Beagi

United States
Beagle
Pembroke or Cardigan Welsh Corgi
The Beagi is a small, friendly designer dog, developed from the Beagle and either the Pembroke or the Cardigan Welsh Corgi. This combination of breed results in a sturdy, low-to-the-ground dog with a cheerful and devoted nature. They are intelligent and people-centric so training should be a breeze but the stubborn disposition of the Beagle can make the training experience a bit more challenging. If properly socialized, these handsome little dogs get along with just about everyone; they tend to be patient with children and sociable with adults and other dogs, although they may have a tendency to chase other small animals such as cats or rabbits.
Purpose
Scent hound, companion
Date of Origin
1990s
Ancestry
Beagle, Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Beagi Breed History

This hybrid was initially developed as recently as the 1990’s and is a cross between the Beagle, a tracking dog, and either the Pembroke or the Cardigan Welsh Corgi, a small herding dog. The Beagle is a rabbit tracking dog that has been a popular animal both as a hunting companion and a family dog for several centuries, and has been referenced to in writings from the 15th century forward, often by name. There have been a few changes in the Beagle breed since they first came on the scene. Breed standards for the Beagle were first set in the late 1800s, around the same time that The Beagle Club of England and the National Beagle Club in the United States were being formed and the Beagle was being recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1885 in the Hound category. The Corgi is also an ancient breed of dog, so ancient that their complete history may never be known. Many experts believe them to be related to the Swedish Vallhund and Flemish spitz-type dogs brought to Wales in the 11th century who were then developed and employed as sheep and cattle herders. The Corgi excels at this job as they are low enough to the ground to nip at the heels of livestock but agile enough to move out of the way before being kicked. The Cardigan and the Pembroke Welsh Corgi were frequently interbred until separate clubs were developed in the 1920’s when breed fanciers began differentiating the two. The Pembroke is slightly less heavily boned than the Cardigan and has feet that point directly forward rather than pointing slightly outward. The Pembroke Corgi is typically considered to be the more extroverted and affectionate of the two Corgis. The Beagi is still a new breed, and there can be a great deal of variation between different Beagi’s, often within the same litter.

Beagi Breed Appearance

There can be a great deal of variation between dogs within this particular hybrid combination as the puppies may get various traits from either parent. These dogs are small, usually 14’ tall or under at the shoulder and rarely over twenty pounds unless they are obese. The coat of the Beagi is double layered, with a soft, dense undercoat with a short protective layer of coarser fur overlaying it. This coat comes in many colors and white and black markings are common. They are usually longer than they are tall, although less so than their Corgi parent breed, and they have a broad skull that may be either flat or slightly domed in the back. The Beagi may either have the sturdy, square muzzle of the Beagle or the more fox-like tapering muzzle of the Corgi and although the ears of the Beagi are generally large in size, the Corgi tends to have an upright, triangular ear, and the Beagle has a long hanging ear that is rounded at the end, so many variations of those traits are possible with this mixed breed. Like both the Beagle and the Corgi, Beagi’s are typically sturdy animals, although the long back inherited from the Corgi heritage may predispose the dog to back injuries or spinal disorders. Their legs tend to be short and straight, and if the Corgi parentage was of the Pembroke Welsh Corgi variety, these pups may be born without a tail, or with just a nub for a tail.

Beagi Breed Maintenance

Maintenance for this combination of breeds is a relatively simple affair. Beagis are typically clean animals, although they may develop a little doggy odor over time, so they only really require bathing every two or three months or if they manage to get dirty or muddy. Although brushing the Beagi is not a daily chore, it is required at least two or three times a week to eliminate dead hair and keep the coat soft and healthy. Beagis, particularly Beagis with floppy ears, may be more likely to develop ear infections than some breeds, so it is doubly important to check and clean their ears on a regular basis.

Beagi Activity Requirements

The Beagi is a very sociable animal that loves to be the center of attention and can develop separation anxiety if ignored. If properly socialized they tend to be patient and merry little dogs who get along with most everyone, including adults, children, and other dogs. They can inherit a strong herding instinct from the Corgi along with a strong urge to chase from their Beagle heritage, which means that they may not be as appropriate for homes with other small animals such as cats or rodents. Although Beagis are very intelligent, they can be stubborn and rather difficult to train on occasion. Both of the parent breeds can be somewhat vocal, and this trait is enhanced when the animal is left alone for too long. If this hybrid is adequately socialized and exercised, their barking is typically minimized, and they can thrive in an apartment as easily as a larger home.

Beagi Owner Experiences

Brandy
18 Years
2 People
Condo
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Car rides
Eating Snacks
Fetch
chasing
Tug-of-war
Walking
My Beagi has actually past away this year, but I had no idea she was considered a "designer breed". I adopted her as a 3 month old pup from the Human Society in 2001! She was a great dog. Her beagle traits were her stubbornness and love for sniffing the grass and stout legs. Her pembroke Welsh Corgi traits were her long body, color and fur that did shed. She was smart and very social. She never had any health problems until her passing. She had severe arthritis in her back and legs upon her passing. I didn't let her suffer and she passed away peacefully. I highly recommend this breed, and would love to get another, but I don't know if I'll every be as lucky to get the right combination of beagle and corgi that I had in my sweet pooch.
7 months, 2 weeks ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd