Silky Jack

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8-11 lbs
8-11"
United States
Jack Russell Terrier
Silky Terrier
Silky Jack Russell
This little dog with the long silky hair is called the Silky Jack, which is a combination of the Jack Russell Terrier and the Silky Terrier. Because these two breeds are both toy breeds, the Silky Jack will typically not get over 12 inches tall and weighs about 15 pounds on average. Their silky, long, straight coat can be various colors such as cream, chocolate, black, gray, and many others. They are easy to train but as a terrier, they have a high level of energy and need frequent exercise to stay healthy. Also, they need to be brushed and bathed on a regular basis due to their long coat.
Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
2000s
Ancestry
Jack Russell Terrier and Silky Terrier

Silky Jack Health

Average Size
Male Silky Jack size stats
Height: 9-12 inches Weight: 12-15 lbs
Female Silky Jack size stats
Height: 8-11 inches Weight: 8-11 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Tracheal Collapse
  • Spongiform Leukodystrophy
  • Subaortic Stenosis
Minor Concerns
  • Urolithiasis
  • Legg-Calve Perthes Disease
  • Canine Cushing’s Disease
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Von Willebrand's Disease
  • Deafness
  • Degenerative Myopathy (DM)
  • Various Eye Conditions
Occasional Tests
  • Blood And Urine Analysis
  • Diagnostic Imaging
  • Cardiac Test
  • Eye and Ear Examination
  • DNA

Silky Jack Breed History

The Silky Jack does not have a well-known history yet since they are a new hybrid but you can look at the histories of the Jack Russell Terrier and Silky Terrier. The Jack Russell Terrier is an English breed that originated around the 1800s by a reverend named John Russell, who was a serious fox hunter. He bred these dogs to cultivate the perfect fox hunting and flushing breed. At the time, they were named the Parson Russell Terrier and they were bred from different types of Terriers. Eventually, the Parson Russell Terrier was changed to Jack Russell Terrier in some areas but was still considered the Parson Russell Terrier in others. In fact, there are two clubs in the United States for this same breed, one named the Jack Russell Terrier Club of America and the other is named the Parson Russell Terrier Association of the United States. The American Kennel Club actually listed the breed as the Jack Russell Terrier in 1997 but they changed the name to Parson Russell Terrier in 2003. They are the 109th most common breed in the United States. The Silky Terrier is an Australian dog that originated in the 1800s by breeding the Yorkshire Terrier and Australian Terrier to create a good companion pet. It was not actually recognized as a breed until 1906 in New South Wales and then in Victoria three years later. However, there were some variations in the breed standards between the two and there was not a universally accepted breed standard until 1926. Six years later, the Silky Terrier was named the Sydney Silky and the Kennel Control Council of Victoria made it illegal to cross breed any more Silky Terriers with Australian and Yorkshire Terriers. The breed was brought to America in 1955 when American soldiers returned from WWII and the Silky Terrier Club of America was founded. The AKC acknowledged the breed in 1959 where they are the 100th most well-liked breed. 

Silky Jack Breed Appearance

The Silky Jack has a coat that matches its name and can come in many color variations such as chocolate and cream; black, white, and brown; gray, blue, and black; sable and white; blue and silver; red, brindle, and white; pied; or any combination of these colors. They are very small, weighing less than 15 pounds and standing less than a foot high. Their body is sturdy but short, with tiny legs, small, almond shaped brown eyes, and a black nose on a small muzzle. Their furry ears may stand erect or hang down and their tail may be short or medium length and feathered.
Eye Color Possibilities
brown Silky Jack eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Silky Jack nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
brindle Silky Jack coat
Brindle
sable Silky Jack coat
Sable
pied Silky Jack coat
Pied
white Silky Jack coat
White
silver Silky Jack coat
Silver
blue Silky Jack coat
Blue
fawn Silky Jack coat
Fawn
cream Silky Jack coat
Cream
red Silky Jack coat
Red
brown Silky Jack coat
Brown
gray Silky Jack coat
Gray
black Silky Jack coat
Black
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Silky Jack straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Silky Jack Breed Maintenance

You should be prepared to brush your Silky Jack on a daily basis due to the length and silkiness of her coat. They have a tendency to get tangled or matted so you will need to use a pin brush and comb and possibly a dematter as well. The Silky Jack needs to be bathed with special conditioner to keep her coat from getting frizzy and tangled. Bathing her twice a month is recommended. You should also trim her nails with a nail clipper once a month or as needed and clean her teeth with a soft toothbrush once a week.
Brushes for Silky Jack
Pin Brush
Dematter
Comb
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Silky Jack requires daily brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Silky Jack Temperament

This affectionate breed can make a wonderful family pet if socialized and trained properly. They are alert and cheerful for the most part with a loyal heart and fun disposition but they can be wary of strangers. It is best if you introduce them to visitors because they have a tendency to bark or become defensive if they suspect danger. The Silky Jack is easy to train as long as you set the rules early and stand your ground. Be sure to practice positive reinforcement rather than physical punishment to prevent aggression. As long as they get enough exercise and attention, your Silky Jack should have no problems being home alone for a few hours a day while you work but if you are going to be gone longer, you should get someone to come and care for your pet.

Silky Jack Activity Requirements

The Silky Jack needs a lot of activity to stay healthy because they have tons of anxious energy to get rid of. If you have a fenced yard, it is good if you can let your dog run around for a few hours a day chasing rabbits and squirrels but you also need to spend some quality time with her. At least once or twice a day, you should take her for a walk and you can also take her to play with other dogs at a dog park, to the beach or lake to swim, or to the woods for a hike. 

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
8 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
60 minutes

Silky Jack Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
1 cups
Daily Cost
$0.80 - $1.00
Monthly Cost
$20.00 - $30.00

Silky Jack Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Silky Jack size stats at six months
Height: 9 inches Weight: 7 lbs
Female Silky Jack size stats at six months
Height: 8 inches Weight: 5 lbs
12 Months
Male Silky Jack size stats at 12 months
Height: 10 inches Weight: 10 lbs
Female Silky Jack size stats at 12 months
Height: 9 inches Weight: 7 lbs
18 Months
Male Silky Jack size stats at 18 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 13 lbs
Female Silky Jack size stats at 18 months
Height: 10 inches Weight: 9 lbs

Silky Jack Owner Experiences

Lily
10 Weeks
4 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Tug-of-war
Good she is very loving full of energy can sometimes be naughty but easy to love
5 months, 1 week ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd