Natural Wart Remedies in Dogs

Natural Wart Remedies in Dogs - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention
7 Veterinary Answers

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Natural Wart Remedies in Dogs - Conditions Treated, Procedure, Efficacy, Recovery, Cost, Considerations, Prevention

Prepare for unexpected vet bills

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What are Natural Wart Remedies?

There are a number of natural remedies that can be used to treat papillomas (warts) in dogs. Papillomas are benign groups of abnormal cells, caused by the papillomavirus. They cause cauliflower-like skin and lesions around the mouth. The goal of natural remedies in response to dog warts is to shrink the growth until it is fully healed. They are usually used as a primary measure up until the case becomes severe, at which point medical intervention may be necessary. These remedies can be administered by the dog’s owner. 

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Natural Wart Remedies Procedure in Dogs

There are two popular natural remedies to use as a response to papillomas. The first is the application of Vitamin E. The second is the use of a homeopathic remedy called Thuja. It is important to have the papilloma diagnosed by a veterinarian to ensure it is not a tumour or another type of problem. 

To use Vitamin E:

  • Puncture a Vitamin E capsule
  • Apply the capsule contents directly to the papilloma
  • Apply twice a day, for two to three weeks until the papilloma has healed

To use Thuja pellets:

  • Give six to ten pellets daily, orally, and 20 minutes before meal time
  • Must be put directly in the mouth and not the throat (so it can be absorbed my mucus membranes)
  • Repeat process every day for 1 week.
  • Give this medication under the advice of your veterinarian.  
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Efficacy of Natural Wart Remedies in Dogs

Due to the natural and holistic nature of these treatments, there is not enough conclusive evidence to determine precisely how effective they are. But, many owners report both methods to be very effective in reducing the size of the wart until elimination, in just a few weeks. Whether the growths would shrink in size without treatment regardless is unknown.  The effects are not permanent, and dogs may develop new papillomas as they age. Remedies might be effective in tackling existing papillomas, but will not permanently cure the dog of future papillomas. 

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Natural Wart Remedies Recovery in Dogs

Due to the non-invasive nature of these natural remedies, the dog will not need any time to recover from the treatments. An owner should see signs of improvement within a week, seen as a reduction of the size of the  papilloma. Depending on the size of the growth, an owner could typically expect the papilloma to be completely healed after one month. There should be no need for a repeat visit to the veterinarian unless the papilloma has grown or changed. The only ongoing maintenance required of the owners is to check for new papillomas and get them diagnosed to ensure they are not tumors. 

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Cost of Natural Wart Remedies in Dogs

Both natural remedies come with minimal costs. A box of 60 vitamin E capsules can be purchased for just a few dollars. A pack of 60 Thuja pellets can be bought for $10. Price could vary if you had a number of papillomas to treat, but both natural treatment options are extremely cost effective. 

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Dog Natural Wart Remedies Considerations

While a dog may get more papillomas in the future, this can often not be preventedl. Natural remedies tend to be generally safe for the dog, but should always be given under the advice of a veterinarian. They can be effective in reducing the size of the papilloma until it is completely gone. It is worth considering that papillomas, unless extremely severe, are painless and harmless to your dog. So these remedies offer a natural solution to a naturally occurring problem.

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Natural Wart Remedies Prevention in Dogs

Due to the naturally occurring nature of papillomas, there are limited ways to prevent them. Dog papillomas can be contagious, so keeping them away from susceptible dogs is one measure to take, especially if your dog’s immune system is weak. Avoid taking them to densely populated canine areas, such as kennels and dog parks. This will have some preventative effect, but will not wholly prevent them. 

Use of corticosteroids should be kept to a minimum, as long term steroid use can weaken the immune system, reducing the dog’s ability to fight off any infection, such as the papillomavirus. One proactive measure owners can take is to feed them a healthy balanced diet to ensure the dog’s immune system is as strong as possible and has the best chances of fighting off any infection. Yet even this will only prevent papillomas to a limited extent. 

Ensuring a strong immune system, avoiding overuse of steroids, and keeping your dog away from other dogs when he is weak or ill, are currently the most effective measures an owner can take to prevent papilloma warts. There is progress on a papilloma virus vaccine-- that may be the most effective preventative measure to keep an eye out for. 

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Natural Wart Remedies Questions and Advice from Veterinary Professionals

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Ask a Vet

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Titus

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Australian Shepherd

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14 Months

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

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0 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Mild severity

Has Symptoms

Warts

I recently noticed that my 1 year old Australian Shepherd had about 10 small white lumps on his lips and gums. They're pretty small, the largest being the size of coriander seed. I believe they are oral papilloma and after a phone conversation with my vet she advised I keep an eye on them and if they seem to cause him pain or discomfort while eating that I should schedule an appointment at that time (he already has an appt in a month). She also recommended I find a homeopathic vet to consult for more cost effective remedies. Should I utilize the method of breaking a vitamin e capsule on the warts? Can I use any vitamin e or do I need to find vitamins specific to dogs?

Aug. 20, 2018

Titus' Owner

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Dr. Michele K. DVM

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0 Recommendations

If Titus is affected by papillomavirus, that tends to be a self-limiting disease, and should resolve on its' own without treatment. I am not familiar with Vitamin E being effective for that problem, and anything that you put on the lesions is going to end up being licked off. If they are growing in size of number, then you should make an appointment with your veterinarian, but those often spontaneously resolve over a few weeks.

Aug. 20, 2018

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Lily

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German Shepherd

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8 Months

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

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1 found helpful

pill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filledpill-rating-filled

Moderate severity

Has Symptoms

Wart

My 8 month old dog has had a wart on her chin for the past month or so. I have started putting vitamin c on it, however two different times it seems to change to a dark red/ black color and sometimes looks like it might be irritated from the vitamin e or her hitting it on something? Should I go to the vet or is it most likely that she’s irritating it while playing? Is the change is color associated with this, or is the vitamin e possibly breaking it down? Thanks for your advice!

July 5, 2018

Lily's Owner

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1 Recommendations

You should have your Veterinarian examine the lump to confirm whether or not it is a wart, especially if there are colour changes. Trauma may cause some bleeding under the skin which may change the appearance of the lump; but again your Veterinarian should check it to be on the safe side. Regards Dr Callum Turner DVM

July 5, 2018

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