Clumber Spaniel

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55-70 lbs
17-19"
England

The Clumber Spaniel dates back to the 1700s and is one of the oldest and stockiest of the Spaniel breeds. Some believe it is descended from the Alpine Spaniel, the Basset Hound, and the Saint Bernard. The dog is typically of medium height; however, they are still rather large dogs. They are sweet and gentle; often they are described as clownish. They do slobber and shed, but they are also easy to train and highly intelligent. His nickname is the retired gentleman’s Spaniel and he is also a great hunter. They are easy to housetrain, but should not be left alone in the home as they get bored easily and may chew on your valuables while you’re away. They are low to the ground with massive heads and short legs.

Purpose
bird flushing, retrieving
Date of Origin
1700s
Ancestry
spaniel, basset hound, saint bernard

Clumber Spaniel Health

Average Size
Height: 19-20 inches Weight: 70-85 lbs
Height: 17-19 inches Weight: 55-70 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Entropion
  • Hip Dysplasia
Minor Concerns
  • Ectropion
Occasional Tests
  • Eye
  • Hip
  • X-Rays
  • Eye Examination

Clumber Spaniel Breed History

One story attached to the Clumber Spaniel is that during the French Revolution, the French Duc de Noailles shipped all his Spaniels to the Duke of Newcastle in England in order to save his prized dogs. While there is little evidence to support this story, there is a 1788 painting of the Duke of Newcastle with several lemon and white dogs that closely resemble today’s Clumber Spaniel. The Spaniel took its name from the Duke of Newcastle’s estate, Clumber Park, in Nottingham, England. It was known as the Clumber Park Spaniel at that time. Prince Edward of Wales was quite a fan of the dog, and he kept them at his Sandringham House estate. Prince Albert, King Edward VII, and his son, King George V all favored the dog as well. The Clumber Spaniel first appeared in North America in 1844 when a British officer, Lieutenant Venables brought the Spaniel to his station in Nova Scotia, Canada. In 1878 the American Kennel Club first registered a dog of that breed. It was one of the first nine breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club. The clumber is a rare dog. It is number 122 of 155 breeds registered with the AKC and is.recognized as a sporting dog.

Clumber Spaniel Breed Appearance

The Clumber Spaniel is a large dog with a muscular build and large feet. It is generally white with lemon or orange markings. This agile breed has a double coat; its undercoat is dense and the outer coat is weather resistant. The coat is straight and flat with some feathering at the chest, legs, tail, and ears. The ears are naturally floppy, and the eyes are usually droopy.  With a frill on the neck, markings are usually found on the ears and face. Their feathered coat is usually soft to the touch, dense and straight. Lemon is the preferred marking on the predominantly white coat, but orange markings are also acceptable. The body size and shape make the Clumber Spaniel perfect for maneuvering through grass and bush to flush out pheasants and partridges. 


Eye Color Possibilities
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
Pied
White
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Clumber Spaniel Breed Maintenance

The Clumber Spaniel requires regular grooming in order to keep its coat in good shape. Brushing should be done two or three times per week; you may also have to trim the coat occasionally. The ears and eyes need regular cleaning as well and special attention should be paid to those two areas. Clumber Spaniels are heavy shedders unfortunately, and they also drool a good bit as well. Clumbers can do well in an apartment, but they do need at least twenty minutes of exercise daily. They do enjoy a good swim. They are relatively easy to housebreak, but it is recommended that they are also crate trained for when you have to be away from home. Clumber Spaniels do have a tendency to be mischievous and get into things which they shouldn’t even as they grow out of the puppy stage. However, as they age, they become more inactive.

Brushes for Clumber Spaniel
Pin Brush
Comb
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Daily Weekly Monthly

Clumber Spaniel Temperament

The Clumber Spaniel is known to be docile, sweet, smart, and pleasant all around. They are easygoing and very affectionate. As they get older, they are less active. They do well with children and other animals, especially if they are raised together. They must be socialized from a young age.  They are not overly dominant, but if they sense that their owner is passive, they may try to get the upper hand. Friendly and easy going, they are playful and trustworthy; they do not bark often. They need a calm, firm owner who gives consistent discipline. They are easy to train as they have good memories, and they wish to please their masters. They do enjoy chewing, so having chew toys is a must. They enjoy hunting pheasant and partridges and are good water dogs.

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
8 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
60 minutes

Clumber Spaniel Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
2.8 cups
Daily Cost
$1.5 - $1.9
Monthly Cost
$39 - $52

Clumber Spaniel Height & Weight

6 Months
Height: 15 inches Weight: 34 lbs
Height: 14 inches Weight: 29 lbs
12 Months
Height: 18 inches Weight: 52 lbs
Height: 16 inches Weight: 47 lbs
18 Months
Height: 19 inches Weight: 77 lbs
Height: 18 inches Weight: 62 lbs

Top Clumber Spaniel Breeders

Check out who made our list for the most reputable Clumber Spaniel breeders of 2017.
Chiffon Clumber Spaniels
Dexter, Iowa
Shogun Clumber Spaniel
Dousman, Wisconsin
Avalea Clumber Spaniel
Atlanta, Georgia
King Clumber Spaniels
Davie, Florida
Nexus Clumber Spaniels
Schoolcraft, Michigan
Pinecliff Clumbers
Morganton, Georgia
Whidbey Kennel
Monroe, Washington
TYCA'S Clumber Spaniels
Powell, Wyoming
SunMagic Clumber Spaniels
Hillsborough, North Carolina

Clumber Spaniel Owner Experiences