Taylor's Bulldane

Home > Dog Breeds > Taylor's Bulldane
150-175 lbs
25-28"
United States
Old Tyme Bulldog
Great Dane

The Taylor’s Bulldane is part Old Tyme Bulldog and part Great Dane. The Old Tyme Bulldog is a rare breed so that makes the Taylor’s Bulldog very unique. They are giant dogs that weigh between 150 and 200 pounds and stand about 25 to 30 inches high. Their short, fine coat makes them easy to care for and they are generally healthy and can live into their teen years. While they are an excellent addition to any family, they do best in homes with a lot of space and a fenced yard so they have room to play. This breed is easy to train and gets along well with other dogs and older children. 

Purpose
Companion, Guard Dog
Date of Origin
2000s
Ancestry
Old Tyme Bulldog and Great Dane

Taylor's Bulldane Health

Average Size
Male Taylor's Bulldane size stats
Height: 27-30 inches Weight: 175-200 lbs
Female Taylor's Bulldane size stats
Height: 25-28 inches Weight: 150-175 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Hip And Elbow Dysplasia
  • Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM)
  • Gastric Dilation Volvulus (GDV) or Bloat
  • CVI (Wobbler’s Syndrome)
Minor Concerns
  • Entropion
  • Ectropion
  • Microphthalmia
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Skin Allergies
  • Various Eye Conditions
  • Skin Infections
Occasional Tests
  • Eye Examination
  • Skin Evaluation
  • Skin Biopsy
  • Diagnostic Imaging
  • Cardiac Test

Taylor's Bulldane Breed History

The history of the Taylor’s Bulldane is spotty at best because the history of the Old Tyme Bulldog is not very well-known as the breed has only been around since the 1980s. A Bulldog lover named Steve Barnett decided to remake the Bulldog into the more original style of Bulldog so he used certain old-fashioned Victorian Bulldogs from a breeder named Ken Mollett for their strength and athleticism. After a few generations of breeding, the Old Tyme Bulldog has become a loyal and affectionate dog with a great personality that can fit into any family. The Old Tyme Bulldog is a Bulldog with a more lengthy body and sleek appearance. However, they are still Bulldogs with a Bulldog history that dates back to the 1200s in England where they were bred from the Asian Mastiffs and other dogs that wandered around in that area at the time. They were originally bred to bait bulls so they are very courageous, have a high tolerance for pain, tons of energy, and endless stamina. The Old Tyme Bulldog is not recognized by the American Kennel Club but the Bulldog has been a member since 1886 and is the 4th most well-liked breed in America. The Great Dane is thought to have originated around 3000 B.C. as proven by their existence in carvings found on Egyptian tombs. Back then, these giant dogs were used to fight bulls and bears but today, they are more of a companion than a fighter. These gentle giants originated in Germany from the Greyhound, Old English Mastiff, and Wolfhound. The breed may have been around earlier in Tibet, according to Chinese writings from 1121 B.C., but the experts are not certain. They were first called the Boar Hound since they hunted wild boar but then their name was switched to English Dogges sometime in the 16th century and then changed again to Kammerhunde (Chamber dogs) in the 1600s. In the 18th century, a dog similar to the Kammerhunde was found in Denmark and was named Grand Danois, which they later changed to Great Danish Dogs or Danish Mastiffs. In the late 1880s, the breed finally got the name Great Dane from the breeders and judges in Germany. However, these dogs were different than the modern Great Danes of today because they were more aggressive and violent due to their breeding. The German breeders were able to make the breed more gentle and they were accepted by the AKC in 1887. The breed is now the 14th most common dog breed in America.

Taylor's Bulldane Breed Appearance

The Taylor’s Bulldane is a large dog that can reach about 200 pounds and 30 inches tall. Their coat is short, straight, fine, flat, and comes in many different colors and patterns. Some of these include blue, gray, pied, brindle, sable, red, black, chocolate, liver, merle, speckled, orange, white, and lemon. They have a stocky and muscular body with well-toned legs, a broad chest, small ears, and a massive head with a black nose and almond-shaped brown eyes. Like the Bulldog, the Taylor’s Bulldane has a lot of extra skin that can be wrinkly and needs extra care to reduce the chances of irritation and rash.
Eye Color Possibilities
brown Taylor's Bulldane eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Taylor's Bulldane nose
Black
Coat Color Possibilities
brindle Taylor's Bulldane coat
Brindle
sable Taylor's Bulldane coat
Sable
pied Taylor's Bulldane coat
Pied
white Taylor's Bulldane coat
White
blue Taylor's Bulldane coat
Blue
fawn Taylor's Bulldane coat
Fawn
cream Taylor's Bulldane coat
Cream
red Taylor's Bulldane coat
Red
brown Taylor's Bulldane coat
Brown
gray Taylor's Bulldane coat
Gray
black Taylor's Bulldane coat
Black
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Taylor's Bulldane straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Taylor's Bulldane Breed Maintenance

The Taylor’s Bulldane does not need much maintenance because they have a sleek, thin coat. You should brush your dog’s coat about three or four times per week with a rubber curry mitt or a slicker brush to stimulate circulation and prevent excessive shedding. Also, you can bathe your Taylor’s Bulldane one a month or when needed. Mild conditioning shampoo should be used and you should be careful to dry your dog’s skin thoroughly to prevent pyoderma or other skin issues due to their excess skin folds. Trim your dog’s toenails as needed and clean his teeth once a week to prevent tooth disease.
Brushes for Taylor's Bulldane
Slicker Brush
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Taylor's Bulldane requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Taylor's Bulldane Temperament

Although the Taylor’s Bulldane enjoys other dogs and older children, they do not get along that great with other types of pets such as cats and should not be left alone with small children. They are too big to be safe with the little ones without supervision. Also, they should be socialized when young so they can get along with other dogs better. This breed is definitely friendly, affectionate, and calm for the most part and especially easy to train. In fact, even first-time dog owners should be able to train this type of dog easily. They do need a lot of attention and are susceptible to separation anxiety.

Taylor's Bulldane Activity Requirements

The Taylor’s Bulldane does not need too much exercise but they do need plenty of room to run around in so they would not do well in small apartments without a yard. They have to have at least a half an hour to 45 minutes of vigorous physical activity every day as well as an hour or more of mental stimulation from you. A large, fenced yard is good for this breed so you can let them run around out there for a while every day. Some of their favorite activities include agility training, obedience training, tracking, fly-ball, playing with other dogs at the dog park, and going for walks in the neighborhood.
Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
7 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
30 minutes

Taylor's Bulldane Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
4.5 cups
Daily Cost
$3.20 - $4.00
Monthly Cost
$96.00 - $120.00

Taylor's Bulldane Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Taylor's Bulldane size stats at six months
Height: 27 inches Weight: 87 lbs
Female Taylor's Bulldane size stats at six months
Height: 25 inches Weight: 62 lbs
12 Months
Male Taylor's Bulldane size stats at 12 months
Height: 28 inches Weight: 125 lbs
Female Taylor's Bulldane size stats at 12 months
Height: 26 inches Weight: 100 lbs
18 Months
Male Taylor's Bulldane size stats at 18 months
Height: 29 inches Weight: 187 lbs
Female Taylor's Bulldane size stats at 18 months
Height: 27 inches Weight: 162 lbs

Taylor's Bulldane Owner Experiences

Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd