Chinese Crested

5-12 lbs
11-13"
China
Chinese Hairless, Chinese Edible Dog, Chinese Ship Dog, Chinese Royal Hairless

The Chinese Crested Dog is classified as a “toy” due to its size, and many owners would agree that the Chinese Crested is a great lapdog. The actual origins of the Chinese Crested are not known, experts seem to think that the Chinese Crested is somehow related to hairless South American breeds. At one time, hairlessness was thought to be a mutation appearing in pariah dog litters. Some stories exist that say that the Chinese Crested was used by the Aztecs as a bedwarmer, and other sources claim this breed is a cross between a Mexican Hairless Dog and a Chihuahua. The Chinese Crested was originally used as a “ratter,” and today there are still many Chinese Crested Dogs in port cities. The Chinese Crested is a loyal and entertaining dog.

Purpose
ratter
Date of Origin
1200s
Ancestry
mexican hairless, chihuahua

Chinese Crested Health

Sketch of Chinese Crested
Average Size
Male Chinese Crested size stats
Height: 11-13 inches Weight: 5-12 lbs
Female Chinese Crested size stats
Height: 11-13 inches Weight: 5-12 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Usually A Very Healthy Breed
Minor Concerns
  • Skin Problems
  • Contact Allergy
  • Dentition Problems
Occasional Tests
  • Skin Scraping
  • Dental Examination
  • Physical Examination
  • Allergy Tests

Chinese Crested Breed History

The exact origins of the Chinese Crested Dog are not documented, but some claim that the dog originated in Africa and was known as the “African hairless dog.” It is thought that trading ships picked up the dog with plans to use the breed as a “ratter.” Some think Chinese trading ships used the dog for trading purposes in Egypt, Turkey, and Central and South America. There is evidence of the breed as far back as the 1200s. Explorers and missionaries wrote about seeing them in ports all over the world. In the 1800s, paintings and later actual photographs recorded evidence of Chinese Cresteds in Europe. At the time, some Chinese Crested Dogs were found in zoos. Earlier names of the Chinese Crested include Chinese Hairless, the Chinese Edible Dog, the Chinese Ship Dog, and the Chinese Royal Hairless. The modern name reflects the idea that the Chinese Crested spent much time on Chinese trading ships. The “crested” part of its name comes from the “crest” of hair on top of its head.  Ida Garrett helped to popularize the breed in the late 1800s. The breed was not officially recognized by the American Kennel Club until 1991.

Chinese Crested Breed Appearance

There are two varieties of the Chinese Crested Dog: hairless and powder puff. Both variations can occur in the same litter. The hairless Chinese Crested will have no hair with the exception of his head, tail, and feet (and the hair at those places will be long). A powder puff Chinese Crested will have a full coat of hair with a wooly undercoat that must be carefully brushed. The dog is usually small, reaching a height of eleven to thirteen inches and an adult weight of five to twelve pounds. Any color is permissible under AKC guidelines. This cute breed will have naturally upright ears, but may suffer from dentition of the teeth. The Chinese Crested is usually slender, and its body may be longer than the animal is tall. The neck is arched, and its tail tapers to a curve at the end. The hairless usually has soft fur at the head, feet, and tail; the body will be soft and smooth. The powder puff Chinese Crested Dog will have a double coat; the hair is straight and dense.

Eye Color Possibilities
brown Chinese Crested eyes
Brown
Nose Color Possibilities
black Chinese Crested nose
Black
brown Chinese Crested nose
Brown
Coat Color Possibilities
black Chinese Crested coat
Black
brown Chinese Crested coat
Brown
cream Chinese Crested coat
Cream
blue Chinese Crested coat
Blue
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Chinese Crested straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Chinese Crested Breed Maintenance

The hairless version of the Chinese Crested Dog necessitates considerably less care than its powder puff counterpart. The powder puff Crested should be brushed daily. Its wooly undercoat can become matted easily, so care must be taken to brush the undercoat properly. Hairless varieties may need sunscreen when outdoors for prolonged periods. Weekly bathing can prevent the pesky blackheads Chinese Cresteds are prone to. Moisturizer should be applied to the skin of hairless Chinese Crested Dogs as well. The breed is considered hypoallergenic, is very clean, and does not have much trouble with fleas or ticks. The Chinese Crested is highly intelligent, loving, and playful. They do not require much exercise and enjoy being “lap-warmers.” The hairless variety is sensitive to cold, so a sweater might be appropriate when outside during the cooler months (though not a wool sweater as many of this breed have an allergy to wool). The Chinese Crested should always be an inside dog. It does not enjoy being alone and does best when in the presence of its loving family.

