Alano Espanol

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55-77 lbs
22-24"
Spain
Spanish Bulldog, Alano, Spanish Alano

The Alano Espanol is a large breed dog that originated in Spain. They were bred to be a hunter, guard dog and herding dog. This is not a breed for the faint of heart, they are large and stubborn. This can make for an interesting combination if you are unfamiliar with how to properly train a large dog. They do need a definite leader in the home; once trained the Alano Espanol can be very affectionate and loyal. Do expect to spend a good amount of time with them each day; they are a high energy dog requiring a lot of exercise. 

Purpose
Hunting, Guard Dog, Herding Dog
Date of Origin
Ancient Times
Ancestry
Molosser-type

Alano Espanol Health

Average Size
Male Alano Espanol size stats
Height: 23-25 inches Weight: 66-88 lbs
Female Alano Espanol size stats
Height: 22-24 inches Weight: 55-77 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Usually A Very Healthy Breed
Minor Concerns
  • Hip And Elbow Dysplasia
Occasional Diagnoses
  • None Known
Occasional Tests
  • Yearly Physical Examination
  • OFA on hips and elbows

Alano Espanol Breed History

The Alano Espanol is an ancient breed with an uncertain history. Since their history has not been well documented through the years there are several theories concerning their origin. One such theory is these dogs were brought when the Alans invaded the Iberian Peninsula in 406 A.D. Dogs closely resembling the Alano Espanol were found in several different places throughout Europe that were invaded by the Alans. The largest population was of course found in Spain. Because this is an ancient breed, they did not originate from any breed that is known. Many researchers have concluded they originated from ancient molosser-type breeds and may even share similar ancestors to the Dogue de Bordeaux, Mastiff or Great Dane. The Alano Espanol was used for centuries to herd cattle that ran wild throughout many regions of Spain. This breed had five main purposes. Aside from herding wild cattle they were used in bullfights and dog fights, as big game hunters and guard dogs, and were even used in times of war. Because the Alano Espanol was used for hunting wild boar, dog fighters saw their potential to be successful in the fighting pits. They were also used extensively in bullfights until bullfighting was banned in 1883. Carlos Contera, along with several of his colleagues, searched throughout Spain for any remaining Alano Espanol purebreds, fearing they were extinct. Contera was able to locate a handful in southwest Spain in an area called Extremadura and in the central plateau of Castille. The team also found a rather large number of Alano Espanol in northern Spain in the Encartaciones Valley. The DNA of these dogs was sent to the University of Cordoba’s School of Veterinary Medicine to verify the authenticity of the breed. In the early 1980s a group of researchers began tracing the demographic layout of the Alano Espanol. Today, the Alano Espanol is still used as a guard dog and on occasion works cattle. They can also be found in illegal dog fighting rings because of their powerful jaws. 

Alano Espanol Breed Appearance

The Alano Espanol is a large, sturdy dog with a somewhat primitive appearance. It is believed their appearance has not changed much for several centuries. They have a well proportioned body, arched ribcage and long, muscular legs. Their chest is deep and well muscled. Their feet are large with tight fitting toes. The tail is long with a thick base and is carried low; however it should not rest against the dog’s back end. The Alano Espanol is brachycephalic, meaning they have shorter, flatter faces with a square shape. They do have powerful jaws that are able to lock closed when biting. Their eyes are slightly rounded and dark in color giving them a serious expression. They have a large, broad nose with open nostrils and always black. Usually their ears are cropped with a slightly rounded tip, when uncropped, their ears are medium sized and carried folded forward. Their coat is short, harsh and straight with a softer undercoat. Acceptable coat colors include wolf gray, fawn, red and yellow. There can be brindling, a black mask or black and tan markings. 

Eye Color Possibilities
brown Alano Espanol eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Alano Espanol nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
brindle Alano Espanol coat
Brindle
black Alano Espanol coat
Black
fawn Alano Espanol coat
Fawn
red Alano Espanol coat
Red
gray Alano Espanol coat
Gray
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Alano Espanol straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Alano Espanol Breed Maintenance

The Alano Espanol does not require a lot of grooming; usually brushing once a month is good enough unless they are shedding. They do shed seasonally. If they live in the home it would be better to brush them at least once a week to keep their coat free of dirt and loose hairs. Frequent brushing also helps keep any odors from becoming potent. When brushing, use a soft slicker brush or natural bristle brushes. They should not need to be bathed often to prevent dry skin from occurring. Bathe only two to three times a year and only use a mild shampoo. There are only two known molosser-type breeds that do not snore, slobber or drool: the Alano Espanol and the Cane Corso. Trim their nails every few weeks as needed using either toenail clippers or a nail grinder. Set up a dental routine including weekly teeth brushing to keep their teeth and gums healthy.

Brushes for Alano Espanol
Slicker Brush
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Alano Espanol requires monthly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Alano Espanol Temperament

This breed takes their job very seriously and is not recommended for the non-dominant owner. The Alano Espanol is a dominant dog but will submit to their master when properly trained. They have the potential to be affectionate and docile when they are handled from birth, socialized early and trained properly. They are not big barkers but will become destructive if not given enough attention. This breed does not give a warning before attacking and should be watched closely around people they do not know. When working, the Alano Espanol will follow orders given, ignoring any pain or fear that they feel; they will even fight to the death. This type of loyalty to their job is what made them ideal for bullfighting and wild boar hunting. However, if they choose to attack and cannot be called off by their owner, they can kill other dogs or even humans. Training is essential. Unlike most large breed dogs, the Alano Espanol does not easily housebreak. 

Alano Espanol Activity Requirements

This breed must be given ample exercise and human interaction daily to keep them from becoming overly destructive. A large yard with a tall, sturdy fence is ideal for them. Their temperament is such that they need to have a job to do in order for them to be happy. Expect to take them on at least three daily walks to allow them time to practice their obedience training and work on the bond between owner and dog. When walking, avoid meeting strangers until you are certain your Alano Espanol is fully trained. While not generally dog aggressive, you will want to watch them closely if you take them to a dog park.

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
14 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
60 minutes

Alano Espanol Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
2.8 cups
Daily Cost
$1.5 - $1.9
Monthly Cost
$39 - $52

Alano Espanol Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Alano Espanol size stats at six months
Height: 19 inches Weight: 35 lbs
Female Alano Espanol size stats at six months
Height: 18 inches Weight: 30 lbs
12 Months
Male Alano Espanol size stats at 12 months
Height: 21 inches Weight: 52 lbs
Female Alano Espanol size stats at 12 months
Height: 20 inches Weight: 47 lbs
18 Months
Male Alano Espanol size stats at 18 months
Height: 24 inches Weight: 77 lbs
Female Alano Espanol size stats at 18 months
Height: 23 inches Weight: 66 lbs

Alano Espanol Owner Experiences

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