Alaskan Malamute

75-100 lbs
23-26"
Alaska
Mal, Mally

The Alaskan Malamute is the largest Arctic sled dog and got its name from the area it originated and the tribe it lived with, the Mahlemuts. It is a basal breed that originated 4,000 years ago with the Inuit Tribe in Alaska. Although they were originally bred for hunting large game such as polar bears and seals, now they are used for sled pulling and as companion pets. They are a healthy breed, living about 12 years on average, although they do have some congenital conditions such as hip dysplasia and cataracts. With their double-coat, they are able to withstand wet and cold climates. In fact, they actually prefer the cooler weather. Alaskan Malamutes are usually white with gray, red, or black shading and have a wolf-like appearance although their expression is softer.

Purpose
heavy sled pulling, large game hunting
Date of Origin
ancient times
Ancestry
spitz

Alaskan Malamute Health

Sketch of Alaskan Malamute
Average Size
Male Alaskan Malamute size stats
Height: 25-28 inches Weight: 85-125 lbs
Female Alaskan Malamute size stats
Height: 23-26 inches Weight: 75-100 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Canine Hip Dysplasia
  • Chondrodysplasia (Chd)
Minor Concerns
  • Cataracts
  • Glaucoma
  • Skin Problems
  • Diabetes
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Hip
  • Blood
  • Chd Clear Rating

Alaskan Malamute Breed History

Named after the Innuit Tribe, Mahlemuts, this breed was born to work and play in the snow. They descended from the Eskimo dogs of Greenland, Siberian Huskies, and the Russian Samoyed over 4,500 years ago. At the time, the Mahlemuts used the Alaskan Malamutes as hunting dogs to help them hunt polar bears and seals and were used as sled dogs as well. Sometime during the 1700s, explorers were impressed by the Alaskan Malamutes for their strength and affection and this increased the breed’s popularity a great deal. During the gold rush of 1896, the miners started using the dogs in weight-pulling competitions for entertainment. At that time, Alaskan Malamutes were bred with other breeds to make them faster and to increase the number of dogs to race. This caused the breed to be diminished and it took until the 1920s for breeders to start trying to purify the breed again, the Alaskan Malamute as it is today being the result. In 1933, several Alaskan Malamutes were used to help Richard Byrd in his Antarctic expedition. During World War II, these dogs were used as working dogs alongside the soldiers in battle. The Alaskan Malamute is the 59th most popular breed in the United States and was officially recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1935. The breed was featured on a stamp issued by the United States postal service in 1984 and in several other countries. They became so popular in Alaska that it was named the official state dog of Alaska in 2010. This was all due to a campaign by a group of school children.

Alaskan Malamute Breed Appearance

The Alaskan Malamute is seen in nine different colors which include agouti and white, black and white, blue and white, gray and white, red and white, sable and white, seal and white, silver and white, and white. Some have black markings or a gray mask. They have a muscular and powerful body with a proud stance, alert eyes, and keep their head held high. The Alaskan Malamute has a broad head, triangular ears, a bulky muzzle, strong legs, and a furry tail curled over its back. They have a deep chest and powerful shoulders for strength and stamina. Their coat is thick and double layered for protection from the elements, which is why the Alaskan Malamute loves the cold weather so much. This is a large breed that can grow to over 100 pounds so they are able to withstand pulling heavy loads in extreme temperatures. They have dark brown eyes, although some are blue-eyed, and they are almond shaped.

Appearance of Alaskan Malamute
Eye Color Possibilities
blue Alaskan Malamute eyes
Blue
hazel Alaskan Malamute eyes
Hazel
brown Alaskan Malamute eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Alaskan Malamute nose
Black
brown Alaskan Malamute nose
Brown
Coat Color Possibilities
black Alaskan Malamute coat
Black
gray Alaskan Malamute coat
Gray
brown Alaskan Malamute coat
Brown
red Alaskan Malamute coat
Red
blue Alaskan Malamute coat
Blue
silver Alaskan Malamute coat
Silver
sable Alaskan Malamute coat
Sable
white Alaskan Malamute coat
White
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Alaskan Malamute straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Alaskan Malamute Breed Maintenance

