Peanut Butter Allergies Average Cost

From 323 quotes ranging from $200 - 800

Average Cost

$400

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What are Peanut Butter Allergies?

Peanut butter is a widely known and delicious spread that many people use and enjoy within their diet. It has been known by dog owners that dogs enjoy peanut butter as well. Many dog owners do not hesitate to give the dogs a taste of peanut butter as a treat or as an easy way for them to take any medications.

Peanut butter allergies occur in people quite often, as many are allergic to peanuts as well as other nuts. People with severe nut allergies often times must carry around an EpiPen if they were to ingest this nut in order to avoid anaphylactic shock.

Although peanut butter is a tasty treat and many dogs do love the taste, there are some dogs that may be allergic to peanut butter. Sadly, many dog owners find that out after giving them a spoonful, as many dogs begin to develop mild, moderate, and even severe allergies right away. Peanut butter allergies in dogs can be caused by dogs being allergic to the peanuts themselves or to ingredient, known as Xylitol, which is found in specific types of peanut butter.

Peanut butter allergies in dogs are the results of dogs being allergic to peanuts or having a reaction from an ingredient in the peanut butter, which is known as xylitol.

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Symptoms of Peanut Butter Allergies in Dogs

Symptoms of peanut butter allergies in dogs will vary; his symptoms may show up over time if he is fed peanut butter as a treat on a regular basis, or immediately, such as in the case of anaphylactic shock. Symptoms may include:

  • Red and itchy skin
  • Excessive licking of the skin
  • Bald spots
  • Hotspots
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Agitation

Types

There are two types of peanut butter allergies in dogs. The type of allergy that your dog may have depends on your dog’s immune system and tolerability of peanut butter and peanuts alone. The two types of peanut butter allergies are:

  • Atopic dermatitis, or skin allergies
  • Internal bodily reactions

The types of allergies your veterinarian may want to test in order to come to a definitive diagnosis of a peanut butter allergy include:

  • Plant allergy, such as pollen
  • Inhalant allergy, such as mold
  • Food allergy from another type of food ingredient
  • Dust allergy

Causes of Peanut Butter Allergies in Dogs

Causes of peanut butter allergies in dogs are from your dog ingesting peanut butter, either in small amounts regularly or a one-time amount. Specific causes of peanut butter allergy in dogs include:

  • The chemical known as histamine which fights the allergen
  • A hypersensitive immune system to the ingredients in peanut butter
  • Untreated histamine response to the peanut butter causing anaphylactic shock
  • An allergic reaction to Xylitol, an ingredient in specific types of peanut butter

Diagnosis of Peanut Butter Allergies in Dogs

If you suspect your dog is having an allergic reaction to a specific food, namely peanut butter, make an appointment with your veterinarian before it becomes too severe. If you are unsure that your dog is having a peanut butter allergy, your veterinarian may choose to perform specific types of tests in order to come to a definitive diagnosis.

For many types of allergy symptoms, veterinarians tend to wait on specific allergy testing, but if he knows that you are feeding him peanut butter from time to time for treats or in order for him to take any medications, he may want to go ahead and perform an allergy test since a peanut butter allergy can turn into a severe situation, such as in anaphylactic shock.

Your veterinarian may perform blood testing, urinalysis, and biochemistry profile to rule out any other underlying illnesses. He will also ask you a variety of questions about your dog’s diet, agents in which he comes into contact with on a regular basis, how often he has an allergic reaction, and any other questions that will help him come to a diagnosis.

Your veterinarian may choose to do a skin test on your dog to identify a specific allergen, or perform a type of allergy test on your dog which includes a tiny amount of a specific allergen, in this case peanut butter, to your dog’s skin. Your veterinarian may also choose to do blood testing to determine this type of allergy.

Treatment of Peanut Butter Allergies in Dogs

In terms of treatment, the only type of treatment that is effective is the avoidance of peanut butter altogether. This is the one thing that will help your dog recover from a peanut butter allergy. Temporary treatment methods may include:

Topical Creams

If your dog suffers from irritated or inflamed skin from the peanut butter allergy, your veterinarian may choose to apply an antihistamine or other healing, topical cream to your dog’s skin to allow it to heal. Once the peanut butter is removed from his diet, the skin condition  will clear up, so these topical medications will only be temporary.

Antihistamines

Your veterinarian may give you a prescription for an antihistamine for your dog if he is having difficulty breathing due to ingesting peanut butter. This type of treatment is solely symptomatic and depends on the severity of your dog’s ability to breathe. If your dog is suffering from anaphylactic shock, your veterinarian will immediately act on dispensing an antihistamine into your dog’s system and will need to keep him hospitalized until he recovers.

