Borador

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40-60 lbs
19-22"
Unknown
Border Collie Lab, Border Lab

The Borador is a highly intelligent and active hybrid dog, a combination of the Border Collie, an adept herding dog, and the Labrador Retriever, a proficient gun dog and retriever of fowl. This medium to large canine tends to get along well with children, strangers, and even other animals, and they are extremely eager to please their owner. This makes them a very easy dog to train, and they thrive on that training. This combination of breeds may become destructive and has a tendency to chew when they are bored, so keeping them busy is generally recommended. Due to their size and their high exercise requirements, the Borador will be happier in a home with a yard.

Purpose
Companion, Herding
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Border Collie, Labrador Retriever

Borador Health

Average Size
Height: 20-23 inches Weight: 45-65 lbs
Height: 19-22 inches Weight: 40-60 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy
  • Cataracts
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Lens Luxation
  • Osteochondritis Dissecans
Minor Concerns
  • Deafness
  • Pannus
  • Skin Problems
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Hip
  • Blood
  • Hearing
  • Skeletal
  • X-Rays
  • Physical Examination

Borador Breed History

The Borador is a crossbreed of two very popular dog breeds, the Border Collie and the Labrador Retriever, and is recognized by most of the hybrid and designer dog registries and clubs. As popular as it is, the Borador is still a newly recognized crossbreed most likely within the last ten to twenty years. The Border Collie is an extremely intelligent canine, considered by many experts to be the most intelligent overall breed of dog. This breed is an extremely old breed, believed to be a combination between small, spitz-like herding dogs that travelled with Viking raiders during the third century and somewhat larger Roman herding dogs that had relocated during the Roman invasion of Britain during the first century. They were bred for performance rather than for looks and although they are an attractive dog, they are first and foremost a working dog. The Labrador Retriever also has a long history, some of which we can only guess at; although most experts are in agreement that the St. John’s dog, a water dog that became extinct in the 1980’s, founded the Labrador Retriever breed, they are divided on whether the Newfoundland dog gave rise to the St. John’s dog or was bred from the St. John’s dog. The St. John’s dog with its short, oily coat, was as at home swimming in the water as running on land and worked alongside the fishermen on the coasts of Newfoundland. They, like the Labrador, were retrievers, although they specialized in retrieving nets, ropes, and even fish, rather than the waterfowl that the Labrador was bred for. It was in the 1800’s that James Harris and Walter Scott, both of whom had been breeding the St. John’s dog to be gun dogs, met while out shooting. Mr. Harris made a gift of two of his male retrievers to Mr. Scott, who then bred them to his own dogs. The resulting canines were the ancestors of today’s modern Labradors. The combination of the two results in a highly intelligent and energetic animal with an agreeable temperament and an intense work drive. 

Borador Breed Appearance

The Borador hybrid will generally be a medium sized dog with a fairly flat skull, although those that take after the Labrador may have a squarer muzzle while those that favor the Border Collie will have a muzzle that is thinner and more tapered at the front. The body of the Borador may be slightly longer than it is tall, and it should sport a deep, well formed chest. Both of the parent breeds are athletically built with strong, straight legs and long tails, so the hybrid will also be an athletic animal with a strong, straight legs and a long tail that hangs down when relaxed or follows the topline when alert or excited. Neither of the parents, nor the Borador itself, should have a tail that curls over the back of the dog, although either the tail may or may not be feathered. They will have a double layer coat with a short dense undercoat with a layer of straight, shiny guard hairs protecting it. The outer coat can be either short like the Labrador coat, or medium length like the Border Collie coat and on occasion, it may have a slight wave to it. Boradors are most often black & white, although they can come in golden or chocolate colors as well.

Borador Breed Maintenance

The Borador is a fairly easy hybrid to groom. Bathing is not a frequent requirement for this dog as they tend to have a low amount of doggy odor, but some Labradors and their offspring have a penchant for playing in the mud and rolling in things that are smelly, which necessitates more frequent bathing. The Border Collie is a moderate shedder but the Labrador Retriever sheds a remarkable amount of hair for such as short furred canine, particularly during the change of the seasons. This crossbreed will generally require a thorough brushing several times a week to eliminate hair and redistribute the animal’s natural oils, and daily brushing during the change of the seasons. Fortunately, for those with mild dander allergies, this dog’s coat is fairly dander free, so may not trigger the typical histamine response. 

Borador Temperament

The Borador has a balanced and caring nature, with a keen desire to please. They are an extremely intelligent and trainable dog, with a very cooperative attitude. They are also as active as they are intelligent and these canines will be much more balanced and confident if given a job or regular activity of some sort, and they tend to excel at most jobs that they are given. They are generally quite sociable and tend to be friendly to family members and strangers alike, although they will bark to alert their family to unexpected noises, making them an acceptable choice as a guard dog. The Borador is also affectionate towards children and other animals although they can be a bit boisterous when they are still young and they may inherit a tendency to herd small animals or children by nipping at their heels. They can also serve quite admirably as a service animal for the blind or otherwise disabled, or as an agility or frisbee competitor. 

Borador Activity Requirements

Both the Border Collie and the Labrador Retriever are very athletic and energetic animals, and they require a great deal of exercise. Although the mix is not quite as hyperactive as the purebred Border Collie, they are still generally happiest and healthiest when they get at least two hours of vigorous activity and mental stimulation per day. Along with brisk walks or jogs, this dog may also be able to expend their considerable energy with alternative activities, such as swimming, competitive frisbee, agility training, and herding. Although these dogs may be able to adapt to an apartment setting if they are given enough activity, they are generally better suited to larger homes with room to run. 

Borador Owner Experiences