Introduction

Your beloved pup has reached the ripe old age of 10. They have officially hit double digits and enjoyed a decade of life. Pretty impressive! Well what happens next? They sail into the canine golden years with style and grace. Dogs at this age are noticeably slower in their movements, and lounging around the house and napping are their favorite past times. Their faces are covered in white fur and they don’t have as much energy as they used to. But they are more devoted to you than ever. Read on to find out what else you can expect at this age. 

Growth and Development

Have you noticed thick patches of scaly skin on your dog’s elbows? Don’t worry, your pooch isn't mutating into some sort of canine reptile hybrid. They just have calluses. Since older dogs nap and lounge more than their younger peers, their elbows develop thick skin to protect the ulna from hard surfaces. Calluses are also common in large breeds. If your senior canine has a double coat or thick fur, they are less likely to get a callus. Normal calluses aren’t a cause for concern. But if the callus turns into a sore or ulcer, pack up your pooch and head to the vet. To help your pal stay callus free, buy them a comfy bed to rest in. In fact, an orthopedic bed may be just what your pooch needs to help soothe their aging joints anyway. But no matter how lush and cozy their bed is, sometimes a dog just wants to sprawl across the cool tile!

Health

At this age, many different health issues can begin to become apparent. Diabetes is a metabolic disease that usually rears its ugly head during a dog’s senior years. With insulin-resistance diabetes, the pup’s body isn’t effectively using insulin. Insulin-deficiency diabetes means the dog’s pancreas isn’t producing enough insulin, and is the type more commonly seen in canines. Be on the lookout for symptoms like excessive thirst, increasing bathroom breaks, weight loss, lack of energy, depression, and increased appetite. While any and all dogs can develop diabetes, some breeds are more susceptible, such as Poodles, Pugs, Miniature Schnauzers, and Samoyeds. If your furry friend exhibits any of these symptoms, talk with your vet. If diagnosed, your pooch needs to stay at a healthy weight and get plenty of exercise, and may need insulin injections, glucose monitoring, and possibly other medications. But it’s worth it to keep your beloved pet healthy and happy!

Training

As dogs age, their patience and tolerance for uncertainty, loud noises, and quick movement dwindles. So if your pack includes a senior dog and small children, trouble could be brewing. However, a little extra training for both the two legged and four legged children can go a long way. Teach the human kids how to respect your doggo’s personal space and make sure your pooch has their own quiet spot where they can find refuge when things get chaotic.
Toys
Toys

Soft Toys

Give your senior pal soft, plush toys.
Sleep
Sleep

Increased Naps

No doubt about it, older doggos love their naps!
Food
Food

Senior Food

Feed your pal a high quality senior kibble.
A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
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A FREE Walk For A Healthier Pup
Give your pup some extra love and fresh air with this free Wag! Walk
Book A Walk
*Valid only for first time customers