Recovery of Peanut Butter Allergies in Dogs

Once you have discovered that your dog is suffering from a peanut butter allergy, do not feed him peanut butter or peanuts in any form. Avoid all treats or foods that contain peanuts or peanut butter; your veterinarian may also recommend that you avoid nuts altogether.

If your veterinarian chose to perform specific allergy tests, he may have found that your dog is allergic to other items in addition to peanut butter. If this is the case, remove these items from your dog’s diet immediately.

Once your dog is home from the hospital, in the case of a severe peanut butter allergy, or home from the veterinarian’s office visit, be sure to follow your veterinarian’s instructions on how to care for your dog at home. He will also alert you to any other symptoms you need to watch out for, including any side effects from an antihistamine if this medication was given to your dog. If you have a prescription for an antihistamine or a topical ointment, be sure to follow the instructions carefully on how to administer the medication properly.

Peanut Butter Allergies Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Angel
pit bull terrier
5 Years
Serious condition
-1 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Peanut butter

My dog has hives all over her she is a 5 yr put bull and I think it might be from peanut butter, it has been for 2 days now I have stopped the peanut butter, and started benadryl 50 mg every 8hrs but it is not work I g very well what else can is do ?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. If Angel hasn't been seen by your veterinarian, it would be best to do so. Hives caused by peanut butter are uncommon in dogs, but bacterial, fungal or parasitic diseases are common. Without examining her, I can't comment on what might be happening, but your veterinarian will be able to examine her and give her appropriate therapy.

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Marcellus
German Shepherd, collie mix
2 Years
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

swollen face
itchy face
Puffy eyes

Medication Used

benadryl 50mg

My dog has had peanut butter milk bones before and had no allergic reaction. However today he had a few almonds and cashews from a trail mix bag that was surrounded by peanuts(he didn't eat any of the actual peanuts), and his whole face swelled up. It has been a little over 10 hours since we started giving him benadryl and have done two doses but it doesn't seem to help the swelling. He is 45 lbs by the way. Is this bad for his face to be swollen? It isn't affecting his breathing or eating/drinking. Is there any other home remedies to help? Is it normal for a dog to get this swollen for this amount of time over peanut dust on a few almonds?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations
Dogs may develop allergies to foods which they have always eaten in the past, also processed products containing nuts may be different after processing; nut allergies are in fact rare in dogs. However, you should continue giving Benadryl at 1mg/lb up to three times per day; there isn’t anything I can recommend that is available over the counter and would suggest visiting your Veterinarian for an examination and to control the swelling with something more effective than Benadryl. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Trudi
Blue Heeler
18 Months
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Sores
Loss of fur
scratching
Itching
Loss of Appetite

Medication Used

Last perscribed was bravecto

Hello,

I am not really sure my pup has a pb allergy, but she definitely has something going on that hasn't been resolved. She developed these sores on her head a few months ago and she started itching them which caused fur loss and scabbing. I took her to the vet and they did a skin scrape to check for mites and was negative. They prescribed simplicef which didn't clear up the sores. I then took her to another vet and she said it looks like mange so they did another skin scrape which came back negative and couldn't give me a definitive answer. She said even though test was negative that her symptoms pointed towards mange. So they gave her a one time bravecto about a month ago and it has not cleared. I think the only that cleared up her sores on her head was the colloidal silver that I bought from Chewy.com, but the fur hasn't grown back in one area, but seemed almost healed until she scratched it again the other day. Recently she has been rubbing & scratching her eyes which has caused some fur loss above eye & at bottome corners of eyes at tear duct. She doesn't seem to have any additional discharge from her eyes than just the normal morning amount. I started thinking it was her diet so I took her off meat kibble and went to a salmon kibble by Zignature. It seems like she has lost her appetite in the morning and only eats once at night and sometimes she's even fussy about that. I stopped giving her treats that contained any poultry and just do natural treats from Only Natural Pet. The peanut butter that I have been using is from Green Coast Pet that is gluten free and contains no xylitol and only contains two ingredients USA grown peanuts & flaxseed. Also the only method that has worked to keep her from scratching those areas was putting Pawz rubber dog boots on her two back paws. She still has some anxiety so the cone didn't work. I am also dealing with some separation anxiety where she will excessively salivate when left in her crate when I'm gone. I thought I had that under control as it was very bad when I adopted her back in September 2017, but started again within the last month.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations
Allergies are a strong possibility here, however without being able to identify the allergen we are left a little in the dark; allergy testing would be useful as it would determine which (if any) of the common allergens is affecting Trudi. A negative skin scraping doesn’t rule out mange, it is just doesn’t confirm it; other possible tests may be a biopsy of a lesion for histopathology to see if any additional information may be gathered. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

I was feeding a dog captain wafers sandwich crackers and peanut butter and honey and I fed him three crackers. I didn't know he had a foood allergy. I want to know if hes gooing to be ok

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Tesla
Doberman Pinscher
6 Years
Moderate condition
2 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

licking
Scratching often.
scratching and chewing paws and legs
Itchy

Dog has been itching and scratching for 10 days. Hair has been completely scratched out in some places. No unusual scratching or hair loss before 10 days ago, when I gave her a big spoon of peanut butter for the first time. Could a pb reaction last this long? I tried a calming skin spray, a bath, and Benadryl. None helped much.

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations

The problem with reactions like these (it is most likely due to the peanut butter), is that the scratching will cause the skin to be more inflamed which will lead to more scratching which can be a vicious circle to break. It would be best to visit your Veterinarian to get some ointment or topical antibiotics (secondary infection of scratches can be serious). Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Thank you

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Ruby
Labrador Retriever
2 Years
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Heavy panting, excessive linking
heavy panting

I let my lab lick the empty peanut butter jar out. She's done this lots of times. Shortly after she did this today...she puked just a little. Now is licking her lips and pants excessively, could this be some weird reaction?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
There is quite a bit of fat in peanut butter, and it isn't good for dogs in large amounts. If you had low fat peanut butter, it may have xylitol, and she should see a veterinarian right away, as that is toxic to dogs. Otherwise, she may just have an upset stomach, and it may resolve. If she continues to pant and be nauseous, it would be best to have her seen by a veterinarian.

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Sherman
Labrador Retriever
5
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Somtimes scaley back with scabs.
Red looks like a burn, some bumps

Medication Used

I have been using benydryl
I have been using medicated shampoo from vet

I just figured it out My dog has allergies to so much outdoor pollens and rag weed maple trees dust mites ect. We have been to the vet so many time costing tons of money. I give him peanut butter for his meds and do training with it or give as a treat. he gets terrible rashes, and it has been winter so no outdoor allergens. Except the dust mites which are everywhere. Do you think this is the cause of all his red rashes sometimes huge scabbing on his back from welts?

Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
2973 Recommendations

It is possible that Sherman has developed an allergy to peanut butter, the best way to test this theory is to stop giving him peanut butter for his meds and to literally place them at the back of his throat and and get them down this way; there are videos on youtube showing how to do this gently and efficiently. This way, the skin lesions should start to resolve if peanut butter is the cause; also, try to not have peanut butter in his environment. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Stick the pill(s) in a small cube of boiled chicken breast. I doubt many dogs would turn that down - mine won't! I feel like shoving things down his throat will only traumatize him.

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Angel
pit bull terrier
5 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Reaction to peanut butter hives
Reaction to peanut butter hiv

It has been 2 days and she is not really getting better , she is still eating , drinking , and activities are in full geer , but hives are not going always she is breathing fine , but not now she she has a few on the inside of her lips what else can I do

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. From the details that you have given, I'm not sure if Angel is on any medication for her hives, or if she has been seen by your veterinarian? Allergies to peanut butter are uncommon in dogs, but reactions to other things like insect bites, vaccines, or medications are not uncommon. It would be best to have her seen by your veterinarian, have her assessed, and get appropriate treatment. I hope that she is okay.

Please give me some help

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Bailey
Pit bull
10 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Itchy

My 10 month old dog was having a itching problem and was treated for mites and fleas. She got better and is still taking antihistamines. I’ve been giving it to her with crunchy peanut butter but her itching is still going and is balding in certain spots. Is it possible that the peanut butter is causing the allergic reaction?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Peanut butter allergies are quite uncommon, especially in young dogs. If Bailey is still itchy and losing hair, it would be a good idea to have her rechecked by your veterinarian to make sure that she doesn't need further treatment. I hope that all goes well for her.

I'm just a dog lover and I'd like to give a little input on what worked for my pitbull. He had the same symptoms. I tried everything!! Then I switched his food to Purina one and haven't had a problem since!!! My German Shepherd had to be on a grain free food and perfect!! I really hope this helps! Nothing like a sad doggy!! Poor guy!! Good luck!!

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Izzy
del jac
2 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Breathing Difficulty

I have a 2 month old shih tzu and I give her peanut butter for treat after she goes to potty, she seems to have breathing problems could this be from the peanut butter?

Dr. Michele King, DVM
Dr. Michele King, DVM
1397 Recommendations
It isn't likely that her breathing problems are from the peanut butter, although that is a bit of a high fat treat... ShihTzus have short noses, and can have some problems associated with that normal trait of the breed. Some of them will outgrow the problem, and some need to have corrective surgery to make them breath normally - it would be best to have her evaluated by a veterinarian, as they can examine her and determine whether her breathing is normal for her, or if she has a problem. I hope that all goes well for her!

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