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What is Pooping in His Crate?

If your dog has been pooping in his crate, it may be a cause for alarm. The instinct to keep the den clean is natural in wild dogs, and the crate often becomes this den for domestic pet dogs. To understand why your dog may be inappropriately eliminating in his crate, take a look at some factors surrounding the behavior. The consistency of the stool can be a reflection of your dog’s health. Diarrhea can be a common symptom of many medical conditions. If your dog shows anxious behaviors in his crate, there may be behavioral issues that are causing the inappropriate elimination. Any symptoms concurrent with your dog pooping in his crate can give you and your vet important clues as to the cause of your dog’s behavior. While there are many reasons why your dog may be pooping in his crate, common ones include:

  • Potty training 
  • Crate is too big
  • Anxiety
  • Inflammatory bowel disease 
  • Infections
  • Muscle and nerve disease
  • Incontinence 
  • Trauma 
  • Medications

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Why Pooping in His Crate Occurs in Dogs

Reasons why your dog may be pooping in his crate relate to behavioral issues, physical limitations, or medical reasons that can cause your dog to be unable to hold it until he is let out of his crate. Often, conditions that cause diarrhea or a loss of bowel control can result in crate soiling.

Potty Training 

If your dog is still a puppy, he may not be completely potty trained. He may also be too young to be able to hold it for too long of a time. Puppies will need to relieve themselves much more often than adult dogs, and can even need to have a bathroom break as soon as every hour. On average, a two month old puppy can only hold it for about two hours at the most. As your puppy grows older, he will be able to extend that time, but it may be slow. Know that even an adult dog can have limitations, and may not be able to hold it through an eight to ten hour work day.

Crate is Too Big

Ensuring you have the proper size crate can also make a big difference. When choosing a crate, only allow enough room for your dog to be able to turn around in and lay with his legs out. This important detail will ensure that there isn’t enough room for him to poop and not lay in it. Dogs have a natural instinct not to soil where they rest, so use this instinct to your advantage, especially when training puppies, or retraining adults. 

Anxiety

A dog who suffers from separation anxiety may become quite anxious when you leave, a common time when he may be crated. He may whine, pant, and pace, but more importantly, he may become so distraught that he may poop right where he is. Your dog might also suffer from confinement anxiety, which could cause anxious behaviors when he is trapped in a confined space. 

Inflammatory Bowel Disease 

This is a chronic condition that affects the intestinal tract in some dogs. Due to several reasons, the intestinal lining is invaded by inflammatory cells, resulting in an allergic response that interferes with the ability to process and absorb nutrients from food. Common symptoms include episodes of diarrhea or vomiting, and sometimes, weight loss. Diet and bacterial proteins have both been identified as possible causes. 

Infections

Various infections can lead to digestive problems that can cause uncontrollable diarrhea. Parvovirus is a highly infectious virus that can cause severe abdominal pain, bloating, decreased appetite, vomiting, and often, bloody diarrhea. Many types of internal parasites and worms can also cause digestive disruptions, and can result in chronic diarrhea that can damage the muscles in the rectum. This can lead to a loss of full control in that area. Some of the infecting parasites can include roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, giardia, and coccidia. 

Muscle and Nerve Disease

There are various diseases that can affect the muscles or nerves, causing weakness and debilitation that can affect rectum function. Degenerative myelopathy involves a degeneration of the axons within the spinal cord, resulting in arthritic-like symptoms specifically seen in the hind end. Peripheral myopathy is a condition which causes nerve damage that inhibits sensations, thereby stopping your dog from knowing when he needs to defecate. Myasthenia gravis is a neuromuscular disease that is inherited or immune-mediated. This condition stops the muscles from being able to contract.

Incontinence

There are many medical conditions that can cause incontinence in dogs, especially those that involve a partial or complete paralysis of the hind end. Elderly dogs may also experience incontinence as a consequence of aging. 

Trauma 

Injury can occur from accidents, or from tumors that may have formed near the rectum. These kinds of trauma may damage sphincter control and make it difficult for your dog to control his elimination.

Medications 

Certain medications can cause disturbances in elimination. If you have noticed the behavior since your dog has been taking a specific drug, talk with your veterinarian about the possible side effects and if that may be causing problems in your dog.

What to do if your Dog is Pooping in His Crate

To correctly diagnose why your dog is pooping in his crate, your vet will first look at the age of your dog, and ask pointed questions about his potty training and any concurrent symptoms. It is important to determine if the inappropriate elimination is a behavioral or medical issue. Your veterinarian will perform a physical exam, which will include checking the sphincter muscles, and run many tests to determine if there is a medical reason behind the behavior. Bring a fresh stool sample for testing if you can. Blood tests, a urinalysis and fecal testing can provide valuable information that can lead to a diagnosis. These tests can often diagnose various infections, and evaluate your dog’s internal health. X-rays, MRIs, or a myelography can detect tumors, muscle and nerve diseases, and evidence of any other serious trauma. Inflammatory bowel disease may need an intestinal biopsy for a definitive diagnosis. 

If medical reasons are ruled out, then behavioral issues will be examined. Does your dog become anxious in confined places? Does he get nervous and vocal when you get ready to leave the house? Often, separation anxiety can be diagnosed if your dog only poops in his crate when you are gone. Monitoring his behavior can give you important clues as to why he may be anxious in his crate.

Once the reason has been determined, a treatment plan will be discussed with your vet that is specific to your dog’s condition. Infections can be treated with appropriate antibiotics and anti-parasitics. Any medications that may be causing elimination problems will be immediately discontinued. Trauma will be evaluated and corrected as needed, such as tumor removal or reconstructive surgery. If incontinence in your older dog is the issue, diapers and more frequent trips outside may help. Dietary changes can sometimes decrease the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. While there are not any drugs that can specifically treat a parvovirus infection, supportive care is given to aid in the body’s natural recovery. Physical therapy exercises and pain medication is often prescribed to manage diseases such as degenerative myelopathy that have no cure. 

If your dog is still a puppy, or just needs re-training, use positive training techniques to teach your dog the appropriate place to eliminate. Use patience, consistency, and compassion to ensure that your dog receives the correct message and learns that the crate is not his bathroom. Anxiety can be treated through behavioral modification and counterconditioning. Try leaving toys and treats with your dog when you lock him in his crate so that he will associate good things with time in his crate, thereby lessening his anxiety. Be sure you have an appropriately sized crate that discourages elimination. Always remember that not all dogs are physically the same, and while some can hold their stool for a very long time, other dogs may need to go out more often.

Prevention of Pooping in His Crate

It may be impossible to predict when accidents, tumors, or certain medical conditions can occur, but there are other ways you can prevent this behavior. Be sure to keep your dog on a monthly preventative treatment to protect him from parasitic infections. Use positive reinforcement right away with your puppy to teach potty training, and expose him to lots of new people, animals, and places to encourage confidence and lessen the chance of anxious tendencies. Use crate training techniques to teach your dog that the crate is a safe place to be. 

Cost of Pooping in His Crate

The cost of treating inappropriate defecation in the crate can range considerably, and will depend on the reason behind the behavior. The loss of bowel control can be rather expensive, ranging up to $5000. Inflammatory bowel disease can average $2800, while degenerative myelopathy can be slightly less at $1800. Infections can range up to $1000, with parvovirus averaging $700 and intestinal parasites around $300. Behavioral issues involving anxiety can range from $200 to $1500.

Pooping in His Crate Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

Hank
Labrador
7 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Poor Stool Control

My dog Hank just started recently pooping in his crate. It happened a few times spread out through the month but then it just started getting worse, he would have diarrhea and then he would lay in it. He had surgery 2 or 3 weeks ago that envoled his stomach, but we had are local vet check to make sure everything was ok at the 2 week check up. There was nothing abnormal. During the day he is happy and running around. We are scared and losing hope, please help!

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
237 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. I'm not sure what kind of surgery he had, but the diarrhea may be a result of whatever was wrong with him at that time - your veterinarian may have checked his incisions, hydration, and general health and thought that everything was okay, but that isn't normal behavior post-op, and may be related. It would be a good idea to have another recheck, let your veterinarian know what he is doing, and make sure that he doesn't need any treatments that might help resolve these problems. I hope that everything goes well for him.

Hi I didn’t know where to comment Just did it here hello I have a 1year 2 months husky He is with us since 1 month and I keep him in the yard he had a crate and we didn’t teach him to not poop here he just pooped everytime and In my school break I desided to make him a new crate for 6 days he didn’t poop here I take him out of his crate at morning at 8am and when I give him food today I started the school and when I came home he was just doing it and I cannot stop It was 12:15 am I give him food at 12:40 and he pooped on the yard I am to worried about yesterday what he gonna do please give me some advices what to do

Hi I didn’t know where to comment Just did it here hello I have a 1year 2 months husky He is with us since 1 month and I keep him in the yard he had a crate and we didn’t teach him to not poop here he just pooped everytime and In my school break I desided to make him a new crate for 6 days he didn’t poop here I take him out of his crate at morning at 8am and when I give him food today I started the school and when I came home he was just doing it and I cannot stop It was 12:15 am I give him food at 12:40 and he pooped on the yard I am to worried about yesterday what he gonna do please give me some advices what to do

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Hershey
Lab mix
1 Year
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

Diarrhea

Medication Used

none

The past three nights, our dog- a 13 month old lab mix we rescued from the pound about 7 months ago- began pooping in the kennel at night. There is no blood or worms in the stool that we can see, but it could be classified as diarrhea. She still has lots of energy and an appetite, but she also has a bit of a hacking cough. She stays in the fence in the backyard during the day and only comes inside to sleep at night. She has been boarded in the last 10 Days, and she has gotten out of the fence at home too. Suggestions on how to treat the diarrhea?

Michele King
Dr. Michele King, DVM
237 Recommendations
Thank you for your email. Since she has had a few times where she may have eaten something that did not agree with her, when she escaped from the fence or while she was boarding, it would be best to have her seen by your veterinarian, have them check for parasites in her fecal sample (they look for the eggs, not the adult parasites), and get an anti-diarrheal medication if she needs one. If she wasn't vaccinated against kennel cough, she may have picked up that infection at the boarding kennel, and your vet can examine her for that and make sure that she is okay, as well. I hope that she is okay!

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Joba
Miniature Pinscher
9 Years
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Separation Anxiety

I have a 9yr old male min pin. Ever since he was a puppy he has peed and pooped in his crate. It does not seem to bother him. When we are home he will tell us when he needs to go go outside to do his buisness. He gets praised and rewarded. He knows he is not suppose to go in the house. We have been cleaning up after him for 9 yrs. I know he has separation anxiety and we have tried medication and nothing helps. We are are at our whits end. Please help!!!!!

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
Unfortunately if Joba hasn’t picked up crate training by now, he may never will; if he is able to hold himself whilst you are at home, we can pretty much rule out a medical issue as the problem would be consistent. If (most likely) the problem is behavioural, then it is a case of stepping up training; instead of punishing him for accidents in his crate try ignoring him as this may have a more profound effect. I am sure you’ve brought this up with your Veterinarian during your checkups, so I cannot think of anything else which may be of benefit. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Rocky
German Shepherd Dog
4 Months
Moderate condition
0 found helpful
Moderate condition

We rescued a German Shepherd puppy at about 13 weeks old and he is now 16 weeks. He knows he should be going to the bathroom outside as he will go to the back door when he is free around the house. The problem is he gives us no warning. No barking, whining or even pawing at the door like the 2.5 year GSD mix we also have does. He continues to have accidents in his kennel overnight though. It started out as just pee but the last couple times it was poop. He doesn't have an accident every night as he had gone 5 days without an accident. We would love if he would just bark during the night to have us get up and let him out.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
I understand your frustration, but I don’t know of a way to teach your dog to bark when he is in his crate when he needs to do his business; it is important to take him out late to make sure he did his business and try to time feeding so that he won’t defecate during the night. I cannot offer any further advice on this. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

My Havanese is 5 months old and will pee and poop in his crate. And lay in it. I try to wake up earlier or listen for when he stirs and it doesn't help. I've slept on the couch to listen, nothing. Any advice?

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Aisha
Boxer
2
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

I have a 2 year old boxer and she spends her day in her crate while I'm out. She has recently started pooping in her crate daily and will walk all over it. She never used to do this, but now it's an everyday thing. She knows she did something wrong, but she still continues to do it. I'm thinking it's behavioral, but I don't know how to stop it. We have tried to no longer feed her in the evening (just the mornings), but that's also not working. She is crated next to our other 4 year old boxer (seperate crate) and he never messes in his crate. Please help!

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
For behavioural issues, there is no simple one fits all solution; before you settle on behavioural you should have your Veterinarian check Aisha over to rule out other causes of faecal incontinence like loss of anal tone among others. If it is behavioural, you need to show disapproval when she defecates in the crate and praise her when she defecates where she is supposed to; no quick fixes for behaviour. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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chloe
miniture goldendoodle
13 Weeks
Moderate condition
1 found helpful
Moderate condition

Has Symptoms

panting, whining, crying

Hi, I got Chloe (a 13 week old miniture goldendoodle) 3 days ago. I want her to be crate trained while I am at work during the day. As she is still a puppy, how can I make her stop having "accidents" in her crate whenever I leave the house or whenever I put her to sleep? She is good at relieving herself outside. She doesn't have accidents on her bed, she does go on the pee pad that's in her crate but then with the panting, it ends up going on her bed. Puppy and separation anxiety?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
Chloe is young and three days in your home, the whole experience is new for her; you should show her disapproval when she poops in the crate and make a fuss of her when she goes outside. Most likely separation anxiety is the cause and it just needs time to work itself out; there is no secret to crate training, just repetition. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Our 5 month old Bully was completely house trained and had no problems asking for the door. Now suddenly over the last 2-3 days he has been pooping non stop in his crate.

We had him on kibble originally, then switched to raw chicken and bone cubes for about a month. We switched him back to Taste Of The Wild kibble because we read that on raw he could have ecoli or samonila in his mouth and that is unacceptable with us because we have a baby in the house and didn’t want him licking him.

What is causing his pooping behaviour????

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Snicker
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
1 Year
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Hi, my 1 year old pup has started pooing in her cage again recently, for the past three weeks she’s pooed in her cage pretty much every night. She feels guilty in the morning, she knows it wrong. She goes out into the garden every night before bed but won’t do anything. Last night she also peed in her cage which she hasn’t done since being a tiny pup. We’ve tried alsort, she only has dog food, eating at certain times, punishing her and rewarding her for going outside etc, we can’t figure out why. We’ve been to the vets and he hasn’t said anything is wrong. Are we missing something? Should I try a different vet? Thanks

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
There are a few causes for defecating in the crate which may be medical (she can’t hold it), behavioural or due to another factor like fear; you are already doing the right things - punishing her, rewarding when defecating outside etc… I do not think you are missing anything and more often than not these issues come down to a behavioural problem; is there anything new in your home? Have you moved the crate? Friends or family visiting? Try to think of any possible changes that may have an impact on Snicker’s bathroom habits. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Remi
Shih-Tzu
5 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

I just brought home my 5 month old Shi-Chon puppy this weekend. I know I have not had him long at all- only 2 days, but I have found feces in his crate now 4 times. And each time he steps in it, which results in a bath. He is usually going potty outside when I take him, but not always. And he never goes around the house- only the crate and outside. I know I just got him, but I want to stop this behavior ASAP before it becomes anymore habitual. I am trying really hard taking him outside frequently, rewarding with treats, and his crate is the correct size for his body. Please help stop this before it continues!

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
You need to show Remi disapproval when he defecates in his crate, punishment is best (don’t hit him or put his face in it) but show disapproval; when he defecates outdoors, make a big fuss of him and take the time for him to know he did well. I know it is obvious and you are probably doing this already, but he may be a little stressed in his new home; keep this up with rewarding him for defecating outside and he should get on track. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

Hi, my 1 year old pup has started pooing in her cage again recently, for the past three weeks she’s pooed in her cage pretty much every night. She feels guilty in the morning, she knows it wronge. She goes out into the garden every night before bed but won’t do anything. Last night she also peed in her cage which she hasn’t done since being a tiny pup. We’ve tried alsort, she only has dog food, eating at certain times, punishing her and rewarding her for going outside etc, we can’t figure out why. We’ve been to the vets and he hasn’t said anything is wrong. Are we missing something? Should I try a different vet? Thanks

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Mya
Boxer
12
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Weight Loss
Thirsty
Loose stools,

Why does my dog all of a sudden start pooping in her crate? She has never done this before and does not do it at night, just during the day when she is crated. She also stay thirsty constantly.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
Defecating in the crate may be a medical condition, but more frequently it is behavioural and may be down to anxiety; there is no quick fix for it and you need to make sure that there is nothing stressing Mya whilst she is in the crate. Sometimes moving the crate to a different area or observing (by camera) the behaviour in the crate you may start to understand triggers which may be causing this. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Murphy
Shih-Poo
3 Years
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Our dog is 3 years old and has been having accidents in the house when we are not home or through the night. He had a kennel for the first year we had him and we took him out for last year. For the first half of the year he was fine and rarely had accidents. Then he started having them in the house frequently enough. We recently got him another kennel to try to solve this problem and the first few days he was fine but he started pooping in the kennel and then lying in it. I would believe this is due to separation anxiety but he rarely also poops in the house when we are home and after he has already been out. What can we do to fix this problem?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
It is important to determine whether this is a behavioural problem down to anxiety or a medical problem with a loss of continence; I would first check with your Veterinarian to make sure that there isn’t anything medically going on since you’ve mentioned that he will defecate indoors after being out, this may indicate that he is unaware that he needs to defecate. Other than that, if he comes back with a clean bill of health you just need to reinforce training again. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Ryder
Malti-Poo
1 Year
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Pooping in crate

I have a 1.5 year old mini poodle mix who i recused. He poops whenever I leave him alone, mostly in the crate. He does not have accidents any other time. His crate is the correct size but he poops then lays in it. I’m at my wits end with this as I have to clean feces out of his fur everyday as well as his crate. I know this is anxiety as he doesn’t let me out his sight when out of the crate. He also isn’t treat or food motivated so I’m struggling to get him to associate the crate with positive things

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
These types of ‘accidents’ in the crate are difficult to control as Ryder is most likely perfectly healthy but from anxiety is getting the better of him when he cannot see you. I would try to put him in the crate, leave for thirty seconds and then go back making a fuss of him if he didn’t defecate and punishing him if he did; then over time build from thirty seconds to a minute etc… to try to associate the crate with something positive. Other than that I would recommend discussing with a Behaviourist about Ryder’s accidents in the crate. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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sammy
Labradoodle
18 Weeks
Mild condition
1 found helpful
Mild condition

We have had sammy for 6 weeks. He is a 18 week old labradoodle. He hasn't always been really good in his crate and normally goes to bed on a night about 10 and wakes at 6 to go to the bathroom. Two nights ago he began to eliminate in his crate. It appeared he had diarrhea but then again tonight he eliminated in his crate and his stool was normal! He has been barking a lot. Im a little concerned as this change in behavior has just started. We had a house guest last week who left three nights ago. Could this have something to do with it?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
Defecating in the crate may be caused by many different causes which may include behavioural issues, stress, infections, bowel disease, lack of training among other issues. There is no one way to stop defecating in the crate as the primary cause would need to be identified; behavioural issues can be overcome using discipline techniques. Stress may have been caused by a house guest, just keep an eye on the issue but if it continues a visit to your Veterinarian may be needed to rule out any medical causes. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Jakey
Cairn Terrier
11 Weeks
Fair condition
0 found helpful
Fair condition

Has Symptoms

Eliminting in his crate

Pooping in crate suddenly. I have an eleven week old puppy who has a crate with plenty of room to have a bed and newspapers and a feeding area. He has not used the crate for anything other than feeding, choosing to sleep elsewhere. Suddenly he eliminated on the bedding in the crate and has done it again. Should I try removing the crate?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
The issue may be a loss of bowel control or may be due to another issue; it is important to determine whether this is a behavioural issue or a medical issue. Make sure that Jakey is up to date with his worm treatments and make sure he has opportunity to defecate outside. If the problem continues you should visit your Veterinarian to see if there is a medical problem. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Pepper
Miniature Schnauzer
5 Months
Serious condition
0 found helpful
Serious condition

Has Symptoms

Peeing in crate
Pooping in crate

Medication Used

Liver prescription diet

My 5month old puppy has a liver shunt, but does pretty well with being home. She knows to use doggy bells to go outside, but when we put her in the crate in the day time even for just an hour she will pee in it. Lately she has been pooping in her crate and eating it. I'm pretty sure she's eating it because I see poo marks in her bed and blanket, but no stool. We do leave for work for up to 3hrs. Like I said when we are home she doesn't pee or poo in the house.
She also doesn't do it at night when she sleeps in her crate.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
There is no easy answer to stop a dog from defecating in the crate; it may be that you need to adjust his toilet time, it may be a behavioural issue or a medical issue. You should speak with your Veterinarian to make sure that the cause isn’t a medical issue, if it isn’t then changing his toilet time and try catching her defecating and punishing her may help too. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Lola
Newfoundland
17 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

Has Symptoms

Loose Bowel Movements

I have a 17 month old Newfoundland. She is crate trained, but for the last several days she's been pooping in her crate in the middle of the night & it's runny. I haven't changed her diet, & I've taken her out to potty more than our normal routine but she still does it. Does she need to be seen?

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
It is possible that Lola has picked up a simple tummy bug causing diarrhoea and just like with humans, if the diarrhoea is coming it is going to come. Since it has been around a week, I would recommend that you speak with your Veterinarian as any possible infection may need to be treated; try to ensure that Lola is hydrated and also give some plain canned pumpkin as it may help to firm up her stool. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

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Max
Maltipoo
7 Months
Mild condition
0 found helpful
Mild condition

I've had max for about a month now and he has never eliminated in his crate. All of a sudden he poops in his crate and it's running. Nothing really changed. Our routine is the same so I can't think of anything. He does cry and bark when we leave but he always does that. Not sure if he's just sick and can't hold it or if I should be concerned. We went to the vet Sunday for a well check up and everything was fine. Monday is when he started. Should I take another trip to the vet? He's still eating and drinking so I'm hoping it's just an upset stomach.

Callum Turner
Dr. Callum Turner, DVM
1805 Recommendations
It is possible Max has a little stomach bug or irritation which has caused some diarrhoea which he couldn’t hold; there are infectious pathogens everywhere and a dog may pick up a small infection (younger dogs are more likely to be affected), have a little diarrhoea and be alright the next day. If the problem continues and you are noticing more runny stools or are generally concerned a trip to your Veterinarian wouldn’t hurt. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

We just got a new pug puppy. She's 10 weeks old right now. We took her home 2 weeks ago, and she magically knew to run and pee and poo on the pads we had by the door. Since it's so cold out we are using pads for training right now. She also can hold it for a really long time for a puppy, several hours. When she's in the middle of playing, she'll just run over to the pad and go. But, we have a problem with the crate. Pretty much as soon as we put her in it, and step away, she poops. And then, like a monkey, she flings it all over the place. If we stand next to the crate till she goes asleep, she's fine.. but if she sees us leave, all bets are off. She screams and howls and jumps around, and then poops. Sometimes she poops the very second we step out of view. I sure it's got to be some kind of separation anxiety... but how do we correct it? If we have leave the house for a couple of hours, we don't want her rolling around in her poo. What can we do?

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