Malinois Greyhound

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45-75 lbs
United States
Belgian Malinois
As a hybrid breed, the Malinois Greyhound is a 50/50 mix between the Belgian Malinois and the Greyhound. Such an interesting combination results in a large, lean dog that is extremely athletic and intelligent. While the features of the Mal and the Greyhound and somewhat similar, the differences that can be seen in the Malinois Greyhound are primarily the ears and body type. The Greyhound has a very trademark 'S' shaped body that has a large chest and tucked in waist with a narrow face; all of which enable him to be incredibly fast and streamlined. The Belgian Malinois on the other hand is more muscular and while also very agile and athletic, has bigger paws and a sturdier build. Combining these two breeds results in the Malinois Greyhound who is a large dog with a balance between being extremely active and laid back as well as intelligent and loving. Unlike the Malinois himself, the Malinois Greyhound makes an excellent house companion and tends to lean more towards the Greyhound side; meaning he is typically medium-energy and usually an excellent choice for families with small children or other pets.
Work and Companion Animal
Date of Origin
Belgian Malinois and the Greyhound

Malinois Greyhound Health

Average Size
Male Malinois Greyhound size stats
Height: 26-30 inches Weight: 65-80 lbs
Female Malinois Greyhound size stats
Height: 24-28 inches Weight: 45-75 lbs
Major Concerns
  • None Known
Minor Concerns
  • Deafness
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy
  • Retinal Dysplasia
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Pannus
  • Megaesophagus
  • Hemophilia
  • Cutaneous Asthenia
Occasional Diagnoses
  • None Known
Occasional Tests
  • Hip X-Rays
  • Dna For Pra
  • Eye Examinations
  • Blood Tests
  • Full Physical Examination
  • Hearing and Ear Tests

Malinois Greyhound Breed History

The Greyhound and the Belgian Malinois have been around long enough to possess a rich history that mentions the reasoning behind why the breed was created, as well as what the breed is used for today. Because the Malinois Greyhound is a newer breed, he does not have the same weight to his history as his parent do. So, in order to understand why this unique hybrid was created and what he may be used for today, we need to take a look at his paren't history. For instance, the Greyhound is a breed that is thought to be among the most ancient of dog breeds. For millennia,  breeds like the Greyhound have been around for centuries were even written about in Roman poetry and stories due to their fascinating and sleek body style. While no one is really sure why the breed was created initially, there is no doubt that their incredible speed and hound like nose were most likely developed in order to make a fast and intelligent hunting dog. Regardless of what the Greyhound was made for, there is no doubt that he is a stunning and impressive animal. Because the breed is so unique in terms of his 'S' shaped body style and incredible sprinting ability, the DNA of the Greyhound has been altered very little over the years and what we know today is most likely very similar to what the ancients knew and loved years ago. Greyhounds were brought to the New World around the 16th century by Spanish explorers and ever since the awe-inspiring breeds have been used for show and racing in both Europe and the United States. The Greyhound was recognized by the American Kennel Club in the year 1885 and has been a relatively well-known show and companion dog ever since. While the Greyhound was well-known for his speed, the Belgian Malinois was popular for his agility, high-intelligence, and herding skills. This breed was originally created in Belgium and takes his name from the town of Malines. Although the Mal was most likely popular long before the 1800s for herding and guarding farms, it wasn't until 1891 that the breed became extremely popular and divided into types with individual names. When sheep herding became slightly less popular in the modern world, the Malinois needed a new line of work. It was then that these athletic and fiercely loyal dogs became companions to police officers.  Due to their high intelligence and eager to please mentality, the Mal excelled in police work and were even used periodically during World War I. Despite the Malinois' many talents, the breed actually completely disappeared from America by 1939. It wasn't until 20 years later, after World War II, that more of the dogs were imported over and began working with the police once again. Today, the Malinois is still used as a police dog and can be an excellent companion for the right family.

Malinois Greyhound Breed Appearance

Thanks to the interesting body types of both the Greyhound and the Malinois, the Malinois Greyhound tends to have a very slim and agile body with a long and lean face. His eyes are big and round, with ears that are either tall or slightly folded; taking after whichever parent breed has the stronger genes. A narrow head and scissor bite make up the structure of the Malinois Greyhound's face and paired with his thin body, deep chest, and long tail, this breed is very streamlined and athletic. He can also be more muscular and filled out like the Malinois, but this can vary greatly even within the same litter. The fur of the Malinois Greyhound is short and tends to shed often, therefore requiring daily brushing to keep the shedding at a minimum. The Malinois Greyhound can come in a number of different colors and prefers warmer weather due to his shorter fur.
Eye Color Possibilities
hazel Malinois Greyhound eyes
brown Malinois Greyhound eyes
amber Malinois Greyhound eyes
Nose Color Possibilities
black Malinois Greyhound nose
brown Malinois Greyhound nose
Coat Color Possibilities
brindle Malinois Greyhound coat
silver Malinois Greyhound coat
fawn Malinois Greyhound coat
isabella Malinois Greyhound coat
cream Malinois Greyhound coat
brown Malinois Greyhound coat
gray Malinois Greyhound coat
black Malinois Greyhound coat
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Malinois Greyhound straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Malinois Greyhound Breed Maintenance

The Malinois Greyhound is a very low maintenance breed. Brushing only needs to occur a couple times a week in order to remove any dirt or loose fur that may be lying on the body. Both parent breeds are seasonal shedders, so you can expect that a lot of fur from the Malinois Greyhound will end up on the furniture and floor, but with a couple of grooming sessions with a slicker brush and comb, the shedding can be managed. Bathing only needs to occur for the Malinois Greyhound every few months unless he gets especially dirty as this breed does not have a bad odor. Besides brushing and bathing, be sure to clean your dog's ears often and trim his nails every few weeks in order to keep his paws healthy and snag free.
Brushes for Malinois Greyhound
Slicker Brush
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Malinois Greyhound requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Malinois Greyhound Temperament

The Malinois Greyhound is an excellent combination of companion and working dog thanks to the match up of his parents. Although the Greyhound is extremely fast, he is firstly a companion dog who is loving, playful, and quiet. This breed is perfectly happy to lay around the house and enjoy his owners company without making a big fuss and does wonderfully with small children and other pets. The only downside about the Greyhound half is that the breed can be rather independent so training can be difficult. Thankfully, the Malinois side is very eager to please which makes training a breeze. So, when combining these two it can be expected that overall the Malinois Greyhound will be easy to train but might have a couple of stubborn spells every once in a while. On top of this, the Malinois is energetic enough that the Malinois Greyhound will be playful and energetic with a very loyal and affectionate personality. He will not be a big barker unless something suspicious is going on, making him a good breed to have in a small home or apartment with neighbors close by.

Malinois Greyhound Activity Requirements

Because the Greyhound does not need a lot of physical activity to be happy, it balances out the Malinois very nicely, who has a very high energy level. Therefore, the Malinois Greyhound is a dog that will need exercise daily, but will also do well in smaller homes as long as he has a space for exercise. Activities such as a long walk and a training session are great for keeping the Malinois Greyhound well-behaved and tired out. Due to this fact, such a breed is great for anyone who lives a busier lifestyle and wants a dog that will play with them and go for jogs, but also won't require hours of physical activity. Just keep in mind that physical activity alone won't be enough to wear out the Malinois Greyhound. Both of the parent breeds used in this hybrid combination are very intelligent and therefore the Malinois Greyhound will need mental stimulation in order to remain well-behaved and non-destructive.
Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
9 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
60 minutes

Malinois Greyhound Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
3 cups
Daily Cost
$1.5 - $1.9
Monthly Cost
$35 - $52

Malinois Greyhound Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Malinois Greyhound size stats at six months
Height: 17 inches Weight: 45 lbs
Female Malinois Greyhound size stats at six months
Height: 16 inches Weight: 37 lbs
12 Months
Male Malinois Greyhound size stats at 12 months
Height: 22 inches Weight: 60 lbs
Female Malinois Greyhound size stats at 12 months
Height: 21 inches Weight: 50 lbs
18 Months
Male Malinois Greyhound size stats at 18 months
Height: 27 inches Weight: 75 lbs
Female Malinois Greyhound size stats at 18 months
Height: 26 inches Weight: 62 lbs

Malinois Greyhound Owner Experiences

6 Months
3 People
House & Yard
Super happy and friendly dog! Enjoys playing with other dogs
2 months, 2 weeks ago
Book me a walkiee?
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd