Poochin

6-13 lbs
7-15"
United States
Japanese Chin
Poodle
Chinpoo, Chindoodle, Doodlechin, Poo-Chin

The Poochin goes by many variations of names relating to its parentage and is recognized by four competitive breed associations.  The purebred Poodle and Japanese Chin make up the lovable ball of fur known as the Poochin.  This designer dog is an excellent companion dog with a playful, happy disposition and a quiet manner.  The Poochin does not require a lot of physical activity and enjoys a good lap, making them an ideal dog for older and less active folks wishing for the perfect companion.  Additionally, the Poochin may be a good fit for people who suffer from allergies, thanks to the hypoallergenic qualities of the Poodle parent.    

Purpose
Companion
Date of Origin
Unknown
Ancestry
Japanese Chin and Poodle

Poochin Health

Average Size
Male Poochin size stats
Height: 7-15 inches Weight: 6-13 lbs
Female Poochin size stats
Height: 7-15 inches Weight: 6-13 lbs
Major Concerns
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Mitral Valve Disease
Minor Concerns
  • Patellar Luxation
  • Cataracts
  • Diabetes
  • Von Willebrand's Disease
  • Addison's Disease
Occasional Diagnoses
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
  • Patent Ductus Arteriosis (PDA)
Occasional Tests
  • Eye Examination
  • Radiographs
  • Complete Physical Examination
  • Complete Blood Test
  • Heart Testing

Poochin Breed History

The Poochin is a popular designer mix due to the high popularity of both parents breeds as well as the well-known hypoallergenic qualities of the Poodle.  The Poochin does not have a detailed history or a hybrid standard and can look and behave like either parent.  Owners should review the histories and traits of both parents because of this variation. The Japanese Chin, despite its name, is a dog of the Chinese Imperial court.  The toy-sized companion was a favorite and often gifted to foreign emissaries when they visited the Chinese Emperor.  Several of the dogs made their way to Japan as gifts, and so beloved were they that the Japanese regarded them as "chin" rather than "inu", meaning as a separate being from the dog.  Over time, the small dog came to be known as the Japanese Chin in reference to its venerated status.  The Japanese Chin remained widely unknown by the rest of the world until the 19th Century when Japan began trading with the West.  The Japanese Chin, which has also gone by the Japanese Spaniel, enjoyed instant popularity after its introduction to the West and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1888. The Poodle is a German breed who many believe was the first waterfowl hunting dog.  The exact origins of the Poodle are unknown, and evidence suggests the Poodle's history extends back thousands of years.  Whatever the previous history, the Poodle clearly traces its lineage back the 1400s in Germany, which is also the same time the Toy and Miniature variations were introduced.  While the Standard and even Miniature varieties were used in Europe for duck hunting and truffle sniffing, respectively, the Toy variations served as companions.  With time, the image of the Poodle became more aristocratic, and people kept the dogs as companions, despite their working qualities.  The Poodle was a rare breed in the United States through the end of World War II, but the breed's popularity took up in the 1950's and the Poodle, recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1887, enjoyed two decades as the most popular breed in the United States.      

Poochin Breed Appearance

The Poochin is a designer hybrid between the Japanese Chin and Poodle.  Most hybrids are crossbred with the Toy Poodle variation to maintain a small size and the Poochin can resemble either parent.  However, the Poochin's head is round with a broad muzzle and small to medium-sized nose.  The eyes are dark and the ears fold down with moderate feathering.  Even though the Poochin is small and doesn't weight much, its body is sturdy with straight legs and a tail that often curls over the back.  The Poochin's hair is medium in length and slightly wavy.  Though not common, the Poochin may be taller and weigh more if it is crossbred with the Miniature or Standard Poodle variations.
Nose Color Possibilities
black Poochin nose
Black
brown Poochin nose
Brown
Coat Color Possibilities
red Poochin coat
Red
sable Poochin coat
Sable
silver Poochin coat
Silver
cream Poochin coat
Cream
gray Poochin coat
Gray
black Poochin coat
Black
white Poochin coat
White
Coat Length
Short Medium Long
Coat Density
Sparse Normal Dense
Coat Texture
Poochin wavy coat texture
Straight Wiry Wavy Curly Corded

Poochin Breed Maintenance

The Poochin, depending on its coat may be a little more difficult to groom and maintain.  That is because the Poodle's coat is dense and stands on end.  Owners should brush their Poochin several times a week to prevent tangles.  Despite the difficulties associated with maintaining a healthy coat, the Poochin is not known to shed much and may have hypoallergenic qualities based on the Poodle parent's bloodlines.  The Poochin may require more baths than other dogs because its hair doesn't release dirt as well by brushing.  However, always use hypoallergenic dog shampoo to prevent any skin issues and towel dry the hair and skin.
Brushes for Poochin
Pin Brush
Clipper
Nail Clipper
Brushing Frequency
Poochin requires daily brushing
Daily Weekly Monthly

Poochin Temperament

The Poochin makes for an excellent companion dog for the family, especially for singles and seniors who may not have a lot of time or ability to devote to rigorous exercise.  However low the energy and intensity needs of the Poochin are, this hybrid still needs daily physical and mental stimulation to lead a happy, healthy life free of anxiety and behavioral issues as well as a preventative against weight gain.  Walks around the house or visits to the mailbox are perfect daily exercises owners can give their Poochin to support a healthy life.  The Poochin also loves children and does not bark often.  Like any other dog, the Poochin needs early and consistent socialization with people, children, places, and things as well.  Consistent socialization will also improve the Poochin's already accepting nature toward strangers.  The Poochin also does very well with other cats and dogs, though some dogs may put the Poochin on the defensive and requires owners to socialize their dogs early.

Poochin Activity Requirements

The Poochin has low energy needs and prefers a warm lap over an outdoor adventure.  As such, this hybrid adapts very easily to apartment life and can get most of its daily exercise requirements by following its owner around the apartment.  The Poochin likes more temperature climates but always prefers the warmth of indoor living.  Playing indoor ball for a few minutes a day can significantly improve the daily life of the Poochin who just wants to please its family.
Activity Level
Low Medium High
Rec. Walk Mileage Per Week
5 miles
Minutes of Activity Per Day
25 minutes

Poochin Food Consumption

Cups Per Day
0.5 cups
Daily Cost
$0.75 - $1.00
Monthly Cost
$20.00 - $30.00

Poochin Height & Weight

6 Months
Male Poochin size stats at six months
Height: 10 inches Weight: 8 lbs
Female Poochin size stats at six months
Height: 10 inches Weight: 8 lbs
12 Months
Male Poochin size stats at 12 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 9 lbs
Female Poochin size stats at 12 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 9 lbs
18 Months
Male Poochin size stats at 18 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 9 lbs
Female Poochin size stats at 18 months
Height: 11 inches Weight: 9 lbs

Poochin Owner Experiences

Pooch
12 Years
2 People
House
Health
Grooming
Friendliness
Energy
Trainability
Pastimes
Pooch was the best dog! He loved everyone and was very easily trainable. Pooch would walk by your side w/o a leash when needed. He was overall an enjoyable breed to own.
4 months, 3 weeks ago
Book me a walkiee?
Pweeeze!
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