Bodacion

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United States
Border Collie
Dalmatian
The Bodacion is a medium sized dog with medium to long hair and a great mix of both Border Collie and Dalmatian. This is such a new hybrid breed that there is not much information on them so it is important to take into account the aspects of the parent breeds. The Border Collie is from the pastoral group of working farm dogs and is great for herding sheep and other animals. They are also used for rescues and in obedience competitions. The Dalmatian is popular for their spotted coat and their book and movie career. They make great pets and are also excellent as working dogs.
Purpose
Non-sporting
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Border Collie, Dalmation

Bodacion Breed History

There is no history about the Bodacion because they have not been around long. Because of this, the characteristics of the parent breeds are used for their history. The Border Collie originated in the 1800s in Great Britain although some say this dog was depicted in wood carvings created before that time by Thomas Beckwith. This breed is considered to be the ultimate sheepdog and was actually the first documented champion of the sheepdog competition in 1873. The Border Collie is known for being able to herd sheep by just looking at them instead of barking and nipping at them. They were accepted by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1995 and are the 38th most popular dog in the United States. The Dalmatian has been around since ancient times and originated in Croatia. It is believed that this breed was used as a hound dog in ancient times although there are many other stories about their history. Their function varies since the Dalmatian has a variety of talents such as a war dog, trailer, shepherd, sentinel, ratter, draft dog, circus dog, and bird dog. However, what the Dalmatian is most known for is as a coach dog from back in the Victorian days in England. These dogs would protect the horses by running alongside coaches. In fact, they became known as the mascot in fire departments due to their job as a coach dog for horse drawn fire engines. The Dalmatian was officially recognized by the AKC in 1888 and is the 62nd most popular dog breed in the United States.

Bodacion Breed Appearance

The Bodacion has a medium to long coat that can come in many different colors but is usually a mix of two or more colors such as black, white, merle, liver, yellow, or brown. Because the parent breeds are both medium sized dogs, the Bodacion is usually of medium size as well. They have a small head and floppy triangular ears with a medium sized muzzle and they sometimes have two different colored eyes. They have long and muscular legs with big feet and a long tail that may be furry. They have intelligent expressions and look like a fuzzy Dalmatian.

Bodacion Breed Maintenance

Due to their long hair, the Bodacion should be brushed thoroughly with a hard bristle brush at least two or three times a week. In addition, you should use a metal comb or your fingers to loosen and remove tangles. You can bathe them when needed but do not shampoo too often because it removes the oils they need for healthy skin and hair. You should check their ears for wax, dirt, and debris at least once a week and clean as directed by your veterinary care provider. Also, brush your Bodacion’s teeth once or twice a week to prevent dental problems.

Bodacion Activity Requirements

The temperament of the Bodacion is generally friendly and lovable but should be watched with strangers. Due to their Border Collie parentage, they sometimes try to herd small children and other pets so they should be watched with young children. If they are socialized at a young age, they can be wonderful and sociable pets but may be standoffish if not. Dalmatians are known to be hunters so they may not be safe to leave alone with small animals such as hamsters or kittens. They are extremely intelligent and love to please their owners so they are great at obedience and agility training.

Bodacion Owner Experiences

Dex, Molly and Ted
3 Years
2 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Agility training
Herding
Walkin
I got my first one, Dex who lived till he was 14. Great with kids, people and other dogs. We did agility and long hikes. He could sleep all day or run all day, iyt was up to me. I have Molly and Ted who are 2 and 3. Similar to Dex but slighty more nervous. Ted will shred anything is left alone but Molly is perfect. Doesnt run away, easy to train, very intellegent. Ted was harder to train but we got there. They are nothing like a border Collie as I have 2 of those as well. They are calmer and need less exercise with their brain.
1 month, 3 weeks ago
Binx
4 Months
2 People
House
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
swimming
Run
Bath time
Fetch
Got him at 4 weeks old (came from my sister and his mother died during birth) he is on the smaller side but with lanky legs. Smoothe coat with border collie colouring. Hes a beautiful soul n so gentle with my cat n children.
2 months, 1 week ago
Bandit
10 Years
2 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Ball
outside
We adopted him a year ago. They said little about him except he killed sheep and chicken. He wasn't good around kids. He was so badly matted that his skin is scarred on his back and before he was shaved, he would growl if that area was touched. He is the best boy. Loyal, friendly, smart, docile, and nothing like we were told. He's a big boy that likes car rides and being with us.
3 months, 1 week ago
Zeni
8 Months
2 People
House & Yard
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
My Bodacion was a 2 month old female when I found her at a local dog pound. My fiancée and I fell in love with her at first sight and adopted her that day. She is a highly entergetic pooch, but is more than happy to cuddle up with you anytime, day or night, and won’t leave your side if she has the choice. Extremely loyal, especially to those who show her more attention. She lived with me the first month after her adoption, while she was recovering from her spaying. After that, she moved to Michigan with my fiancée and lived with her for 5 months. I assumed she wouldn’t remember me after 5 months apart. Apparently I showed her enough affection that she did, because when I finally went to move my fiancée and Zeni from Michigan to my hometown, my little girl couldn’t contain herself and jumped all over me for 15 minutes before she calmed down. My fiancée claimed she never showed anyone the slightest interest, even people she knew and was around often would only get a minor greeting from the dog. Even now, after having the dog and my fiancée home for 2 weeks now, Zeni has already chosen me, the guy she’s only lived with for one month, over my fiancée who she lived with for 5. My fiancée treats her just fine, but doesn’t interact with her as much as I do and it heavily influences who Zeni runs too when we come home, whose side of the bed she sleeps on the floor next to, who she obeys commands from, etc. She is very intelligent, and at 2 months old after just an hour of training had already mastered the basic “sit, stay, lay down” and had house-training figured out quickly as well. Even while dealing with the spay recovery, she still had intense energy and loved to play. It took all of my constant supervision to ensure she didn’t exert herself and rip her sutures open. I feel if I had given her the choice to run as she wanted to, she would have had serious issues. She can NOT be left alone indoors, as she will destroy EVERYTHING. She knows she’s not supposed to, but puppies with that high energy just can’t help it. Once I got home and found the house destroyed (the little escape artist managed to somehow open the pocket door to the kitchen I had her locked in while I ran to the store) and all I did was stand in the middle of the destroyed living room, get down next to her and point a finger at her, inches from her nose and sternly tell her no, bad dog. I didn’t tell, I didn’t hit her, I simply brought her next to whatever she had ruined, showed it to her and gave her a tap on the snout. Her body language was a dead giveaway that she knew instantly she was in trouble. Head down, avoiding my eyes, and when I started cleaning up the messes she had made she followed me around, head still down, a sad, slow walk. Since than I’ve started leaving her outside during the day if the weather is nice, with the teaching aid of a shock collar. A nice rig I picked up at tractor supply, that runs off a radius up to 90 foot from a tower you set up in your house. It has 6 levels of intensity for your dogs “stubbornness” level. I left it on the lowest setting and went for a walk with her to the boundary of the range. The collar beeps 5 times quickly, and gives one small shock. She only needed one shock to learn that beeping=bad. After that, she wore the collar until she learned the parameter of the yard (never being shocked again, just moving back to the house when she heard the beep) and now she doesn’t even need the collar. I can go outside, leave the gate open, and walk outside the boundary and she sits down and waits for me, just feet from the edge. I’m convinced she KNOWS she can go outside without the collar on, but she also knows that the boundary is the boundary and will not leave it unless I were to carry her. She is pleasant to all people she meets, even strangers get a warm greeting. She rarely barks, and is great with people. The only time I’ve had concern is when I realized after watching her for awhile with young kids, I noticed she seems scared of children. When a group of 3 girls, ages 4-7 tried playing with her and petting her she would run away and hide, or run to me. I assumed she was just not in the mood for attention. But than a week later my 3 year old niece wanted to pet her and she did it again, came and jumped in my lap on the chair and started shaking. I held her to my and spoke to her to calm her down while my niece came closer to pet her. The dog never raised her hair or ears or bared her teeth or even tensed a muscle, but she did let out a long, low growl at my niece. Since than I’ve decided not to let her around children until I figure out why she’s so scared of them, I don’t know if she had a bad experience in Michigan or what happened, but it is slightly concerning, though I don’t think she would attack a child. I feel like her growl was out of nervousness or discomfort, not aggression or a warning. She was pure white, with black ears when I got her at 2 months. Now at 8 months, she is flecked with black spots. Not nearly as much as a full Dalmatian, but enough to know her bloodlines. She has the body of a collie, the face and ears of a collie, but the legs and black eyes of a Dalmatian. Her fur is in the middle. It’s longer than a Dalmatians fur, but shorter than most any collie I’ve seen. And it’s not as dense as a collie, but more than a Dalmatian. Whoever had her when she was born docked her tail, and although her stub is growing as she does, she still doesn’t have much of a tail. When she’s happy, the whole back half of her body wiggles back and forth, so it’s still easy to tell when she’s excited, even without a tail to see wagging. The vet ruled her healthy, good circulation and respiratory, no problems with her health. I have noticed she has dreams. A lot. Every night she will pant, or groan in her sleep. Just for a few minutes. Or else her paws will all twitch and her lips will curl, or she’ll just start breathing heavily and shaking. It worried me skit at first, but after watching some videos I took my vet said it’s nothing to worry about. At the end of the day, she’s exactly what you would expect from a bodacion. She has more of a collie’s mentality and nature, and her body is a mixture of the two. She is loyal, energetic, highly intelligent, friendly, and loves to please people. Collies and Dalmatians are both great dog breeds, and a hybrid of the two is no exception. I don’t know what I would do without my little Zeni.
3 months, 3 weeks ago
Casper
8 Years
3 People
Apartment
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Running
Casper is like a loving baby brother for me. He shows me much love and still behaves like an energetic puppy at the age of 8
7 months, 3 weeks ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd