Lhasa-Coton

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9-14 lbs
8-12"
United States
Coton de Tulear
Lhasa Apso
Lhasa de Tulear

The Lhasa Coton is a cute mix of the Coton de Tulear and Lhasa Apso. They are both toy breeds so this hybrid will not get much bigger than 10 pounds and 11 inches tall on average. They have a long, thick coat that is straight and comes in any color or color combination. The Lhasa Coton is an energetic and courageous dog that loves people and other pets. However, they should be supervised with small children because they will snap if teased too much. This breed may take a bit of patience to train so you have to be prepared to spend extra time doing so. 

Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
2000s
Ancestry
Coton de Tulear and Lhasa Apso

Lhasa-Coton Health

Average Size
Height: 9-13 inches Weight: 10-15 lbs
Height: 8-12 inches Weight: 9-14 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Canine Hip Dysplasia (Chd)
  • Brachycephalic Syndrome
  • Exposure Keratopathy Syndrome
Minor Concerns
  • Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Allergies
Occasional Tests
  • Eye Examination
  • Respiratory Tests
  • Skin Evaluation
  • Internal Imaging (x-ray, CT scan, MRI, etc.)

Lhasa-Coton Breed History

The Coton de Tulear came from Madagascar in the 1600s but their origin is still somewhat of a mystery. They are thought to be related to the Havanese, Maltese, and the Bichon Frise and are known for their long, white coats and sweet disposition. They like to be the center of attention but can be happy at home when you are gone if they have other pet friends to play with. It is assumed that the Coton de Tulear was brought on ships during long sea voyages and used as ratters and companions. According to legend, the dog ended up on Madagascar by being the only survivors of a shipwreck when they swam to the shores and lived on the streets of Tulear, which is where they got their name. They became popular in France after a Frenchman visiting Madagascar found one and brought it home. Soon after, the United States discovered the Coton de Tulear and they were registered with the American Kennel Club in 2014 where they are the 80th most popular dog breed. The Buddhist Monks have kept Lhasa Apsos as guardians in their monasteries and temples since ancient times. They are thought to be bred from Tibetan Terriers and some type of mountain wolf dogs. The breed was protected and only used by the Monks for their amazing sense of hearing, good judge of character, and ability to withstand the freezing temperatures of the mountains. Some were given as gifts to dignitaries and the Dalai Lama gave several of them to a New Jersey family, who made them popular in the United States. The American Kennel Club registered them in 1935 and they are the 71st most popular dog breed in America.

Lhasa-Coton Breed Appearance

These fluffy little dogs have big, round, brown eyes and a small black nose on a shortened muzzle. The short muzzle can cause brachycephalic syndrome in some dogs so you should get your dog checked by a veterinary care provider as soon as you can. Both parent breeds have long floppy and furry ears and a long, feathered tail that curves up over their back. Although the Lhasa Apso has longer hair than the Coton de Tulear, the Lhasa Coton usually has long, silky hair as well. Their short legs are strong and their body is compact and sturdy. 

Eye Color Possibilities
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
Black
Gray
Brown
Red
Cream
Fawn
White
Sable
Brindle
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Lhasa-Coton Breed Maintenance

The long, silky coat of the Lhasa Coton needs to be groomed often. In fact, it is best to brush your dog with a pin brush and metal comb at least four or five times a week, if not every day. Their fur can become matted and tangled if not brushed often. They do not need to be bathed often and their skin has a tendency to become dry if shampooed too much. You should also clean their ears with a moist cotton ball once a week and check for redness, ear mites, and irritation that may be caused by yeast or bacteria. In addition, your dog’s toenails need to be clipped when necessary and the teeth brushed at least three times per week.

Brushes for Lhasa-Coton
Pin Brush
Dematter
Comb
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Daily Weekly Monthly

Lhasa-Coton Temperament

The Lhasa Coton is not aggressive but can get aggravated with small children if they are allowed to tease them. They get along well with other pets but should be socialized well so they can get along with other animals such as the dogs at the dog park. When training, you should use positive reinforcement rather than physical discipline so your dog does not become aggressive. The Lhasa Coton is a smart dog but can be stubborn and lazy so you may have to teach them more than once if you want them to learn something. However, they are lovable and sweet for the most part and make excellent companions.

Lhasa-Coton Activity Requirements

Your Lhasa Coton does not need as much exercise as most dogs but you should make sure she gets at least 30 minutes of vigorous activity per day. Some of the activities your Lhasa Coton may enjoy are playing fetch, flyball, or frisbee, hiking, going for walks in the neighborhood, playing with other dogs at the dog park, and even swimming. She may also like agility competitions or obedience training activities. If your dog does not get enough exercise, she may become anxious and develop behavior problems. This breed also has a tendency to become overweight if they do not get enough activity. 

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
5 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
30 minutes

Lhasa-Coton Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$0.8 - $1
Monthly Cost
$20 - $30

Lhasa-Coton Height & Weight

6 Months
Height: 7 inches Weight: 8 lbs
Height: 6 inches Weight: 7 lbs
12 Months
Height: 9 inches Weight: 11 lbs
Height: 9 inches Weight: 10 lbs
18 Months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 12 lbs
Height: 10 inches Weight: 11 lbs

Lhasa-Coton Owner Experiences

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