The Alaskan Malamute sheds heavily twice a year and to keep their coat beautiful they need lots of grooming. This breed needs daily brushing with an oval pin brush and metal comb. It is important to brush under their arms and neck and check for mats, which can cause infection. Bathing should be done once every couple of months and you can have them groomed professionally several times a year. Their nails should be trimmed with a veterinary approved nail clipper or grinder once a month. Ears need to be cleaned weekly for wax, dirt, and other foreign materials and tooth brushing daily is recommended. The Alaskan Malamute is a dog with plenty of energy so you need to be ready to give your dog lots of exercise such as walking or jogging. A trip to the dog park can be fun as well since this breed gets along well with others. Apartments are not recommended for this large and energetic breed and they need a large yard to play in. However, they do like to dig holes so you should provide an area where it is safe for your dog to dig.
Brushes for Alaskan Malamute
Pin Brush
Slicker Brush
Deshedder
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Alaskan Malamute requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Alaskan Malamute Temperament

The Alaskan Malamute is a very affectionate pet that loves and protects the family. They even like children and will play with them for hours if allowed to. They need a lot of mental and physical stimulation to keep them from getting bored. Cats and other small animals are seen as prey unless you train your dog not to hunt them. They are very loyal and courageous but can be strong-willed and stubborn at times. This breed is easily trained and is very quick to learn. They need attention and exercise with both indoor and outdoor play daily. If they are left alone too long or get bored, they are likely to get into trouble by chewing up furniture or digging holes in the yard. Barking is usually not a concern but they tend to howl if they hear a siren or other dogs howling. They are also vocal with their owners so do not be surprised if your Alaskan Malamute seems to be talking to you

Alaskan Malamute Activity Requirements

The Alaskan Malamute thrives when they are put to work pulling a load or given a great deal of space to roam and explore, but they also enjoy the companionship of a family. This makes them the perfect addition to a family that likes to include their dog in outdoor adventure. Rest after play is welcomed also, but without ample exercise, your Mally may become frustrated and destructive, with a tendency to howl. Allowing him supervised back yard time is wise as well; however, if left unattended, an unplanned escape may take place.
Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
10 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
90 minutes

Alaskan Malamute Popularity

Popularity ranking
#59
Popular Hybrids
Malanees
Alaskan Malamute
Great Pyrenees
Malanees
Mally Foxhound
Alaskan Malamute
Foxhound
Mally Foxhound
Alaskan Goldenmute
Alaskan Malamute
Golden Retriever
Alaskan Goldenmute
Alaskan Malador
Alaskan Malamute
Labrador Retriever
Alaskan Malador

Alaskan Malamute Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
3 cups
Daily Cost
$2.00 - $2.25
Monthly Cost
$60.00 - $67.50

Alaskan Malamute Height & Weight

6 Months
Sketch of Alaskan Malamute at six months
Male Alaskan Malamute size stats at six months
Height: 23 inches Weight: 52 lbs
Female Alaskan Malamute size stats at six months
Height: 21 inches Weight: 45 lbs
12 Months
Sketch of Alaskan Malamute at 12 months
Male Alaskan Malamute size stats at 12 months
Height: 25 inches Weight: 70 lbs
Female Alaskan Malamute size stats at 12 months
Height: 23 inches Weight: 60 lbs
18 Months
Sketch of Alaskan Malamute at 18 months
Male Alaskan Malamute size stats at 18 months
Height: 27 inches Weight: 102 lbs
Female Alaskan Malamute size stats at 18 months
Height: 25 inches Weight: 85 lbs

Top Alaskan Malamute Breeders

Check out who made our list for the most reputable Alaskan Malamute breeders of 2018.
Top Alaskan Malamute breeder Northern Lite Alaskan Malamutes
Northern Lite Alaskan Malamutes
Burton, Ohio
Top Alaskan Malamute breeder Kaviak Alaskan Malamutes
Kaviak Alaskan Malamutes
Louisburg, Kansas
Top Alaskan Malamute breeder Aquila Kennels
Aquila Kennels
Foxworth, Mississippi
Top Alaskan Malamute breeder Snow Pack Alaskan Malamutes of the Rockies
Snow Pack Alaskan Malamutes of the Rockies
Fairplay, Colorado
Top Alaskan Malamute breeder Summit Alaskan Malamutes
Summit Alaskan Malamutes
Pinetop, Arizona
Top Alaskan Malamute breeder October Kies
October Kies
Topeka, Kansas
Top Alaskan Malamute breeder Willow Creek Malamutes
Willow Creek Malamutes
Shelton, Washington
Top Alaskan Malamute breeder Kingfisher's Alaskan Malumute
Kingfisher's Alaskan Malumute
Big Lake, Alaska
Top Alaskan Malamute breeder Powder Hounds Malamutes
Powder Hounds Malamutes
Jefferson, Wisconsin
Top Alaskan Malamute breeder Kalamals
Kalamals
Blacksburg, Virginia

Alaskan Malamute Owner Experiences

Willow
1 Year
2 People
House
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Chasing eachother
Walk
Playing Ball
My malamute unfortunately is very shy around some people, mostly men. But she loves kids!! She also will love on anyone she knows of finds friendly. She’s a big baby, loves to be cuddled and loves her belly rubbed. We had problems at first with food aggression, but it is MUCH better now than what it was!! She’s a very spoiled girl, and loves playing outside in her huge yard with her brother and sister.
4 months, 2 weeks ago
2 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
howling
Running
Playing in leaves
Chasing sticks
Walking
The Malamute I walked a 95 pound ball of fluff who was VERY excitable and absolutely LOVED to be outside. He's super friendly to everyone and will almost knock you over when you walk in the door. You have to walk him with two hands on the leash the whole time, and he pulls hard. He is always on a mission. He sniffs out everything and is very curious. Super fluffy and cute and lovable, but also incredibly stubborn. He gets set on going a certain way and is not responsive to commands or attempts to go a different way. He also loves leaves (rolling in them, laying in piles of them, carrying them around in his mouth, etc.) and sometimes a leaf is the only way to distract him or get him to go where you want. Definitely a dog that needs a lot of attention and exercise and some good, consistent training.
11 months, 2 weeks ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Playing in the snow
Herding
High Five
Tracking
Hike
Run
I have worked in canine behavioral evaluations and as an adoptions councilor matching prospective family with shelter dogs to create forever homes. Each breed has their own innate natural instincts, which are brought out through environment, interactions and experience. Professionally, I have walked 4 Alaskan Malamutes, and have evaluated the temperaments of numerous cockers as an adoptions councilor. Alaskan Malamutes are energetic, insanely smart and stubborn in the most silly ways! Alaskan Malamutes were bred to sustain a high energy level for extended amounts of time, and to make decisions independent of their owners. This means you have a dog that is smart and independent, and if they feel you don't know what you are doing, the are more than capable of taking control! Alaskan Malamutes need consistent commands, and clear expectations. They know what you want, so no need to dumb things down, they are probably already ten steps ahead of you. Care needs to be taken to avoid becoming impatient or frustrated, he can sense it, and will doubt your ability to be leader. Help the Malamute to bond with you by approaching in a respectful and friendly manner; he loves affection, and wants to be friends with everyone! Do not allow him to jump on you, his weight can take down the biggest of us, and poses a hazard to children and the elderly. Discourage jumping by raising your knee to block his path while saying "No jump.", and immediately disengage any attention. Turn to your side and stop talking. When he is sitting, or just down on the ground, engage him again with tons of praise. Do not harness the leash until he is calm-ish. He is trying to contain massive amounts of energy, so give him the benefit of the doubt! It is likely the Malamute will be a puller, he was designed to pull sleds of course! Inspect his harness and leash with care, and make sure everything fits well. When exiting the house, start with the leash brought up short, so he is walking right next to you. This will prevent you (hopefully) from being launched into the air if he decides to pull! You may find the Malamute over exaggerating your commands or doing the opposite, you tug left, he goes right. You say stop, he melts to the ground and refuses to move. I told you he's smart! It is a test. He wants to be sure you really have what it takes to be in charge. Hold fast to your request, and don't bother pulling. He is an immovable rock. Sweet talk and an owner approved treat is your best bet. To get the most out of his walk, he will likely need to go fast, and go far. Alaskan Malamutes heat up fast, so pay attention to the weather and how much panting he is doing. Long walks require a water break halfway through. Don't be afraid to head home and play ball in the house if the temps are 100 degrees plus, his heath is the most important thing! I teach all my dogs commands such as WAIT (when we need to stop for a moment) , LISTEN (for when I need their attention), SIDEWALK (for when I need them back on the sidewalk) and CROSS (for when crossing all intersections, they know to walk a straight line across). Teaching these commands strengthens our bond, and helps the Malamute to trust me, and understand my expectations. In addition to commands, I talk to the dog when walking, engaging him in listening to human speech, and shower him with praise for everything he does "right". Time spent with an Alaskan Malamute should be filled with positive reinforcement and reassurance, as they are pack dogs, and need to form a strong bond for their emotional health. It is also important when returning home to check the dogs paws for thorns trapped within their thick fur. Malamutes need daily grooming to stay clean and healthy! I love the challenge of working with an Alaskan Malamute. They are so insanely smart, and love to keep you guessing, but when you have earned their trust and respect, they will shower with love like no other breed can!
11 months, 2 weeks ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
sleep
Hikes
Winter walks
Furry beasts! Alaskan Malamute’s are big furry love bugs! I’ve met very friendly malamutes that have been great with walkers and are some of the most beautiful dogs I know. They enjoy a good adventure, particularly ones in the winter! Being so big and furry they do require a bit of grooming, particularly is you don’t want a fresh carpet of hair on your floor daily. Malamutes are playful and, from my experience, good around kids and other dogs. They are a commitment but one totally worth it! Be ready for long walks, big cuddles, wonderful naps, and tons of playtime. I believe they are rather trainable, especially when food is involved. I’ve loved every Alaskan Malamute I’ve met and have only had good experiences.
11 months, 2 weeks ago
11 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Walk
Eating Snacks
Explore the city
Bandit and I had a long stroll. He is a very strong dog despite his accelerated age and spent a good portion of the walk trying to convince me to speed things up. When I would talk to him he would look at me directly and was good about listening (if there wasn't something more interesting happening around us). Both in his lumbering gait (a result of elderly back hips) and in his stubbornness that his age was apparent, but he still had a bit of puppy in him. He'd occasionally try to pluck street snacks off the ground and would get excited at the sight of any small creature that happened to be around us (a cat, a squirrel, a rat). Despite his pulling, Bandit is a fantastic old guy.
11 months, 2 weeks ago
7 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
This dog is full of positive energy like no other. It is a friendly energy though. When I walk up to the house I immediately fell in love with him. He approached me as soon as I stepped in the driveway. He sniffed me and became excited. He probably knew it was time for a walk. He had the most adorable name too "Joey". It fit him well. He was so warm and lovable. He was huge of course but he did not seem threatening at all. I met him and just wanted to give him a big hug. He jumped up and licked me and threw his paws over . He was awesome! Gorgeous too! Joey had the most beautiful eyes I have ever seen. They were Arctic Blue. I was mesmerized. On our walk I felt so safe with him . He was protective even though we had just met. Joey was super alert at all times. Noticing dogs even across the street . We were on a busy street so his senses when on a hundred percent. I had a rock in my shoe and grunted . Joey immediately turned around to check on me. Once I said OK he continued on a walk. I fell in love in more. He barely knew me but still made sure I was fine before continuing. Ha had not known me for more than a few minutes and already he was considerate of me. What a loyal dog !He was playful and friendly to other dogs and people. When asked to stay or sit he would. He liked to lead but also listened. Since he was a puppy our walk was sporadic and fast. He loved to run. we were going up hill and it was such a work out for both of us. When other dogs passed us he acknowledge their presence but did not bark or approach them. He just kind of stood back alert. Like as if he was assessing the situation and ensuring there was not going to be a problem. On our way back home he did not want to head home and started nipping at the leash. I told him, per owners request, "JOEY NO " I said it in a stern voice and he did not try that again. Saying goodbye to Joey was upsetting because I did not know when I would see my new furry friend again. I was relieved he was going back to a loving home.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
5 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Running
Hikes
Dog Parks
Rollerjoring
Bikejoring
Agility training
socialization
The Alaskan Malamute I took care of had a lot of energy. For one, he was a puppy and two, that kind of breed have to exercise a lot if you don't want your house to be destroyed. I took him for really long walks, hikes and dog parks so he would burn all that energy. As a tip, I recommend trying to make the walks more interesting and challenging for this breed. Such as, having the dog pull you on roller skates or running with you while on a bike (bikejoring). My experience with this puppy was excellent, he had lots of love to give.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
2 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Walk
I walked two Alaskan Malamutes with a dual headed leash, and these dogs were very strong! They are well behaved dogs that are very smart and can be trained very well, making them very good sled dogs! The dogs knew sled commands and listened extremely well. However, again they are very strong dogs and especially when walking two at once, it is very important to have a tight grip on the leash at all times. They have plenty of energy and need to be walked at an efficient pace, the quicker the better. A tired Alaskan Malamute is a happy one! If walking then for a longer period of time, be sure to bring plenty of water along, especially in warmer climates.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
playing with other dogs
Running
Walking
I've walked two dogs of this breed and each time has been a joy! They're very friendly towards both humans and other dogs. They're very good leash walkers and didn't pull at all. They're happy go lucky and adorable but their cuteness comes at a price. Their coats need constant grooming due to the thickness and amount. They are heavy shedders and you'll be covered after simply petting them. They are a larger breed and can look like giant bears. But they are gentle giants and just want to be out and about! They're one of my favorite dogs i've walked! Very beautiful and calm dogs! Those looking to own one should do proper research to be sure they know what they're getting into! Definitely not for amateur dog owners.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
2 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Running
begging for food
barking at immobile objects
chasing things
howling
Walks
Hiking
snow
Incredibly fluffy, and adorable of course. But while they are cute they can certainly be a handful. I would say that they are stubborn when it comes to training, but it can be done. They do love exercise more than anything, and a tired dog is a dog that is willing to listen and behave. Overall a lovely breed.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Play
Walk
Alaskan Malamutes are an incredibly unique dog breed and as such, require special attention to their personality traits and quirks to make sure that they are a good fit for the owner. They are very beautiful dogs, so I feel they tend to attract people to them due to their gorgeous coat, curly tail, and bright eyes. However, I would highely encourage anyone who is considering this breed to at the very least look up videos of these dogs in action. Watch how they play, how they interact with people, and how high-energy they are. It can be tragic to have a Alaskan Malamute be stuck at home all day without enough exercise, only to come home to a destroyed house because they have too much energy!
11 months, 3 weeks ago
4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
doing tricks
marking territory
Walking
I love walking Alaskan Malamutes because they are just big lovers. They can be very intimidating at first, due to their sheer size and the deepness of their bark, but they are always well behaved for me. They have lots of energy and it is ideal that I cover a lot of ground when I walk Malamutes. They love to stop and smell trees, bushes, or grass. The Malamutes that I have walked are not distracted by other people walking, but will take notice if another dog is walking or barking at them through a fence. Cats can be a trigger, and I have to make sure they don’t dart after cats while we are walking. The fur on Malamutes is really thick, dense, and long; they should be brushed often to keep the fur under control. Malamutes are highly trainable and can be great walking partners if they are properly trained, but they can have a tendency to pull pretty badly if you let them.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
2 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Exploring
Walking
Runing
The Malamute was extremely energetic and was always affectionate. He was very playful. He was very investigative and somewhat aggressive on walks. He showed alot of stamina on walks. He was always slow to get tired. I enjoyed walking him because he was strong and very playful. He had an affinity for small mammals, namely squirrels. He was a good looking dog. His coat was black, grey and white. He had different colored eyes. One blue eye and one orange. He was unique. He was definitely from a good line. He was a strong dog. It should be known that they are strong runners and only strong trained runners should run with them. I enjoy walking him because I am in shape and enjoy the workout. If you are not a fairly strong person I would not recommend a Malamute as a pet. They need to be trained properly as they are large and energetic dogs. I would definitely consider a Malamute as a pet that I would like to have. The dog I handled is a great representative of the breed.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
6 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Very sweet pup. They have quite a bit of fur, and so in the summer you do have to make sure they don't get too hot. I would be prepared with water for this walk. They can also be stubborn, and are a larger breed.They tend to be very loyal towards their owner, but the one I walked was friendly towards other people.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
She seemed to really enjoy being out in the sun and frolicking about with other dogs in the park! She was an amazing listener with a keen eye for rodents and a keen ear for my voice. She knew her name very well which marked her intelligence and was also extremely food and treat motivated. We spent quite a bit of time playing and jogging all the way back to her house from the park. All in all, we traveled about 4 miles in an hour and it seemed like she could have gone further! A+
11 months, 3 weeks ago
8 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
I went on a rock climbing trip with someone who brought their Alaskan Malamute. This dog was beautiful and regal, but didn't care too much about any of the humans on the trip except for his owner. Did not want to be pet. He spent the weekend hiking around with the group off leash and listened well when his owner called him back. He was not outwardly aggressive towards other dogs we came across but really wanted nothing to do with them. If another dog would try to come up to him and play he would growl at it. A little high-strung... At one point I was climbing and the dog was nearby the bottom of the rock, I fell a short distance and when I landed on the ground the malamute actually ran over and tried to bite me. I suppose he was startled. Other than that one instance he was a good dog to have along on the trip and seemed to be always hunting for whatever wildlife he might find in the woods. Was fearless and would often attempt to go off on ledges that had us all scared until his owner would call him back and he came running.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Walk
Fetch
Such friendly giants. They are wonderful companions, and gorgeous to boot. They are very inquisitive, and sometimes don't know their own strength. Because they can be so big, and it's what they were bred for, they can tend to pull quite a bit unless they've been trained not to. All that I've encountered have been extremely gentle, easily trainable, and wonderful family dogs. They have big personalities and take their outdoor time very seriously! They love to walk, run, play with balls and sticks, hike and ride in the car. They also are very much “pack” animals- their family is their life, and they want to do everything with them. They can be prone to gaining weight as they’re big, energetic dogs, so they need lots of exercise!
11 months, 3 weeks ago
5 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
My experience with Alaskan Malamute's are that they are quite independent. I think their behavior could very well be mistaken as not friendly when in reality, they are just not the most affectionate breed. Very strong and sure personality, always seeming to be on a mission of sort. While they may not love cuddling or giving kisses, they will definitely make a great partner in adventuring.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
6 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Run
Running
Walk
Walking
Explore the city
I had an excellent experience with the malamute I walked. She barked loudly at first but not in a way that seemed angry or scared, just talking. Once I let her out she was good and immediately nice with me. I got her on a leash and she was also an easy walker. She was tempted to run, I saw her do a little leap a couple times, but she was still on her best behavior knowing I wasn't going to run. She ignored smaller dogs but once a bigger dog (Bernese Mountain) came around, she sniffed, and then definitely wanted to actually play with him. I had to drag her away but she was good about that too. Very relaxed, sweet, and affectionate, gentle giant type.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
5 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Malamutes are gentle giants. Their size can be daunting at first and if they’re not trained well they may pull you all around town, but they’re usually very good dogs. Always excited for their walk! Always excited to see what’s around the corner. These dogs would walk and walk as far as you’d let them.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Alaskan Malamutes are still in use as sled dogs for personal travel, hauling freight, or helping move light objects; some, however, are used for the recreational pursuit of sledding, also known as mushing, as well as for skijoring, bikejoring, carting, and canicross. However, most Malamutes today are kept as family pets or as show or performance dogs in weight pulling, dog agility, or packing. Malamutes are generally slower in long-distance dog sled racing against smaller and faster breeds, so their working usefulness is limited to freighting or traveling over long distances at a far slower rate than that required for racing. They can also help move heavy objects over shorter distances. An adult male Alaskan Malamute can pull around 500–1,500 kilograms (1,100–3,300 lb) of weight, depending on build and training.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
3 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Laying in the sun
Tug-of-war
Learn a new trick
Kaiden was a puppy. He had a very relaxed nature. He shed a lot. He liked playing tug-of-war. For being a small puppy, he already knew "sit", "down" and "paw". I rated him a 4/5 for Health, only because he was a little overweight (compared to his sibling, Al). He greeted other people. Very friendly pup that was still learning to walk on his leash. He enjoyed laying in the grass!
11 months, 3 weeks ago
1 Year
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Exploring
Sniffing
trotting
Jogging
The malamute I walked was very sweet and very eager to please. They were also very playful, had a strong puppy energy even though they would no longer be considered a puppy. Very kind and curious, and a bit stubborn. Probably due to their high intelligence.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
5 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
They can be very stubborn but they are the sweetest dogs ever, they are pretty much just big teddy bears and they learn very easily. My dog was potty trained right away and he’s very good with treats. I usually go and hide his treat and tell him to stay while i go do this and then when I’m ready I tell him to go find it and he sniffs it out right away. He also gives giant hugs, they are the cutest things in the world. I’m about 5’2” and when he stands up to give me a hug he’s probably about the same size as me. They are so lovable and this is my second malamute so they are really good dogs I would get another one in a heartbeat.
11 months, 3 weeks ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd