Home > Dog Breeds > Cockerbull
30-40 lbs
​United States
Cocker Spaniel
English Bulldog

The Cockerbull is a mix between the Cocker Spaniel and the Bulldog. With this being a new and rather unusual combination, there isn’t too much information that is specific to the Cockerbull. Thankfully, we have loads of information on the parent breeds so we can get a decent idea of what this dog is like. For instance, while the Cocker Spaniel is a high maintenance breed, the Bulldog is not, so the Cockerbull will be in-between needing lots of grooming or minimal grooming, depending on which parent breed’s genes are more prominent. Both dogs are loyal and easy-going, great with children of all ages and quite tolerant of other pets. The only thing to keep in mind is that while the Cocker Spaniel is easy to train, the Bulldog is not; so be prepared to work on training consistently and often. This is a small to medium sized breed that seems to maintain the body shape of the Cocker Spaniel, while following after the coloring of the Bulldog. The Cockerbull does not bark often and makes a great companion animal for any sized household.

Date of Origin
Cocker Spaniel, Bulldog

Cockerbull Health

Average Size
Male Cockerbull size stats
Height: 14-15 inches Weight: 40-50 lbs
Female Cockerbull size stats
Height: 14-15 inches Weight: 30-40 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Pulmonic Stenosis
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Eye Problems
  • Brachycephalic Syndrome
Minor Concerns
  • Urolithiasis
  • Familial Nephropathy
  • Cleft Palate
  • Skin Fold Dermatitis
  • Persistent Pupillary Membrane
  • Hemivertebrae
  • Mono/Bilateral Cryptorchidism
  • Eye Abnormalities
  • Sick Sinus Syndrome
  • Tetralogy of Fallot
  • Demodicosis
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Deafness
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Skin Allergies
Occasional Tests
  • Hip X-Rays
  • Physical Examination
  • Eye Examinations
  • Complete Blood Work
  • Cardiac Ultrasound

Cockerbull Breed History

While the Cockerbull himself is much too new of a breed to have a lot of history, his parent breeds are well documented. For example, the Cocker Spaniel is a breed of dog that was originally used as a hunting companion who loved to flush game out from the bushes and retrieve it on command. His name, the Cocker, stems from his unique skill of hunting a type of wading bird called the woodcock. The Cocker Spaniel is the smallest in the Sporting Group but that doesn’t slow him down. This breed is recognized by their beautiful silky coat, intelligent brown eyes, and long velvety ears; the Cocker Spaniel actually become popular thanks to being featured in Disney’s animated film “Lady and the Tramp” in 1955. This popularity, however, lead to careless breeding and allowed some negative traits to appear in the litters that followed. Despite this fact, if you find a reputable breeder, you can get a loving, sweet dog that will blend into your family effortlessly. The Bulldog is much loved here in America, but he didn’t actually make his way here until the year 1886. At first, he was used in England for some rather tough sport. The Bulldog, known for his tenacious personality and strong jaw, was bred this way for a reason; the original Bulldogs were used in a sport called bullbaiting, where they were made to grab bulls by the nose and hold on tight. Gone are those days now and the the Bulldog we love today is gentle and perfectly happy with taking a nap on the couch. They make an excellent companion dog, but that stubborn streak can still show through at times, especially when it comes to training. The Bulldog was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1886 and are now used for showing, companion animals, and even the U.S. Marine Corps mascot! When you combine these two breeds together, you get a loving, gentle, cuddly dog breed that is loyal to his family and relatively easy to train. The Cockerbull is great with kids and other animals, and does well in any sized home.

Cockerbull Breed Appearance

The Cockerbull, as a hybrid, is going to have varying appearances depending on which parent breed’s genetics is stronger. The typical look for this breed however, tends to follow somewhat along the lines of a Cocker Spaniel body, with a longer muzzle, shorter loose ears, and dark intelligent eyes. The coat is short and can be either a soft texture like the Cocker Spaniel or a courser feeling like the Bulldog. The Bulldog’s strong features are carried over into the breed and while the Cockerbull is not a large dog, he holds himself squarely and strong. Colors of the coat can range between tan with black and white marking, and white with a black nose. The females are slightly smaller than the males and have a distinct female delicacy to them. The tail is usually docked short and the eyes are a very dark brown. This breed will shed seasonally but grooming is relatively easy. Due to the fact that their coats are shorter, the Cockerbull likes warmer weather better and can get cold easily.

Eye Color Possibilities
brown Cockerbull eyes
Nose Color Possibilities
black Cockerbull nose
Coat Color Possibilities
white Cockerbull coat
brown Cockerbull coat
black Cockerbull coat
pied Cockerbull coat
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Cockerbull straight coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Cockerbull Breed Maintenance

While the Bulldog is known for drooling and the Cocker Spaniel is known for being high maintenance, the Cockerbull is the best of both worlds in these categories. Because he does not have the same squashed face as the Bulldog, drooling is not typically a problem. Also, his fur will not be as long and time consuming to groom as the Cocker Spaniel. This being said, the Cockerbull will have a tendency to shed and will need to be brushed a couple times a week with a rubbery curry brush and a comb. Doing so will remove any dirt and loose hair that may be lying on the body and keep shedding to a minimum. On top of this, your dog should receive a couple of baths a month with a gentle shampoo to keep their fur nice and clean and any doggy odor away. Be sure to speak with your vet about a shampoo that will work best for your Cockerbull as both the Bulldog and the Cocker Spaniel have sensitive skin that is prone to allergic breakouts. Besides brushing and bathing, be sure to dry your dog’s ears thoroughly after bathing or swimming to avoid any infections due to leftover moisture and trim your dog’s nails every few weeks or so to keep the feet healthy.

Brushes for Cockerbull
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Cockerbull requires weekly brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Cockerbull Temperament

Because the Bulldog is so tenacious, get ready to have a little dog with a big personality. Thankfully, both the Bulldog and the Cocker Spaniel are very loving and gentle dogs, that do great with families of all kinds. While the Cocker Spaniel is a bit more on the high-energy side thanks to his hunting back ground, the Bulldog balances that out nicely with a more laid back disposition. A long nap on the couch is the perfect afternoon for this breed, and when it comes to the Cockerbull, you can expect that he will love to cuddle and still play when he feels like it. The Cockerbull does not have a tendency to bark often and because he is lower energy, will do very well in apartments and smaller homes. Just keep in mind that training, while easy for the most part, may be  a bit frustrating with the Cockerbull. This is just because the Bulldog has a stubborn side that may shine through, but with patience and an early start to the training, you will end up with an excellent dog that respects you and knows how to behave. Ealy socialization is also important to ensure that your dog is comfortable around strangers and other animals.

Cockerbull Activity Requirements

The Cockerbull will not need too much physical activity due to the fact that both parent breeds are relatively laid back, the Bulldog more so than the Cocker Spaniel. This means that just a few minutes of hearty exercise a day is more than enough to keep your Cockerbull happy and well behaved. Some activities that would work best for tiring out your pup would be a walk, playing at a park, training, or romping around the yard. Training is a great way to tire out your Cockerbull both mentally and physically, also helping to improve his manners and all around behavior. While this is not an overactive breed, boredom may still lead to destruction; so it is best to ensure that your Cockerbull gets some form of activity for 30 to 45 minutes each day.

Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
6 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
45 minutes

Cockerbull Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
3 cups
Daily Cost
$1.2 - $1.4
Monthly Cost
$34 - $45

Cockerbull Owner Experiences

12 Months
6 People
She loves walks an sea loves water
Jessie as just turned 12month she is a very excitable dog always wagging her tail follows u around she hates when shes alone she is good in the house but she not a loving dog she very changable can get very aggressive for no reason then few mins after wagging her tail again she is a odd one not had a dog like her she looks beautiful but very hard work
3 months, 3 weeks ago
Book me a walkiee?
Sketch of smiling australian shepherd