Brushes for Chinese Crested
Pin Brush
Comb
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Chinese Crested requires daily brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Chinese Crested Temperament

The Chinese Crested Dog is alert, affectionate, and enjoys human companionship. They remember things that get your attention and are likely to do them over and over again to entertain you. Often described as “cat-like,” you may find your Chinese Crested sitting in high places, such as the back of the couch or the arm of a chair. Chinese Cresteds learn quickly and have been known to participate successfully in performance activities such as agility, obedience, flyball, and lure coursing. They are fairly active dogs, though they are not hyper. They love children, but as they are very small, supervision is a must. They might not be the best choice for a family with toddlers unless you are prepared to watch them closely. They get along with other dogs well. They seldom bark.  Unfortunately, they are tough to housebreak, so the utmost patience should be exercised with the Chinese Crested in this regard. They are often referred to as “clownish,” and they love to please and entertain their owners.

Chinese Crested Activity Requirements


Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
6 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
30 minutes

Chinese Crested Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
0.8 cups
Daily Cost
$0.75 - $1.00
Monthly Cost
$20.00 - $30.00

Chinese Crested Height & Weight

6 Months
Sketch of Chinese Crested at six months
Male Chinese Crested size stats at six months
Height: 7 inches Weight: 5 lbs
Female Chinese Crested size stats at six months
Height: 7 inches Weight: 5 lbs
12 Months
Sketch of Chinese Crested at 12 months
Male Chinese Crested size stats at 12 months
Height: 12 inches Weight: 7 lbs
Female Chinese Crested size stats at 12 months
Height: 12 inches Weight: 7 lbs
18 Months
Sketch of Chinese Crested at 18 months
Male Chinese Crested size stats at 18 months
Height: 12 inches Weight: 8 lbs
Female Chinese Crested size stats at 18 months
Height: 12 inches Weight: 8 lbs

Top Chinese Crested Breeders

Check out who made our list for the most reputable Chinese Crested breeders of 2018.
Top Chinese Crested breeder Rock Creek
Rock Creek
Lewisburg, West Virginia
Top Chinese Crested breeder Dmarie's Cresteds, Maltese & Toy Poodles
Dmarie's Cresteds, Maltese & Toy Poodles
Seattle, Washington
Top Chinese Crested breeder Legendary Chinese Cresteds
Legendary Chinese Cresteds
Saratoga Springs, New York
Top Chinese Crested breeder Belews Chinese Cresteds
Belews Chinese Cresteds
Belews Creek, North Carolina
Top Chinese Crested breeder The Cranberry Dog
The Cranberry Dog
Holland, Michigan
Top Chinese Crested breeder Long Road Kennel
Long Road Kennel
Decatur, Illinois
Top Chinese Crested breeder Badgercrest Kennel
Badgercrest Kennel
Lyle, Washington
Top Chinese Crested breeder Country Chinese Cresteds
Country Chinese Cresteds
Frankfort, Indiana
Top Chinese Crested breeder Shida Chinese Cresteds
Shida Chinese Cresteds
Hesperia, California
Top Chinese Crested breeder Gingery Chinese Cresteds
Gingery Chinese Cresteds
Ronkonkoma, New York

Chinese Crested Owner Experiences

3 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
pets
cuddle
Being Spoiled
The Chinese Crested is very similar to the Chihuahua in attitude. If you spoil them it will definitely show. I find that these dogs don't really bark as much as their cousins though. They are great with taking verbal commands and unlike normal dogs you shouldn't really worry much if you don't see them pant much in the heat. They have sweat glands! Unfortunately since they lack fur on mist of their body you may want to consider dog safe sunscreen if you plan on taking them out under the sun for long. They have a really royal calm side to them which comes into a great benefit when adopting this dog whether you be young or elderly they make great companions. Now many people may want to dress these cuties up but always keep aware that many Chinese Crested dogs do tend to have an allergy towards wool. Overall this is a great pooch to have whether you live in an apartment or house.
7 months, 4 weeks ago
4 Years
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
pets
cuddle
I was pleasantly surprised by this breed. I walked and sat a Chinese Crested and did not expect him to be so sweet. He walked with me very easily and was very well trained. He of course was small so we didn’t run too far, only slight burst of jogging on and off. He was more docile and liked a light stroll around the neighborhood. When sitting him he just wanted to be held. I got so many snuggles in! He was attached at the hip! There were various toys around the house that I thought were his but ended up actually being the cat toys. This Crested didn’t really play at all he truly just wanted all my love. So sweet! As far as his grooming went, the owner had him groomed to where his head hair was long and his body hair was short. His leg hair was long and it kind of looked like he was wearing bell bottoms. He didn’t shed because he had hair not fur so it would get knotty, very easy to brush it. He did have to be taken out every 2 hours to potty but he was very greatful. He didn’t eat a lot only requiring 1/2 cup of food. Overall great breed for an owner or walker who wants a snuggle companion or an easy leisurely walk.
8 months ago
18 Months
People
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
The Powderpuff is not affected by many of the congenital diseases found in other toy breeds. They are, however, prone to some of these conditions listed. Eye problems such as lens luxation, glaucoma, and PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy), luxating patellas, and Legg-Pethes disease. The Powderpuff should have full dentition, not missing or crooked teeth, as is accepted in their sibling the Hairless variety.
8 months ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd