Nasal Passage Narrowing Average Cost

From 71 quotes ranging from $500 - 3,000

Average Cost

$1,500

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What is Nasal Passage Narrowing?

Nasal passage narrowing in dogs, or nasopharyngeal stenosis, is a disorder where the part of the nasal passage, called the nasopharynx caudal, up to the choanae (which opens into the nasopharynx) is abnormally narrow. This causes a moderate to severe amount of respiratory “sounds”, such as snoring, gasping, or other sounds that reflect an obstructed flow of air.  

The back of the nasal passage where the trachea and esophagus are located is called the nasopharynx. The air travels back through the nasal passages and goes through this section before entering the trachea. When the airflow isn’t adequate due to the narrow passages, the dog suffers due to the obstruction.

Nasopharyngeal stenosis is a treatable condition where the nasal passages of the dog are abnormally narrow, thus causing respiratory symptoms due to the air obstruction.

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Symptoms of Nasal Passage Narrowing in Dogs

There are many different symptoms of this disorder, and some of them may be mistaken for another condition. It is important to have the veterinarian take a closer look if your dog has any of the following symptoms. Symptoms include:

  • Sneezing
  • Discharge of the nasal cavity
  • Breathing with mouth opened
  • Snoring
  • Loud breathing
  • Labored breathing

Types

There are other conditions that are differential diagnoses for nasopharyngeal stenosis. Different types of disorders that have the same types of symptoms include:

  • Nasal growth, polyp, or tumor
  • Allergies
  • Rhinitis
  • Foreign body in nasal passages

Causes of Nasal Passage Narrowing in Dogs

There are several different causes of this treatable condition. Causes can include:

  • Chronic sinusitis
  • Allergens and irritants
  • Obstruction in the nasal passages or cavity
  • Chronic inflammation of nasal passages
  • Excess tissue after an infection
  • Inflammation after vomiting 
  • Trauma

Diagnosis of Nasal Passage Narrowing in Dogs

If your dog is exhibiting any symptoms, it is important to make an appointment with your medical professional. The veterinarian will begin with questions about the history of the dog’s condition, such as any previous ailments and how long the current symptoms have been prevalent. 

Tests will be performed, such as a complete blood count, a urinalysis, and a biochemistry profile. These are basic tests that can give the veterinarian a great deal of information about the dog’s bodily systems and if they are working properly. The veterinarian will need to do several types of imaging to take a closer look at the nasal area. CT scans and radiography will help the vet make a diagnosis of narrowing of the nasal passage. A catheter may also be used, or a bronchoscope, to look internally with good results.

Treatment of Nasal Passage Narrowing in Dogs

In the majority of the cases of narrowing of nasal passages in dogs, surgery is really the best option. The treatment process includes:

Balloon Dilation

This is a minimally invasive procedure, and it is quite effective. When this is performed, a stent is placed in the narrow opening, or stenotic area, to allow air to flow more freely. General anesthesia is required for this procedure.

Antibiotics

Once the surgery is complete, antibiotics will be prescribed to prevent infection from occurring. The amount of antibiotics depends on the veterinarian’s decision, but it is important to give them to your dog from start to finish.

Recovery of Nasal Passage Narrowing in Dogs

Dogs that have the balloon dilation successfully completed have a great prognosis with nasopharyngeal stenosis. After the dog has the stent put in, there will be specific instructions to follow for after care and also a list of symptoms in which to keep a watchful eye. 

The veterinarian will give you an antibiotic to administer to your canine, and he may be in a moderate amount of pain after the surgery. It is important to give your dog the correct dosage at the same time each day, and finish all of the medication. The medical professional may also prescribe pain relievers for your pet for a few days until he feels like himself again. Even after a successful procedure of balloon dilation, your canine may have a recurrence and may even need another procedure. This is not uncommon.

Nasal Passage Narrowing Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Gabby
Australian Shepherd
9 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Trouble breathing excessive snot

When you have the stint placed in the nose what holds it in place? We have had 2 balloon dilation and they helped for a couple of days the vet that did it recommended the stint placement but our regular vet does not because she said that the stint might come out

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations
Stent placement is done by inserting and placing the stent in the desired position then expanding the stent to open the passage and is locked into place; the stent being expanded will hold it into place. From your description, it sounds like stent placement would be a good fit after another balloon dilation. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Gabby
Australian Shepherd
9 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Trouble breathing, excessive snot

Our 8 month old Australian shepherd has been diagnosed with nasopharyngeal stenosis caused by aspriating during her spay surgery we have had 2 of the balloon dilations that helped for a couple of days the vet that did it recommended the stint placement but our regular vet does not because she said that the stint might come out i dont understand why it would but is that possible and what would be your recommendation because we need to do something she is getting worse and i know its hard on her.

Thank you
Gabbys mom

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1048 Recommendations
If Gabby is having trouble breathing, the stent may be the only option for her. It might be a good idea to get the opinion of a specialist since your two veterinarians do not agree on the course of treatment. Specialists are often able to help shed light on a situation, and a surgeon may have an idea as to alternate therapies for her. I hope that everything goes well for her.

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Stretch
Daschund
14 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Fatigue
Enlarged Lymph Nodes
Difficulty breathing through nose
Sneezing

I have a 14 year old dachshund that started developing trouble breathing through his nose he has a snoring sound when he inhales. He struggles so hard to breathe through his nose all this started a very short time ago after dealing with a chronic yeast infection of the skin that was repeatedly being treated with antibiotics and steroids never an antifungal. I have went to 3 different vets. They treated him for an upper resp infection at the first start of the breathing issue with no relief. Some days he seems to do better than others but mostly he just seems pitiful. You can tell he doesn't feel good. We have been discussing having him put to sleep but are reluctant because we love him so much and don't want to give up on him to soon if something can be done I just feel that the vets around here that I have taken him to are not taking it as serious as they should that they only try a quick fix and guess work. He has lost some weight and his breathe is really bad they sai it could be a mass but could not say for sure. X-ray showed some lung infiltrate and she said there was a suspicious area under his jawline.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations
There are various conditions which may affect a dog’s breathing, especially as they age which may include infection, cancer, allergies, inflammation, polyps, laryngeal disorders among other causes. Stretch (nice name for a Dachshund) would need a thorough examination in order to determine an underlying cause; at this point in his life, extensive testing may be unrewarding. It is important to ensure that he isn’t struggling to breathe and his body has an adequate amount of oxygen; if Stretch has breathing difficulties, it is starting to impact his overall welfare and no definitive cause has been determined it may be a case of putting him to sleep. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Willo
Shiba Inu
8 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Reverse sneezing and normal sneezing
Clear snot
Sneezing

My dog has been diagnosed with nasopharyngeal stenosis caused by acid reflux from her spay surgery. She breathes through her mouth and a little bit through her nose. We can't afford the stent surgery. Is it life threatening or can she live her life without the stent? My dog is 8 months old shiba Inu. She is energetic and doesn't seem to be hindered by it. She just gets clear snotty at times. Also pants more compared to my 2 year old shiba

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2469 Recommendations

Stent surgery is the treatment of choice; however I understand your financial situation. The severity and the need for surgery would be dependent on Willo’s individual case; if the surgery isn’t performed there would be life long breathing difficulties and exercise intolerance, it is likely that the intolerance will increase in severity as she ages. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

The same thing happened to our 8 month old Australian shepherd we have had 2 balloon dilations that helped for a couple of days the vet that did it recommended the stint placement but our regular vet does not because she said that the stint might come out, I'm not sure why she thinks that, what is your opinion because we have to do something it's getting horrible.

Thank you,
Gabbys mom

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