. Several weeks have passed and my dog is doing great..no problems with his health. But the wound keeps breaking open and is very slow to heal. It is not swollen or red. Should I keep cleaning everyday or let it scab over? I have tried both but is seem to still get broken open everyday.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations
I would suggest to keep cleaning the wound but to keep your dogs separate for a week or so to prevent trauma from play fighting, I know this may cause them some distress but you need to consider the bigger picture. Rest will help the wound heal and if necessary give Caesar cage rest to prevent excessive activity. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Roxy
Scottish Terrier
9 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Lump

My Scotty has had her lump for about 8 months now and it has been growing very large in size. She is set for surgery and it's finally coming up in one week. (Vet is in another state and I only trust him. Plus cost was a good deal. Plus he was booked up.) She never reacts when I touch it or feel around it, but it's fairly large. It's on her left side. I know her surgery is coming up and she has had no changes in anything: Food, excercise, etc. I'm just curious to if it actually is putting her in discomfort? Like sleeping or walking. Or if it feels heavy to her. I feel so bad that she has had to wait, but it's coming off soon. I just want to make sure she is always comfortable.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations
Lipomas can be uncomfortable but are rarely painful; depending on their location and whether they are infiltrative or not they may cause problems with movement especially if they are on the chest behind the shoulder or flank area. It is important that you feel comfortable with your Veterinarian and that you trust waiting a little longer is in Roxy’s best interests; I would just give her love and support leading up to the surgery and ensure that she is as comfortable as possible. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Katie
German Sheppard mix
16.5
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

None. Diagnosed during regular check
Lipoma

Dog has a large lipoma it looks to be blistering is two spots. It has been there for years and checked in the past. She is 16.5 years old. The size is probably 8" x 8" on her right front shoulder. I'm worried about her going under for surgery.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations

Surgery in our older friends is always concerning, but with appropriate management (pre surgery blood tests, modern anaesthetics etc…) these risks and concerns can be lowered to get the best resolution; there is still risk involved, but it is a managed risk. Blood tests, thorough physical examination and supportive care would give Katie the best chance of pulling through. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I was giving my 50 beagle 37 boston terrior 13% bull dog dna taken a massage on her mid chest a small 1.2 dime size growth . Does this sound like a fatty tumor. I am in the middle of moving cross country. I am so nervous she my baby. I had a cocker spanial that had a stomach growth the vet said it was nothing this thing grew so big and she lived to be 14 but it was hug . I am so worried.

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Bella
Chihuahua
10
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Discharge licking genitals

My chihuahua had a recent ovary sparing spay about 10 days ago. She is now in heat and experiencing some brown discharge. Her heat came early and we didn't realize it had started when she got the surgery. I just realized that what was thought to be a fatty tumor (never aspirated) in her lower abdomen is no longer there. I saw something weird looking in her poop like a casing or grey tissue matter and wonder if that could be from the tumor. Should I be worried about the stuff that was within the fatty tumor now in her body. Should she be on antibiotics? Could it be causing the brown discharge? I know stump pyometra could be a concern.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations

It may be that your Veterinarian removed the lipoma during the spay as it may have been close enough to the incision site to remove without an addition incision, but your Veterinarian should have advised you that the lipoma has been removed; it is normal to combine surgeries together into one (if medically possible). The anomaly you found in the faeces wouldn’t be due to the tumour, but could have been mucus or other secretions being defecated; after surgery Bella should be on antibiotics, the brown discharge is concerning and may be due to an infection post surgery. It would be best to visit your Veterinarian to see about the discharge and to ask about the lipoma. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Buck
Labrador Retriever
8 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lumps Under Skin

Medication Used

None

I have a lab with lots of fattie tumors! There is one growing in his hind leg seems to be also in muscle! But I'm not a vet. Lol he swims every day and just lately he will limp if he dose to much jumping in . do you think it hurts him? And what can be done! Also can dogs get depressed? We travel to Florida for 7 months and he loves his pool,I mean he really loves he seems to be a fish lol! Now when we come home Chicago there is no water he also keeps looking for pool! To me he's depressed because he is just laying around and not active at all seems sad! Please help!

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations

Lipomas may be infiltrative or non-infiltrative; when a lipoma infiltrates muscle, it may cause pain, discomfort, muscle atrophy and may cause problems with movement. Many dogs live with multiple lipomas without incident (apart from cosmetically), whilst other dogs may have problems due to infiltration or causing problems with movement. Dogs may get depressed, if Buck has spent seven months enjoying himself with a pool, it may be difficult for him to adjust to a garden after that amount of time. Visit your Veterinarian for an examination of the lipomas just to keep a check on them. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Bella
maltese & miniature pinscher
10 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

discomfort

I found a bump on my dog's right ribcage. It seems to be pultruding through the ribs. She is 10 years old maltese/mini pin mix. She seems to be in discomfort when I feel around the area. Thoughts? It's no bigger than 2" wide and I'd say about a thumbnail sticking out of her ribs. It's also pretty deep. It's feels like an inch.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations

Lipomas usually don’t cause much discomfort but may be complicated if they are infiltrative; osteosarcoma is a common type of tumour present which originates from the ribs (around 75% of cases). There are many times of lumps and bumps which may occur on a dog; it would be best to have your Veterinarian take a look and they may perform a fine needle aspirate to see if there are any strange looking cells or fluids present. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.acvs.org/files/proceedings/2012/data/papers/107.pdf

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sophie
mixed formosan and basenji we think
15 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Lumps Under Skin

Our formosan mix got her vaccinations about 2 weeks ago, and last week i noticed a pea size lump in the area of injection. it feels pretty hard and she feels no pain when i touch it. Should i get this checked? Also, would this fall under the exam since this showed up after her injection and in the same area?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations

Injection site sarcoma is an uncommon occurrence in cats, but not in dogs (although cases have been reported). It would be best to visit your Veterinarian to confirm the type of mass present and whether it should be removed. I’ve included a case report in the link below as we don’t currently have an article about it in dogs. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM
www.cliniciansbrief.com/sites/default/files/sites/cliniciansbrief.com/files/Injection%20Site%20Sarcoma%20in%20a%20Dog.pdf

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Gracie
Chocolate lab
10 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Lump in chest

Our chocolate lab has now had 2 lumps removed in last two months and a 3rd has now come up on the oppersite side she is 10 years old and not sure weather to have this one removed or leave alone this 3rd one has grown very quickly indeed
She is not in pain as far as I can see
But it would mean a 3rd annasetic in 4 months

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations

Many times lipomas are harmless and are non-intrusive allowing animals to live and move without hindrance; however, sometimes they may cause problems where they would need to be removed or at other times owners elect to have lipomas removed for cosmetic purposes. Speak with your Veterinarian at your next visit about the lipoma and they may advise to not operate. It is important to have the lipoma diagnosis confirmed before just monitoring it. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Nita
Chow mix
7 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Large mass under her jaw on neck

My 7 year old mixed breed (part chow) has a large tumor around her neck area (3x4). She does not seem to be in any pain but I worry about it. It use to bleed when she scratched but it does not anymore. I want to take her to the vet but I am nervous about what they might say. How much do you think it will cost if it is non-cancerous?

Thank you,
Gary

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2001 Recommendations

If the cause is due to a lipoma and it is minimally invasive surgery costs will be low, it is hard to say how much it would cost for removal since price will depend on your location; generally you can look between $300-$1,000 (normally around the top end of the scale), if the lipoma has infiltrated local tissues or has grown around structures in the neck, surgery will be above $1,000. Worse case scenario is that the mass isn’t a lipoma and is a tumour or abscess which would vary the cost significantly. The best course of action would be to visit your Veterinarian and have them take a fine needle aspirate from the mass to determine the type of cells and the origin of the mass so that they can give you an accurate quote. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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