Victorian Bulldog

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55-65 lbs
16-18"
London, England

The English Bulldog has changed considerably since it was developed in the 1800s. Photographs from the era show a muscular dog much like the modern English Bulldog, but with a longer muzzle, longer legs, and generally a less curled tail. Breeder Ken Mollett in London began breeding modern English Bulldogs with Bull Terriers, Bull Mastiffs, and Staffordshire Bull Terriers in an attempt to recreate the Bulldog as it appeared in Victorian times and to reduce genetic defects. These canines are muscular and athletic but they don’t require as much physical activity as most athletic breeds and are generally gentle and tolerant with people and other pets.

Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
1980s
Ancestry
English Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Bull Mastiff, Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Victorian Bulldog Health

Average Size
Male Victorian Bulldog size stats
Height: 17-19 inches Weight: 70-75 lbs
Female Victorian Bulldog size stats
Height: 16-18 inches Weight: 55-65 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Skin Allergies
Minor Concerns
  • Canine Hip Dysplasia (Chd)
  • Obesity
Occasional Diagnoses
  • None Known
Occasional Tests
  • Skin Scrapings and Biopsies
  • X-rays or other radiographic imaging
  • Allergy Testing

Victorian Bulldog Breed History

When the English Bulldog was first developed, there was still a great deal of subjectiveness when it came to classifying dogs like these and breed names could be rather imprecise. A large dog could go by the title of Mastiff strictly on the basis of size, but could also be referred to as a Bandog, a term that at the time could be in regards to any of the type of dogs that were kept chained, and the Bulldog was any dog used in the practice of baiting bulls. By the 1800’s, a clear description of the English Bulldog as a separate breed was available in the Cynographia Britannica, by Sydenham Edwards, portraying their round heads, their wide chest, and their natural underbite. The preferences and practices of English Bulldog breeders eventually led to a dog that looked quite a bit different than that of the original English Bulldog, with shorter, somewhat bowed legs, a shorter muzzle and tail, and an even more pronounced underbite which led to the prevalence of several serious disorders within the breed. Starting in the 1940s several breeders decided to try and recreate the breed as it had once been in the hopes of restoring their original vigor and healthy constitutions while retaining the pleasant, easy-going natures that the breed had been infused with, including the American Bulldog developed in large part by John D Johnson and Alan Scot, the Olde English Bulldogge developed by Dr. Fechimer, both of which are recognized by the United Kennel Club, and the Dorset Olde Tyme Bulldog developed by Steve Barnett, and the Olde Victorian Bulldogge by Carlos Woods neither of which have been recognized by any major kennel clubs. In developing the Victorian Bulldog, developer Ken Mollett from London utilized not only English Bulldogs, but also Bull Terriers, Bull Mastiffs, and Staffordshire Bull Terriers. The emerging breed of the Victorian Bulldog is gaining in popularity and leading unscrupulous or ill-informed breeders to breed different bully type dogs together and sell their offspring as Victorian Bulldogs. 

Victorian Bulldog Breed Appearance

The standard that Mr. Mollett set forth to describe the Victorian Bulldog characterizes them as a medium-sized dog, around a foot and a half at the shoulder and weighing between 55 and 75 pounds. Like the English Bulldog, they are thick boned, muscular, and they possess large heads and large muscular necks, but these qualities should not be so exaggerated that they impede the health or motion of the dog. Their broad, turned up muzzle should be short, but not so short as to impede breathing, and their undershot jaw has a square bite. They have dark, low-set eyes that face forward and medium-to-short rose or button-shaped ears which should never be cropped. The tail can be straight or it can turn down or have a corkscrew shape but it will not be carried over the back, and their short, soft coat can come in any color of brindle, or in white, or in red, fawn, pied, or fallow with white markings. 

Eye Color Possibilities
brown Victorian Bulldog eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Victorian Bulldog nose
Black
isabella Victorian Bulldog nose
Isabella
Coat Color Possibilities
pied Victorian Bulldog coat
Pied
white Victorian Bulldog coat
White
red Victorian Bulldog coat
Red
fawn Victorian Bulldog coat
Fawn
brindle Victorian Bulldog coat
Brindle
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Victorian Bulldog straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Victorian Bulldog Breed Maintenance

The Victorian Bulldog typically requires a few more baths than many other breeds and should be bathed around every month or two to avoid odor. Although they have fewer wrinkles than their English Bulldog ancestors it is still important to check the wrinkles they do have on a frequent basis to ensure that they have not trapped any dirt or moisture as this can encourage skin issues to develop. Their short coats so shed a bit so they should be brushed on a weekly basis to keep their fur clean and glossy. Special attention should be paid to the dental hygiene of dogs with undershot jaws such as the Victorian Bulldog.  

Brushes for Victorian Bulldog
Slicker Brush
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Victorian Bulldog requires monthly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Victorian Bulldog Temperament

While the English Bulldog was originally bred to be an aggressive animal, capable of controlling bulls many times their size, breeding preferences shifted after the sport of bull baiting was made illegal, and breeders focused on creating a dog with a gentler and more tractable personality. This gentler personality was inherited by the Victorian Bulldog and they generally get along well both with people and with most other types of animal, although they can sometimes get rather churlish when dealing with other canines. While all interactions between canines and small children should be closely supervised, the Victorian Bulldog is typically very tolerant of their behavior. Their placid but stubborn personality can make training a challenge, but they can be taught using a positive attitude and lots of praise and treats. While these dogs may sometimes take a while to get the idea, once they learn something, they tend to remember it. 

Victorian Bulldog Activity Requirements

While most Victorian Bulldogs are more than happy to lounge around all day, these muscular dogs do need daily exercise to maintain their physiques and to prevent obesity. While English Bulldogs may have some difficulty with long or arduous walks due to breathing problems and shortened legs, the Victorian Bulldog typically has more stamina due to their lengthened muzzles and legs. They are slightly more susceptible to both heat and cold than many other breeds. These dogs may seem a little large for the average apartment-type setting, but their lackadaisical attitude indoors tends to make them pleasant roommates even in small spaces.  

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
7 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
45 minutes

Victorian Bulldog Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
2.5 cups
Daily Cost
$1.2 - $1.4
Monthly Cost
$34 - $45

Victorian Bulldog Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Victorian Bulldog size stats at six months
Height: 15 inches Weight: 51 lbs
Female Victorian Bulldog size stats at six months
Height: 14 inches Weight: 42 lbs
12 Months
Male Victorian Bulldog size stats at 12 months
Height: 17 inches Weight: 65 lbs
Female Victorian Bulldog size stats at 12 months
Height: 16 inches Weight: 54 lbs
18 Months
Male Victorian Bulldog size stats at 18 months
Height: 18 inches Weight: 72 lbs
Female Victorian Bulldog size stats at 18 months
Height: 17 inches Weight: 60 lbs

Victorian Bulldog Owner Experiences

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